ΜΟΔΑ IS FASHION (2): On Stavrinos

By Richard Montañez, Monday, March 21, 2022

Except for Brad Hamann’s biography Moonfall (2010), and a series of video interviews with his sisters, not too much has been published about Greek American fashion illustrator George Stavrinos (1948-1990). He was born as the last of seven to parents who immigrated from Greece to near Boston in March 1948. Rising to great success in the 1970s and 80s, Stavrinos died of AIDS related complications in August 1990 at a hospital in New York City. Today, FIT’s Special Collections and College Archives (SPARC) houses some fourteen of his original illustrations which entered SPARC through his friend, FIT Illustration Professor Rosemary Torre. Other original Stavrinos illustrations are kept at the Leslie Lohman Museum of Art.

“My parents gave us a very European upbringing. … I went to Greek school after regular American school, where we were taught to read and write Greek … I served as an altar boy for seven years in the Greek Orthodox Church.” (Stavrinos, in an interview with Nathan Fain, 1978).

Well known in the world of commercial fashion illustration, Stavrinos produced works for the likes of Bergdorf Goodman, Barney’s, and The New York Times. He also crafted illustrations for Gentlemen Quarterly and Blueboy, referencing classic images of gay American erotica and lifestyle, often through representations of archetypal masculinity and handsomeness. Stavrinos visited relatives in Heraklion in Crete on at least one occasion in 1969 and 1970 before he moved permanently to New York City in 1973. Throughout his career, Stavrinos produced several illustrations for magazines that were marketed toward gay men, openly referencing his own sexuality in a time of intense discrimination against LGBTQ+ people.

The illustration that I chose from his oeuvre is of a figure in a Charlotte Neuville suit, particularly because it is so androgynous in appearance. The illustration is from 1989. The work is a testament to Stavrinos’ ability to confidently navigate different kinds of fashion and advertising spaces and their attitudes toward queerness or mixed gender expression. Not only does the figure emulate queerness through the garment they are wearing, but they also are sporting a non-conformist hairstyle which pushes this narrative further. This is particularly interesting when considering ideas about masculinity and homosexuality that can be traced all the way back to ancient Greece, a prominent part of Stavrinos’ heritage.

Fig. 1. Female figure in suit by Charlotte Neuville: suit jacket has four square buttons, For Lord & Taylor, Signed, 1989. Stavrinos, George, “Charlotte Neuville Suit,” SPARC Digital, accessed March 20, 2022, https://sparcdigital.fitnyc.edu/items/show/2666.
Fig. 2 Archaic Kouros from Greece, c. 590-580 BCE, marble from Naxos. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1932 (32.11.1). The exact circumstances of the discovery of the kouros are unknown. The kouros was owned by German collector Jacob Hirsch (1874-155) and has traces of original paint.

In his illustrations of both men and women, he utilized sources of inspiration such as Minoan, Archaic and Classical Greek sculptures and standards of beauty, which, at least for men, have been reproduced, reused, and recoded into gay culture for as long as homosexuality has existed. To my mind come the many surviving statues of Kouroi (young men), excavated in Greece and now on display in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. One can almost imagine Stavrinos, who lived in a studio on a top floor corner apartment on 76 West 86th Street near Manhattan’s Central Park for many years, walking to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to draw the Greek kouros on display here since 1931.

Fig. 3 Stavrinos, third from the right, with friends in 1978. From Nathan Fain, “George Stavrinos, Illustrator,” Christopher Street, November 1978, 16-25. FIT Library, Fashion File-Illustrators – Folder Stavrinos, George.

Stavrinos’ images, particularly in erotica, can often depict displays of power, dominance, and in certain cases, invitation, which can change depending on the viewer and their own perception or fantasy of the image of the model. In this case, with a more femme-presenting figure, it becomes especially clear that they are purposely constructed to be more stoic or solid in appearance to emulate a certain kind of masculinity within women.

In 21st century contexts, we now have a clear understanding that menswear or references to menswear are not automatically indicative of power and agency within anyone, but Stavrinos’ illustrations exude timelessness regardless. In considering what were more personal aspects about his life and why he drew the subjects that he did, the subtle choices that were made in his commercial works are reminders of the influence queer life had on him during his lifetime and how they inspired him to continue working.

Fig. 4 The author with the Stavrinos illustration set in FIT’s SPARC in March 2022.

Acknowledgments:

I am grateful to April Callahan, Curator of Manuscript Collections and Associate at the Special Collections Library, Gladys Marcus Library at FIT, who facilitated access to the original drawings of Stavrinos housed at SPARC.

Further Reading:

Hamann, Brad. Moonfall. The Life and Art of George Stavrinos. Based on the author’s M.F.A. Visual Arts Graphic Design thesis at Marywood University, 2010. During his lifetime, a group of Stavrinos’ artworks went on display for a retrospective at Marywood University in 1988.

Fain, Nathan. “George Stavrinos, Illustrator,” Christopher Street, November 1978, 16-25.

Kaltsas, Nikos. Sculpture in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2002.

Richter, Gisela and Irma Richter. “The Archaic ‘Apollo’ in the Metropolitan Museum.” Metropolitan Museum Studies, 5 (1934–1936), 20–57.

Stavrinos. Clarity of Vision. Stavrinos’ sisters Venetia, Sandra and Debbie talk about the love and admiration they had for their brother (the video is accessible here).

About the Author:

Richard Montañez is a senior in the AHMP program at FIT. His interests include queer art history, the decolonization of museums, and curatorial artists.

Current Favorite Reading or Art Exhibition: “Faith Ringgold: American People” The New Museum, 02/17/22-06/05/22.

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