Tag Archives: ITM

Phone Interviews & Gladys Marcus Library

Hi there,

Yesterday I was interviewed via phone for a Production and Sourcing Internship at Ann Inc. Today I have my second round of phone interviews with the person that will eventually be my superior if they hire me (since I’m in DR they’d rather do this than wait until I get back to NYC). If the title throws you a bit off (it’s normal, seems pretty unrelated) I’m here to explain how I have used one of our most fabulous web resources. But first, I’ll share some tips I’ve gathered online and from previous professors about interviewing over the phone:

  1. When you do phone interviews it’s like you are cheating, because you can actually wear what you want, something that makes you feel comfortable and reassure you (I had an Ann Taylor shirt, haha I know just felt right and sweats).
  2. Always stand, your voice comes out better and sounds more energized. SMILE I swear it projects a positive image and completely changes the tone of your voice.
  3. Be near a desk, here you can keep your resume at hand, a list of your skills and what you bring to this position and also a list of your “weaknesses” (always something that can be taken as positive aka I’m tenacious, great article here)
  4. Lock yourself in a room where you can’t be interrupted, this includes turning off call waiting (I seriously had my mom scream GOOOOOOAL yesterday LOL when Argentina finally scored during the world cup, I almost DIED haha)
  5. Landlines are more convenient and have less tendency to drop than cellphones.
  6. Enunciate clearly and speak slowly (take a deep breath when they speak, remember they can’t see you).
  7. Do NOT interrupt. Wait for your turn. Ask them questions.
  8. Take notes after or during to recall the interview for future references.
  9. Follow up with a thank you email.

Now about our “not your typical library” (you will see more of why when you visit us, because you can eat and drink and talk in our main floor, SAY WHAT?! Yes). The Gladys Marcus Library consists of three floors full of what can only be described as a world of fashion knowledge above and beyond what you can imagine. PrintFX_3D_Gown

  • We have one of the foremost fashion library collections.
  • The library supports the academic and research needs of programs in Art and Design, Business and Technology, Liberal Arts and our Graduate School.
  • Through SUNY’s Open Access Policy our students have access to and borrowing privileges at all other SUNY libraries.
  • We have some of the most historical collection of magazines such as Vogue dating back to 1929.
  • As an online resource that I always use for interviews you have the databases to do company in-depth research (Hoovers is your BFF) where I learned almost everything about ANN Inc.
  • The nerdiest part that I absolutely love is the TEXT A LIBRARIAN. FIT provides you a phone number where you can text the librarian to help you if you are lost in the stacks or to check if we have a certain book available.

Anyways wish me luck at getting this internship and be sure to check the library out! Tons of magazines, trend forecasting books, special exhibitions, movies to rent for FREE and helpful staff.

library

Carpe Diem,

Sadie

 

Language Advantage

Merhaba Peeps,

I hope someone is still there (I’ve been gone too long, I’m SORRY). I was gone two weeks on a Mediterranean cruise with my mom, as an early graduation gift. I did try posting twice but it really wasn’t working (or cost-effective for that matter, oops). I’m back in Rome for the time being and I’m going to explore the eternal city once again and maybe even for the last time in my life (hopefully not).the-computer-demands-a-blog

I just wanted to share with you how important it is to speak more than one language, I cannot stress it enough how it will come in handy all throughout your life. OK, so from what I’ve gathered Americans assume everyone speaks English (not everyone obvs) , and I heard that the English do that too (eeerghh that annoying buzz sound in game shows). Through my travels in Turkey, Greece and Italy I discovered that even if English is the main international business language, the best baklava seller in Turkey might not care about that fact (oh how yummy it was). I also noticed that some people are predisposed to you as a customer and a human being, as soon as you just slap a HI or Thank You without even trying their native tongue (Efharisto: thanks in Greek). I also found Hard Rock Cafe in Istanbul (newly opened, known by a handful of people) on a pure coincidence because the girl sitting next to me turned out to speak Spanish and work at HR in one of the most prominent hotels of the area and took us on a tour because she wanted to practice her Spanish (kid you NOT). Anyways, you get the gist of it, language was not meant to be a barrier, do not let it scare you. It is the gateway to understanding other cultures, other countries, other ways of thinking. Besides, eavesdropping in four different languages can be quite fun (especially when they are talking about you, unkindly) and you respond… followed by a jaw drop!

So when you are questioning the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures and why FIT requires two language courses think of all my stories and all the stories you could have. Think about all the doors it will open for you and all the resumes your resume will crush (Languages: English, (Fill in the blank). These classes were designed to make you thrive in an ever-changing global environment. If you feel they are too intimidating you can wait until your Bachelors (that is when they are required), and if not you can start in your Associates and maybe even minor in a Foreign Language. FIT offers: French, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish. If English is not your main language we also offer ESL programs throughout the year. Oh and don’t fret,  it is very interactive because we have a state-of-the-art Foreign Language Multimedia Center!tahnks

A presto,

Sadie

(I promise not to ever leave for so long again. I missed you all, I mean that is hoping someone reads me haha)

deans list latest

Dean’s List

That envelope was my unexpected reward for a year full of hard work (I mean it, just because it is fashion it doesn’t mean it’s less demanding). When my mom called to tell me I had been mailed a diploma back home I couldn’t wait for her to tell me what it was. I really had no idea, what the Dean’s List was when she told me I’d been on it for the year 2011-2012. Subsequently I dug through the FIT website and was able to find more info that today I will share with you (what a lucky bunch). I hope one day this envelope might surprise you or that you become aware of its existence and strive for this achievement. 622464_10150952080156751_1685140454_o

I’m in the The Jay and Patty Baker School of Business and Technology, and our Dean is Steven Frumkin(awesome, super intelligent man). At the end of each semester, the Dean’s list is posted and it honors students who have completed more than 12 credits and have achieved a GPA of 3.5 or better. To find the latest list (fall 2013) click here and then select your major.

970150_10151491944021751_437271836_nAfter my first recognition I can proudly say, I’ve been on the list every semester. I leave you all with an inspiring quote:

“The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra.”
Jimmy Johnson

Carpe DIem,

Sadie

 

 

 

Scholarship Opportunities

Ciao Peeps,

How many of you would believe me if I told you my first real interview was with 7 executives at a round table in FIT? (yeah, completely intimidating) What if I also told you I was the main focal point, the head of the table, and one of the first candidates to be interviewed? (biting your lip already? so was I). Turns out this is a true story, and a great one too (be the judge).

It was a rainy day, I was late and I only had two classes for the day so I decided sweatpants would do (not that kind of judgement haha), a very last-minute outfit decision that turned out to be a very practical one. After my first class, I casually decide to pick up some pamphlets from a table which turn out to be scholarship opportunities. I quickly dismissed it because I had heard that it was really hard to get one if you are an international student. As I turned to leave the classroom something kept pulling me back towards the stack of papers, so I did. Reading through the requisites I realized I met all of them and was very pleased with myself (ya know).  While folding the paper to take it home and give it further consideration I glanced at the due date, which was that day at 3:00 PM (no joke, wish I was kidding). A minute went by, then two, then three and I still hadn’t moved. I mean, if I had picked it up that same day it had to mean something (anything really, coincidences strike me as odd) and I could not bear to live with regret.

Running down to the computer lab to write my resume, cover letter, motivational letter and extracurricular activities I felt like I was part of the apprentice (so little time, so much to do). My future depended on the words I wrote but thankfully inspiration and passion were flowing out of me (this girl is on fiiiiire) and took over my body. For the next few hours I was there, but I also was buying CD’s at the bookshop to electronically submit my documents, asking a professor if he could write a recommendation letter on the spot, and buying manila envelopes for the hard copies (hooray for sweatpants, right?). At 2:58 PM I ran into the ITM office with my submission, and Nicole the lovely secretary welcomed me with “Good, you made it right on time.” Granted, I missed my second class, but the experience was just exhilarating.

Sometime later I heard back and I had been chosen as a candidate for 2 of the 3 scholarships I applied to. The follow through consisted of an interview with board members, industry leaders and your Chairperson (as if it wasn’t scary enough). Each person had 15 minutes to be grilled in the “board room” (it really wasn’t that bad, I was just so nervous I got all hot). The first one was for Ralph Lauren at FIT and I was pacing through the hallway so fast I thought they would hear me coming. Long story short, I didn’t get it and it was disappointing. Hours later I was still dissecting every second of the interview to find out what went wrong. Until this day I don’t really know but I remember they wanted to know exactly what I wanted to do with my life and what my future plans were. I had no concrete idea, other than finishing school (because this world is full of opportunities), so I was honest and told them that (was it wise? NO. would I do it again? YES).

Luckily when my second interview came around at the Tommy Hilfiger HQ in NYC, I was more prepared (or so I thought). When I walked into their huge conference room, I decided to enjoy my time and do what I loved best (obvs you know by now it’s talking about myself haha). When the same question came around, I gave them the same answer, yet this time they were as thrilled as I was about an immense ocean of infinite possibilities. As we sat there and discussed almost everything you could imagine, I felt it was more a conversation than an interview and it was when I realized I really love my major. ITM  gave me all the confidence I needed to discuss global issues with my interviewers (I was more knowledgeable than I even knew).

Long story short I got it! The feeling you get when someone else sees your passion and believes in you, is unique. I know you have heard it before, but when it’s meant to be, it will be. (Example: I found out later that one of the board members was a breast cancer survivor, and kid you not, the same way something was pulling me towards picking up those papers, something pulled me towards wearing my blazer with the pink ribbon I had received months ago and kept on it. She asked me about it and I went into full detail about how I donated my hair without knowing a single thing about her.) If that’s not enough for you to believe that things will happen when they are supposed to, I’m not really sure what would be.

Scholarship Recipient text

Carpe Diem,

Sadie

 

Mola Mola Mola!

Despite what my pictures may suggest, I am actually taking a class while here in Panama. The class is the International Trade and Marketing Practicum. Yes, I get three credits for laying on the beach, swimming in the Caribbean Sea and eating fish pulled fresh out of the ocean. However, we also spend entire days visiting fashion showrooms, logistics centers and talking to Free Trade Zone experts. The final project was started before we even left New York. We each got to choose our topic and then had to do some secondary research before arriving in Panama. Because I am not an ITM major, I focused more on the textiles of the traditional Panamanian culture: the mola. Luckily for me, FIT’s library has some of the best references for textiles in the world.

Molas originated in the Guna Yala region of Panama which is the archipelago of San Blas on the northeastern coast of the country. Before the invasion of the Spanish colonists, the Guna natives (also called the Kuna or Cuna) did not wear clothes and instead painted incredibly intricate and colorful figures on their bodies. Because of the similarities of reports from Lionel Wafer in 1609 it is believed that the molas were simply adaptations of the way the natives used to adorn themselves before the Spanish colonists were shocked by the nudity and required them to cover up.

Molas are made and sold by a huge number of natives who travel to Panama City to sell the wares. Girls usually learn how to sew molas at the age of six or seven. Amazingly, the tradition of the mola has survived centuries and almost all Guna women still dress in the historic way. This means that a panel is sewn as a rectangle and then sewn onto fabric that makes the chest and sleeves of a shirt.

The mola on the left is from a few decades ago, and the mola on the right is the way a modern mola would look with more modern fabric used for the shirting

Molas are made by layering several pieces of fabric of different colors. Then, the artist will decide upon her design and carefully cut away each layer revealing the color of the layers beneath it. Then each edge is painstakingly folded under and held in place with tiny stitches.

Every mola is handmade and no two molas ever look the same. Molas can be purely geometric or figural. The imagery used in molas is not very significant to the culture. Guna women simply reflect the world they see around them in their art. Because of this fish, birds and humans are popular motifs in molas.

My favorite example of Guna women putting what they see in the world around them into their molas

Molas are an integral and distinct part of the Guna native culture and luckily, shows no sign of dying out.

–Emily–