Notes From the 6 Train: Visiting The People Climate Art Collective

Marchers make their way across Central Park South during the People's Climate March on September 21 2014, in New York. Activists mobilized in cities across the globe Sunday for marches against climate change, with one of the biggest planned for New York, where celebrities, political leaders and tens of thousands of people were expected. The march comes before the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon convenes a climate change summit of 120 world leaders .   AFP PHOTO/Timothy A. Clary        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Marchers make their way across Central Park South during the People’s Climate March on September 21 2014, in New York. Activists mobilized in cities across the globe Sunday for marches against climate change, with one of the biggest planned for New York, where celebrities, political leaders and tens of thousands of people were expected. The march comes before the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon convenes a climate change summit of 120 world leaders . AFP PHOTO/Timothy A. Clary (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

The other day as apart of my summer internship with the Laundromat Project I visited and connected with several artists from The People’s Climate Art Collective. Remember that massive march that took place last year against climate change? If you attended, I’m sure you remember how much rad art there was. I couldn’t go because I had to work, but I know several who did go AND saw many photos from the March, and just from that I saw how the role art played in the march.

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This past year’s onslaught of viral videos of brutally has been particularly challenging for me. I often think about the importance of art in freedom movements and why it’s so necessary. It’s because people don’t need degrees or even need to be literate to understand certain imagery, and that’s powerful stuff. In fact, the organizers talked about how intentional they were making art a primary factor of the march from the beginning of the planning days. So it was incredible to hear that the major funders of the march believed in it also & provided money to artist to help make signs, do performance art, etc.

Demonstrators make their way down Sixth Avenue in New York during the People's Climate March Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014.  The march, along with similar gatherings scheduled in other cities worldwide, comes two days before the United Nations Climate Summit, where more than 120 world leaders will convene for a meeting aimed at galvanizing political will for a new global climate treaty by the end of 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Demonstrators make their way down Sixth Avenue in New York during the People’s Climate March Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014. The march, along with similar gatherings scheduled in other cities worldwide, comes two days before the United Nations Climate Summit, where more than 120 world leaders will convene for a meeting aimed at galvanizing political will for a new global climate treaty by the end of 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

This intersection of art + activism made me think of the plethora of artists here at FIT. It’s interesting how the skills learned here are completely transferable, one could be working at a design firm, fashion magazine or freedom fighter, but it all starts with a solid base and understanding of how to communicate messages through art.

All Things Color, Love & Fashion,
Ayanna Lane