Category Archives: Academics

Last Semester Goals

Hi everyone!

This week was the first week of my last semester at FIT.  It has both flown by and taken forever to get here!  I’m sad and excited at the same time.  I have been a student for the past 15 or so years of my life – and while I hope to never stop learning, it will be different no longer being enrolled in classes or working towards graduation.  So, I would like to make the most of this semester!  Below are some goals:

  1. Use my student resources more

FIT has amazing labs, computer programs and resources for students, and I regret not using them more!  I’d like to spend some time in the sewing lab, making something!  Additionally, FIT provides the Adobe creative suite free to students, which is super expensive otherwise.  Before I lose access to it I would like to refine my skills more by creating more personal projects in Adobe Illustrator, and finally learning how to effectively use Photoshop.

2. Keep my GPA up

I will admit, since I already have my post-grad job lined up the motivation to have a good GPA has dropped.  However, I would like to still do my best!  Even though GPA is truly just a number, there is satisfaction in trying for the highest number.  I’m going to work away at my studies and homework for my own personal GPA goal.

3. Balance

Since I am working full time this semester, as well as finishing my FIT degree I would like to try to be balanced in my life.  In past semesters I have let my social life slide in order to accommodate work and school, but I’d like to leave a weekend day for fun every week.  Wether it’s going out for dinner or a movie night with friends, just forcing time to be not working and not studying.

What are your goals for this semester?  Let me know!

Sam

Minoring Strategically

Hi everyone!

FIT has so many great minors available for students to work towards during their time at school here. From Ethics and Sustainability, to Dance, and foreign languages, you can dive into topics of interest to you outside your major’s course requirements.

There are two main ways to work on a minor – one is choosing one that compliments the classes required for your major, and the second is picking something you are interested in and feel will better round out your education.

The first approach requires looking at the required classes for your major – for example, my program (Production Management) entails taking Macro and Micro economics. This is essentially 40% of a minor in Economics, built into the classes you already have to take anyways. Additionally, most degrees require two foreign language classes. This means by taking three more you can obtain the minor in the language of your choice.

The second approach might take more planning. I would recommend looking over the classes for your degree and the classes for the minor with your academic advisor. There may be some classes that fulfill the same SUNY requirement – for example, instead of taking Quantitative Mathematics I took Math Modeling. Both met the SUNY standards, which meant that I no longer needed to take Quantitative Mathematics. There may be some classes for a minor that you can swap in instead of the suggested class for your major. Again, working with your academic advisor and reviewing your DARs degree audit report can help you find these areas of overlap!

More than anything, I would suggest starting your minor early. I had started a minor in Japanese my Sophomore year but ended up running out of time in my schedule. With language classes they usually build upon each other, so sequencing and timing is very important!

What do you want to minor in?

Sam

Becoming a Part Time Student

Hi everyone,

It’s my last week of being a full time college student!  My last semester, Spring 2020, I will be only taking 2 classes at FIT.  I’m really excited to have more time in my schedule to work, and start a full time job hopefully.

During my last few years at FIT I had tried to stack classes and knock out as much as possible, and as I looked at my upcoming classes needed for senior year I realized I could be part time my last semester.  Full time is 12+ credits, typically 4 or so classes, and part time is 11 and a half credits a semester and below.  Instead of paying a lump sum for a semester, part time students pay per credit taken.  Next semester I have two classes, which are 6 credits total.  I had done a lot of classes ahead so if I needed to make anything up to graduate on time I could, but the side benefit of paying less this last semester is pretty sweet.

This option isn’t for everyone (some scholarships and aid require you to be full time), but for me it worked out perfectly and I am excited for the flexibility it brings.  If I get hired at a company I am able to work full time.  It will be nice to cushion the transition from college to working after graduation.  And who needs free time anyways?

At the end of the day, I think it’s always important to be looking for ways to help yourself!  Wether it is taking extra classes, spacing out classes, getting tough subjects for you out of the way, or taking a semester off, see how you can make your college experience the best for YOU.

Sam

 

Internship Class at FIT

Hi everyone!

Ever wonder what it is like taking the internship class at FIT? I have done it twice (once in my Associates degree and once in Bachelors), and will share a bit about it below!

Why take the internship class?
In New York State, work must be compensated. This means that you either need to be paid or receive credit in exchange for the work you do at an internship.

Receiving pay at an internship might take some advancement in your career or academics (they are more competitive) which leaves interning for credit as the usual starting place for some students. My first official internship was unpaid, which meant I had to take the FIT internship class to receive school credit while I did it. I had to work my part time job on the side, so it wasn’t ideal, but having it on my resume really did help me land future paid positions so I think it was a worthy tradeoff.

How do you get the internship?
Once registering for the class, you will meet with your internship counselor. This person will help you find a position and fill out the appropriate paperwork, but at the end of the day you will do all the legwork of applying, interviewing and co-ordinating. This is all part of the learning process too in my opinion, as it is pretty similar to what it’s like when you apply for a job outside of school. I’m a big fan of the FIT database of internships though, as it narrows down the field to companies looking to hire YOU!

What do you learn?
As you are required to spend 121 cumulative hours (this does vary depending on the exact internship class) on the “job site,” the actual class itself only meets 6 times over the semester as a touch base and career development opportunity. This means you spend about 10 hours a week (roughly a day and a half, but some people do more) at the office you intern in, and every third week or so you have the class.

In those 6 class meetings, you go over things like office etiquette, interviewing tips, resume workshops and sometimes have guest speakers. The instructor also has your back at your internship – if anything goes wrong, FIT can step in and help make things right. However this is rare and more insurance that you have a good experience than anything else.

Is it worth it?
Well, if your degree requires it, yes! And even if it doesn’t, taking the class can help you better determine what you are interested in while you are still in school, so after graduation you have a better picture of what you really want to do. Working for “free” can be tough sometimes, but it also forced me to try and get the most out of it possible. I asked lots of questions, did lots of snooping, and got a better idea of what actually happens in an office. Also, earning 3 credits while working was a fun change from instead sitting a classroom three hours a week for a semester.

Overall, the internship class at FIT was a good way to get my foot in the industry door, and gave me more confidence to search on my own. After interning my 4th semester (Sophomore year), I got an offer to intern at Guess in LA. I credit a lot of that to having the chance to add to my resume and improve my communication skills with the internship class. You never know what will lead to your next move!

Where do you want to intern?
Sam

Senioritis – Dealing With It

As we are nearing the end of the semester with only one month left of school, I am falling into the classic “senioritis” tendencies. This entire semester I have let my time and work management skills slip and it has had its consequences. I have not been keeping track of what projects are due or when their deadlines are, and I have been doing the homework just to get it done, not to learn from it. This is really unfortunate because if I take a step back, I can see that I am in a really exciting part of my time at FIT and I am not allowing myself to enjoy it.

This is a time when I should be pulling together all of the skills I’ve learned here at FIT and to practice them at their full potential. Instead, I’ve had this mindset that I am “done” with my academics and that I am ready to enter the industry full-time. While it might be true that I am ready and able to work full-time, it doesn’t mean that I should brush aside my schooling.

The first 3 years at FIT taught me all of the technical knowledge that I need to know, but this last year is about putting that knowledge to use. It is about how well you understand the information and how well you can put it into effect. It is also aimed at a managerial role, so this is a year where I can look past where I’ll be when I enter the work force and project myself to a higher position. This allows for a rare chance that I probably won’t have for several years where I can get in a managerial mindset and play out how certain decision affect a company and the work that ensues for the teams that I will be a part of in the real world.

I lost my source of motivation because I thought I had reached the end goal, but I still have lessons to learn in my last year. I need to change my thinking to allow for growth from my remaining classes, because it would truly be a shame if I or anyone went through their last year and wasted it.

 

Have you ever experienced “senioritis”? How did you deal with it?