What every incoming student should know

Hey everyone,

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It’s a very exciting time in the college and highschool world. For already college students finals are just around the cornor and for highschool students you are all getting acceptance letters and figuring out which will be the best choice. But FIT isnt like most colleges and obviously why you want to be here, with us! So well getting preapred for your new journy to college theres a few things you should know.

1. TEXTBOOKS

Dont ever buy your texts books ahead of time! I know being in college for the first time is very exciting and you want everything new because thats exactly what i did but you are going to waste a lot of money on them when you might not need them. Trust me a few months into college your going to wish you had that money back. But if you do in fact need to buy them make sure you check amazon, chegg, and even the library at school first. You can either find them cheaper, rent them or just copy the pages in the library on the copy machine that you need for each class, it may take a little extra time but you will save yourself some money.

2. Don’t be scared to speak up

No one ever likes being the bad student in class but sometimes you are and can’t help it. remember the teachers are there to help you succeed and they don’t want you to fail. Ask for help, go to extra classes if they let you or take time to go to their office hours, every second you really try helps and it will only make you get better from there. I know for me i’m always scared to admit that i am not doing so well, but being scared is really what holds you back in the end.

3. Internships, Internships, Internships!

As an incoming student the last thing on your mind is getting a job, you barely know about your major yet, but i promise they will help. It will give you a hands on experience and will also help you with your work in the classroom. Espically if you don’t understand something the person you work for may be able to help you with your work. I waited till my 3rd semester before i received an internship and i learned more in those few months working then I ever thought i could. Hands on experiencing really change how you view your work in school.

4.No debt, no problem

The first mistake I made in college was buying whatever I needed at whatever price it was because I didn’t know much about finding a better price. Needless to say my money supply ran short very quickly. So what I started to do was make a budget for myself and figure out where the cheapest places were to buy things I needed (food, books, everyday items, water) and it worked I cut down and saved more then a $100 a month!

It’s these little things that no one thinks about when entering college that you figure out a year or two after and realize how stupid you were to not do this stuff sooner. But for now it’s an amazingly exciting time ! I know your all going to love FIT.

XOXO

Kailee

 

 

Springtime in the City

The city is back to life! Trees are budding, flowers are being replanted, color is seeping back into the humans and surroundings of New York. People are smiling and laughing as they walk down the street, happy to finally unravel and de-bundle themselves from their winter jackets, hats and scarves. Dogs sniff their way down the street, able to enjoy their walk and not freeze their paws off! I think tears filled my eyes the other day as I walked down the street in a short sleeved shirt,  sans the jacket. What does all this mean….SPRING IS HERE!

Not only does the nice weather mean frequent visits to Central Park, the Highline, South Street Seaport and countless other sunny-day sites throughout the city but also a slew of festivals and events only spring in the big apple has to offer!

Below are a few that I will be trying out as we head to the end of the semester! If you happen to be visiting NY during this time check them out! As always, let me know what you think :)

1. Tribeca Film Festival, April 15-26

Who doesn’t love new movies? The Tribeca Film Festival is a world renowned festival that happens right in downtown Manhattan, as well as across the city. You can get matinee tickets for as little as $10 and tickets to guest talks for $35. The movies are ones not to be missed.

2. Cherry Blossom Season at Brooklyn Botanic Garden, April 1-26

Instead of hopping on a jet to Japan, hop on the subway to Brooklyn and see the natural wonders of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Get your iPhone camera’s ready because its impossible to see these beauties and not snap some photos. The Cherry Blossom Trees are a sure sign of Spring, so you don’t want to miss it. Only $10!

3. NYC Hot Sauce Expo, April 25-26

I know everyone doesn’t have the love of hot-spicy foods that I do…but maybe you’ll think twice after attending this event. The third annual hot sauce expo will be taking place at The Brooklyn Expo in late April, showcasing 45 vendors! Come with an empty stomach and leave thoroughly pleased. From spicy pizzas, to spicy bloody-marys – your tongue will be on fire…in the best way possible ;)

4. Kentucky Derby, May 2

Chances are you don’t have tickets to the actual Kentucky Derby horse race…but I’m sure you have a fabulous hat somewhere in your closet that you’re dying to break out! This is your opportunity! Many bars and restaurants around the city will be involved in this classic southern event. Gather your friends, don your best derby hat, find a bar showing the race and transport yourself to Kentucky! I recommend finding a horse who’s name makes you laugh…then root for them!

5. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Rooftop

I will definitely be heading to the Met Museum to check out the “Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky” exhibit running through May 10th. There are countless exhibitions to view, enough to fill your afternoon with beauty, history and culture. Before you go, make your way to the Met rooftop. This is one of the best views of the city, overlooking all of Central Park. Bask in the sun, feel the breeze, and look to the sky line – breathe in the beauty and magic of this city!

 

xx,

Brendan

 

Finishing an Internship. Now What?

As the semester comes to a close, many students, including myself are finishing off our semester long internships.  While this is my first internship through the school, I think there are a few standard requirements to say goodbye to your internship and leave on a good note.  Here’s my advice:

  1. Thank you note.  This is pretty standard, but it is important that you thank your supervisor(s) for giving you this opportunity.  A handwritten note given on the last day of your internship is always better than an email.  You don’t want to just leave without something physically tangible.  Whether your internship was amazing or not what you expected, you still learned what you liked and didn’t like.  You got something out of it, whether it was this grand wealth of knowledge or information to contribute to your future best-selling novel about internships.  Who knows?
  2. A gift.  While a thank you note is pretty much required, a gift is not.  It is though a very nice gesture to show your appreciation for your supervisor.  Whether you’re getting Baked by Melissa cupcakes for the whole department, our an individual Crumb’s cupcake, show your appreciation for your higher ups.
  3. A letter of recommendation and/or reference.  One of the most important things about an internship experience is what you learn and who you meet.  Having a letter of recommendation that you can bring to future interviews is a massive asset.  Ask your supervisor kindly for a letter of recommendation when you leave your internship rather than 6 months down the road and 24 hours before your interview.  The same goes with a reference.  Some supervisors may not want to be bothered, so check with your supervisor first and ask them what sort of communication they are okay with.  Do they prefer a phone call or email?  Be sure to ask!
  4. End on a good note.  Many sayings derive from “you’re only as good as your last (insert word)”.  This goes for internships too.  Just because it’s your last day or week, that doesn’t mean you should slack off or not take on new projects.  Give it your all as if it was your first week.  Be sure to leave on a positive note so that #3 will turn out in your favor.
  5. Reflect on what you learned. Internships are all about the learning experience so reflect on what you gained from your semester.  Decide what you want from your next internship and if you changed your career path or mindset compared to the beginning of your internship.
  6. Update your LinkedIn. This goes hand in hand with #5.  While the internship is still fresh in your mind, update your LinkedIn with the type of assignments and tasks that you did at your internship.  It’ll be much easier now when it’s fresh in your mind compared to a year from now because you finally reset your password!

Happy end of the semester!
Ashley

Love Your Library!

The FIT library is more than just a room with bookshelves; it has more resources than most students realize! Of course, the Gladys Marcus Library houses an impressive collection of print books pertaining to fashion, art, architecture, etc., but it also has books on every subject including history, psychology, and literature. There is also a whole section dedicated to DVDs of movies (classic as well as modern) and TV shows. In addition, if there is a book or journal that you cannot find in-house, FIT is part of the Interlibrary Loan system, so you can get anything you need! Before heading up there, here is some information about the various services offered:

See, we have stacks too!

See, we have stacks too!

Even a ton of books about economics

Even a ton of books about economics

Quiet Study Space

Quiet Study Space

Picture FilesPicture Files

The Picture Files are relatively new to the library. You can browse through the extensive collection freely and even check out up to 20 images at once! These can be extremely helpful for Illustration and Fine Arts students who need references. We also have access to the FitDigital Image Library, which is a digital collection of images from the Museum at FIT, the Special Collections, student and staff work, images used in Art History classes and the Designer Files collection.

Magazine

Vogue spreads from the 2000s vs the 1930s

Vogue spreads from the 2000s vs the 1930s

Magazine Archive

The Gladys Marcus library subscribes and keeps an archive of numerous magazines, mainly focused on design. The periodicals can be checked out for two hours either for reading or doing research. FIT also has a backlog of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar dating back to the very first issues. These are collected in books chronologically and can be looked at in the library at your leisure. We also have access to the Vogue Archives online that can be extra useful when you search within the collection for specific words or phrases. Designer Files can also be checked out. These are tear sheet collections of centered on a specific designer.

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Art Reference Collection

The Art Reference collection has the most inspiring books in the library. It is pretty much all of those beautiful coffee table books that are too expensive to buy yourself. The subjects range into all types of design, not just fashion. These books cannot be taken out of the library, but thanks to the scanners and copiers you can bring the images home.

Special Collections

The Special Collections houses over 500,000 books, periodicals, illustrations and designer scrapbooks. Any student or outside researcher can make an appointment, but you have to request a subject or time period you want to look at, you cannot just browse like in the Art Reference Collection or Picture Files.

Databases

In addition to print collections, the library subscribes to online databases that are incredibly helpful for research papers. The databases range across all types of topics from fashion history and forecasting to psychology and international trade. The FIT library’s website collects all of the databases in one place so they are easy to find and use. These databases are trustworthy sources for information and can be accessed at any time through the library website.

StyleCat

StyleCat is the main search engine used in the Gladys Marcus library. It can be accessed anywhere via the library website, but there are also computers stationed around the library with it open. It’s pretty basic: you search one or more terms and a list of all the books in the collection that relate pop-up with the call number and how many copies there are and which are checked out.

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FIT also uses the stairwells of the library as a gallery showcasing student and faculty work

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A main work area in the library

A friendly student librarian

A friendly student librarian

If you have more questions about these services, a librarian is always available to help at the desk or you can call 212-217-4400. If you have a question when the library is closed we have this handy feature called Ask a Librarian where you can call/text/send a message.

–Emily–

Notes From the 6 Train: Testin’ Ya Strengths

In my last post I briefly touched on the topic on the type of learner I am and I wanted to expand on this topic a bit. I also want to talk about the type of leader you are as well. These are two other pieces of knowledge I picked up in school that can quite helpful in other realms outside the classroom setting.

*the color personality test is one of favorites.

*the color personality test is one of favorites.

I’ve done several in class exercises and have taken multiple personality tests to assess both of these, but it’s been a while since I reviewed this. When the semester began my international finance teacher has us take a color personality type test that was a nice reminder of my strengths and weaknesses that can be worked on. It was also nice to see how the results may have changed since the last time I took those types of tests and how these (possibly) new strengths can be applied.

I doubt this will happen to any of you!

I doubt this will happen to any of you!


Before you begin college, and maybe once a year while in school, it would be good idea to take these tests and see if they’re accurate and if they can be applied to areas in your life. Allowing people to be lead by their strengths is especially important once you begin working in teams or on group projects. If it’s a long term group project, you could even suggest the entire taking one of these and deicing work that may best suit their predominant skills and help improve skills that could use strengthening.

Here’s a few websites that have free personality tests:
Color personality test:

http://365tests.com/personality-tests/free-color-personality-test/

What’s Your leadership Style:

http://psychology.about.com/library/quiz/bl-leadershipquiz.htm

What’s Your Learning Style:

http://www.educationplanner.org/students/self-assessments/learning-styles.shtml

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Notes From the 6 Train: Ultimate Organization

I just registered for my last semester of classes ever! Woo Hoo! (Well, possibly ever, who know what life has in store for me.) I am beginning to think about life after graduation, and what skills I’ve obtained while in school and what will continue to serve me after I graduate.

One of these primary skills that was introduced to me while in school, and I continue to prime, are my organizational skills.

At FIT, in the beginning of the year, you are given a free school planner. At most schools you are given planners, but FIT planners are particularly nice because it’s filled with student artwork and there’s a student club that designs the entire planner.

*this is not the FIT  planner, though.

*this is not the FIT planner, though.

At one point I used this planner religiously, and would make lists on the sticky notes littered throughout the planner.

I’ve now begun to explore options organizational options for me since I’m working on a litany of different projects. I’ve begun looking into the idea of the personal kanban. A kanban is “allows us to visualize the amount of work we have, and the way that work is carried out.” To make it personal one can simply pull it out of the public sphere and apply it to your personal life. The way that I’ve found works for me best is the whiteboard divided into three sections, “Backlog, In Progress, Completed.“ It works exceptionally well for me since I’m a visual and kinetic learner. Moving sticky notes from one section to another section and then off the board makes me pretty excited.

* I prefer color coated sticky notes.

* I prefer color coated sticky notes.

What about you? What skills have you perfected in school that apply to other areas of your life? Or, what ways do you help to organize your life?

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

If you want to learn more about the personal kanban you can check out http://www.personalkanban.com/pk/#sthash.v9hjhnHQ.dpuf).

You’re Here, Now What?

You’ve made it to New York!! Tall buildings, bright lights, how exciting! …Now what? All your friends and family are back home. Your roommate is kinda cool, but you two don’t exactly “click”. Despite New York’s reputation as one of the loneliest cities there are many ways to meet cool people!

If you are missing being an athlete and bonding with a team, you can look for inter-city sports teams. If venturing off-campus is a little too daunting for you, FIT also has classes anyone can attend including yoga, spin, kickboxing and open gyms for basketball.

A fantastic way to meet people and give back to your new home is by volunteering. Believe it or not, this megalithic city doesn’t just run itself. The City has a program set up to match volunteers with types of organizations they are interested in working with, like the environment, community/neighborhoods, health, education, etc. Volunteer Match is another organization that finds opportunities close to you (but you can also sort based on your interests).

New York is a city full of artists. If you want to expand your creativity or be inspired by others there are ample opportunities to see artists at work. A fun and safe environment to overcome stage fright is The Open Mic Downstairs – a great place to meet other actors, comedians, singers, etc. It is also only $3 if you want to just see talented people letting themselves go. If spoken word (with some comedy) is more your style “Bareburger Unplugged” is a place also meant to be a safe environment for artists to experiment, and they have some of the best organic burgers on the island. Another fun way to meet people is to go to a paint night.  Located all over the city, and almost every day, this is no pressure studio time (the paintings they give as the sample are more like guidelines I say).

It can be kind of awkward to start a conversation with a random person out of the blue, so the easiest way to do it is to have something to talk about right away, like something you have in common. The best way to have this is to attend events that are centered around shared interests. New York Comic Con is one of the biggest and most famous example, although tickets can cost hundreds of dollars and sell out within minutes. Meetup facilitates meetings of people with similar interests, and extend all through New York City, not just Manhattan. These groups are incredibly diverse with runners, a Capella singers, “foodie couples”, and Jewish parents of Astoria (I don’t know if that last one would apply to anyone reading this, but hey, FIT has an incredibly diverse student body!). The coolest “meetup” idea I’ve seen, which I totally want to try ASAP, is meal sharing. Eat With puts up times that chefs in your area are hosting dinner parties or cooking classes. Not only is it a great way to have a fantastic, authentic  meal, but it is an awesome resource for students who cannot get home for the holidays, but still want to have a group meal.

For even more ideas try Time Out NY. Do any of you have suggestions?

–Emily–

Apartment Hunting

If you have been keeping up with the blog, you’d know that I am planning on living off campus in an apartment next year.  I spent my entire spring break looking, having appointments, and well…stressing out.  Here are some tips that I have for those of you looking for apartments in the future:

  • Download StreetEasy: StreetEasy a website that lists apartments on the market in your area.  You can put in all of your criteria as far as budget, neighborhoods, amenities, etc.  It’s an incredible website and it also has an app so you can constantly be checking new listings, saving apartments to your favorites on your account, and reaching out to the buildings themselves.
  • Be prepared: Myself and my roommate didn’t use a broker because of the amounts of research that was done in advanced.  For a year now, I have been taking notes in my phone of buildings that I pass by and writing down their addresses to look up later.  While you don’t have to be constantly on the watch and taking notes for an entire year, it is good to not start from scratch, but StreetEasy also makes it simple if you don’t have a ton of apartment requirements.
  • Talk things out beforehand: While this may seem like common sense, be sure that everyone involved is on the same page with what you are looking for not only in an apartment but as a roommate as well.
  • Don’t compromise: Remain firm in what you want in an apartment.  If you know that you are going to be miserable commuting from the Upper East Side (6 to the S to the 1…no thank you), then don’t do it.  Half of the battle with going to school is getting there!  And if you are an Art & Design major, the supplies that you have to bring with you can make a simple commute 100000x worse, especially at prime rush hour times.
  • Ask questions: Ask whomever you made the appointment with tons of questions!  Ask about what’s included in the rent, how long the rent would be, the application process, the necessary documents, if there have been any issues with bedbugs or cleanliness, the laundry room, and the environment of the building.  You don’t want to move in and be unhappy now, do you?

I hope these tips helped!  Feel free to ask any questions about apartments!

Ashley

Notes From the 6 Train: Light At the End of the Tunnel

So I am thoroughly excited to say that it is official. I am a DJ. At this point, within the past two weeks I have had two (very successful) gigs!

This is my mid semester pep talk for everyone who is in the midst of the murky waters of creation. Whether it’s a working on a line, or photography project or even still figuring out where you’re going to school (are seniors still doing that?). When I talk about creation I do mean art, of course, but I also mean creating the life you want. For some that’s writing a thesis or like I said applying for schools, or scholarships or other programs/ opportunities. Sometimes the stamina to continue begins to falter, you worry if your (fill in the blank) is good enough, tall enough, colorful enough, etc. You have to trust yourself and your process.

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After weeks of practice, and knowing my music inside and out, I was still soo nervous at my first event. But once I hooked up my equipment, begin to spin and saw people reacting, hips swaying and arms flailing and people moving to the music I felt right at home. I felt confident and knew that I have found a new gift.

And afterwards, several people told me how great my set was and didn’t even know it was my gig. Even though that felt amazing, seeing everyone happy and dancing to the music that I played, I knew those late night sessions (this was during midterms, so I had so much work) staying up to work my craft was well worth it.

So when you’re in the middle of the process, and are beginning to fall asleep at your desk, or sewing machine or in front of the DJ controller (in my case) or you begin to feel frustrated remember, there is light on the there side!

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Notes From the 6 Train: Rockin’ Out With Recommendations

So, It’s that time of the year. Recommendation time that is.
(yay) I am always applying for a bunch of stuff. And am always in need of good recommendations. Here’s a few tips I’ve picked up along the way:

Like Brendan mentioned in his last post, begin building relationships with your teachers. This also means do well in class. This doesn’t mean that you have to get 100’s on every assignment, but stay engaged in class and try. This will encourage the professor to not just write the letter for you, but will do it happily because they want you to be successful.

-That leads me to my next point, ask someone who will actually write nicely about you, the professor of the class that you feel asleep in a few times? Probably not the best person to ask.

-Be sure to ask with enough time, don’t do it 2 days before the letter is needed.

-Do the work for them. Send them the info and your resume so that information to pull from. they are doing you a favor, don’t make it more labor intensive for them then it has to be.

-Sometimes you have to do some ground work. For a scholarship I just applied for I had to literally track down my teacher and wait by the door for one of her classes to finish to get her signature (she sent the recommendations via email but they weren’t considered valid without her signature)

-Know that who you chose to get the recommendation whether it’s a professor, faculty member or former boss, may change depending on the position or type of recommendation you need.

-Finally, be sure to thank them. Once again, they’re doing you a favor and professors are busy just like everyone else, so appreciate that they’ve taken their time to help you out.

Here’s a catchy tune to help you remember:

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.