The Best DIY Halloween Costume: You



Hey guys and ghouls! It’s the Halloween season, a time to celebrate individuality, theatricality, and plain old absurdity. What better time to experiment with new styles, based on some of your favorite icons? Make every look a costume! Treat your wardrobe like it’s a Halloween pop-up store, not a uniform factory!

It has been four classes and one field trip into my weekly Sunday odyssey at FIT’s Precollege Program. It’s time for a new post that might send shivers up the skinny jeans of the fashion-conservative, while making us fashion deviants scrounge the shelves of the nearest thrift shop within seconds.

Who are you supposed to be? Are you the winner of the costume contest, or are you just another stray cat?

My Product Development class has gotten me thinking about how an individual’s fashion choices come together to create a character. At a certain point, our fashion becomes our costume; we are not referred to by name or number, but by “girl-with-heavy-contour-and-heels-she-can’t-walk-in.”

On my first day of class at FIT, the professor started the course by going around the room and having each student say where they shop. In the context of a Product Development class, this is only logical; our goal is to meet the wants and needs of the common buyer, and what better way to learn what average buyers seek than by studying the models of successful stores? From a business standpoint, we can extract the popular stores’ models by placing their products in terms of the Pyramid; no, not Abby Lee Miller’s pyramid- the Product Development Pyramid.


On a more personal level, this class discussion led me to consider what contributes to an individual’s style. I know what stores my peers shop at, but what brought them into that store? What has influenced their fashion sense? Who are their style icons? What did they first see that subconsciously caused them to believe that this store is the best reflection of them?

To best answer these questions, I will discuss the influences and influencers of the character whose style I know best: myself.

My style icons are mainly renowned for their bold and theatrical aesthetics. I’m very passionate about music, so most of them happen to be musicians (the context of which their dramatic aesthetics are fitting). I’ve listed a few below, along with some key examples of signature looks that should say it all:

FKA Twigs
(FKA Twigs, reposted from,,, and

Gwen Stefani
(Gwen Stefani, reposted from, © Mark Ferguson/Rex via,,

Marina Diamandis
(Marina Diamandis, reposted from,,, and

Nicole Richie
(Nicole Richie, reposted from Nicole Richie for House of Harlow 1960 by Vijat Mohindra via,,, and

Stevie Nicks
(Stevie Nicks, reposted from,,, and

St. Vincent
(St. Vincent, reposted from, © Ben Hassett for Harper’s Bazaar,, and

Aside from public figures, I also draw a lot of the inspiration for my aesthetic from other media, like movies and TV shows. Sound similar to choosing a Halloween costume? For example, I’m greatly influenced by the aesthetic of 90s cult films like Clueless (1995) and Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion (1997), as well as Tim Burton movies like Coraline (2009) and Edward Scissorhands (1990). I love wearing hyper-feminine 90s-style crushed velvet and chokers whenever possible, and I love to style it in as whimsical a tone as possible. The theatricality! I also really love the look and feel of old school low budget films, like the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974). It doesn’t get spookier than that! Various television characters, for example Fran Fine from The Nanny and Samantha from Sex and the City, as well as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (QUEEN of wearing the same outfit for thirty years), have also contributed to my look. It sounds funny, but I also find unlikely inspiration from nonhuman characters like Betty Boop, Jessica Rabbit, and Miss Piggy. The more imaginary, the better! What can I say? It’s a concept!

(Miss Piggy, reposted from







(Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion, reposted from







(Texas Chainsaw Massacre, reposted from








(Fran Fine from The Nanny, reposted from










(Samantha Jones from Sex and the City, reposted from

To best express the influence of such nouns (people, places, things) on my vibe and aesthetic, I shop mainly at local and online boutiques (mainly for statement pieces, which would fall under the top “fashion” part of the pyramid).

These stores include:

~Buffalo Exchange (locations all over the U.S., including five in NY, one being a block away from FIT in Chelsea at 114 W 26th St)
~Dolls Kill (
~Fashion Nova (
~Free People (, locations all over the U.S., Canada, and U.K.)
~House of Harlow 1960 (
~Mystique Boutiqe NYC (, locations in Manhattan and Long Island)
~Nasty Gal (
~Ruby and Jenna (, locations in NY and NJ)
~So Aesthetic Shop ( ~ use the promo code “Harmony” for 10% off
~Twenty5A (, located on Long Island)

Where will you buy your daily costumes? Will you mix-and-match and DIY, or will you choose a prepackaged number off the wall? What character will you be? Will you masquerade as the most convenient persona, or will you take the time to develop the best product, a conglomerate of all your favorite icons and influences- you? Creep in the comment section below and tell your tale!

Join me next week as we continue to “Liv” On The Edge of true enterprising artistry, brought to you by FIT’s Precollege Program!


Lights, Camera, Action!


In this week’s amazing blog I decided to write about inspiration, because any artist knows that the worst thing is the terrible, no good, and dreaded ARTIST BLOCK. Here are some simple tips to avoid the dreaded ARTIST BLOCK.

This might sound silly, but you should watch movies and surf the internet for your idol. For example, when I’m drawing fashion designs I watch old movies and look at pictures of my idols: Audrey Hepburn, Anna Wintour, Jackie O., and who can forget Coco Chanel.

If you’re not doing fashion designs; look at things that interest you such as food, beaches, even your own backyard. Sometimes, it helps just to do nothing. It may sound weird that I am saying to do nothing. When I say “do nothing” I mean scroll through pics on Instagram, look at snapchat, and facebook. Our generation has so many social media apps it is pretty hard not to find something to draw.

Once for a class I was assigned to design a skateboard. I had gotten ARTIST BLOCK… but then after staring at my phone I got the best idea! Why don’t I make the iphone screen the front of my skateboard. My skateboard eiphone picnded up being super cool.

If nothing comes to you, try listening to music. The song could have a meaning to you and might remind you of someone you know. This may cause you to draw things that person enjoys.

Try drawing what you’re feeling, you never know it might just be your best drawing. It is also great therapy. The simplest feeling such as sadness is a great example. Picasso painted a whole period of blues just to show how he was feeling.

The hardest thing to find inspiration for is photography, because you want your photo to express yourself. It is also really hard because you might want to try something and it reality is just that it is not working out. For example, when you want to take a picture of someone jumping, and you don’t to get them until they are already on the ground. You want the
in the air! So when taking a photo try timing it out. Just take pictures of things that interest you and that could be anything.

Comment how you find inspiration. Also tell me if I helped you. Thanks for reading and until next time!


Hangouts and Whereabouts

My Train to FIT

My Train to FIT

Saturday, what a great day, it just so happens to be my favorite day. My day to myself, and my day to do what I want, when I want; everything else can wait until Sunday.  On Saturday mornings I start my best day off right. There’s no waking up on the wrong side of the bed on Saturdays when my alarm clock goes off at 7:24! Getting up so early in order to arrive FIT in time and also have the time to grab a coffee with my friend that travels with me by 9:15 isn’t always easy, but so worth it. Coming from Queens, I get dropped off at a small train station by my house; sometimes this is where I grab my first cup of coffee. As an avid coffee drinker, there is no such thing as too much coffee.

As soon as my train pulls into Penn Station, I go into mad dash mode; got to get that coffee. The hustle down to my favorite spot around FIT is one of excitement.  If you’re looking for the best cup of coffee on all of 7th avenue, head to Gregory’s Coffee. Better than Starbucks (which is also en route to FIT), Gregory’s sells all different types of coffee, from Macchiato to café Americano.  My personal favorites from Gregory’s are the caramel macchiatos, and their to die for chocolate chip cookies.

Gregory's Caramel Macchiato

Gregory’s Caramel Macchiato

On my first day of class at FIT, having an art supply store (Barnes and Nobles) on campus came in handy. A great tip that may come in handy before your first class at FIT would be to check your student FIT account to make sure that any and all supplies required for the class are in your possession, beforehand. Something as simple as having all the supplies you need as soon as you need them is so rewarding and beneficial because you could focus on your artwork, without the hassle of have to pick up the supplies late. My Professor was very understanding and did not require me to visit Barnes and Nobles but, if you can while at FIT, make use of the on campus supplies.

Breaks at FIT are about 15 minutes long, just enough time to make it across 7th avenue to buy more coffee (usually  where I end up going), or to buy a snack. Usually during breaks, my friends Sofia and Rachel and I make our way down to Dunkin Donuts on the other side of the street.

A restaurant that is worth trying near FIT is called Brgr. A healthy alternative to junk food, with the same great taste; Brgr only serves grass-fed meat. Known for not just their grass-fed cow jokes hanging across the walls, Brgr serves the best shakes around FIT. If you are a student taking two classes at FIT and you are wondering where to try for a great lunch, visit Brgr.

These are my favorite chill out spots this spring at FIT. I hope these come in handy; whether you’re in the mood for a burger or just some early morning coffee.

Thank you for reading this week!

Yours Truly,


How To Make Friends At FIT

Hello readers! Happy Thanksgiving! As this holiday comes closer and closer, I am thinking about everything I’m thankful for. One of the things I am most thankful for are my friendships. My friends are so important to me and they inspire me so much! In the past weeks at FIT, I’ve bonded with my classmates over having to lay low on Friday nights so we can wake up early on Saturdays, our love for New York, and our passion for the fashion industry. I now consider my classmates as my friends because of this. When I started at FIT, making friends was what I was most nervous for, but it was actually very easy! Here are some of my tips for making friends at FIT (and in other situations too):

Complement Outfits

  • If you like what someone is wearing, tell them! We’re all fashion students here so we all dress pretty nicely and from my experience, most people are willing to share where they shop or how they style their outfits. Complements in general often spark conservation which could lead to a friendship.

Exchange Social Media Accounts and/or Phone Numbers

  • Follow your classmates on Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, or whatever social media site you use! This helps you connect with them during the week and is also helpful if you have a question about an assignment. Exchanging phone numbers is good too because you can keep in touch with your classmates even after the semester is over.

Hang Out During Break

  • At some point during class each week, we have a break that lasts about 20 minutes. During that time, my classmates and I walk down to the cafeteria, have a snack, and talk about anything and everything. Throughout these short conversations, we’ve gotten to know each other well. Without hanging out during our break, we wouldn’t know each other that well at all.

Be Open To Everyone

  • Don’t judge a book by its cover- meaning don’t judge someone by their outfit! It doesn’t matter what someone is wearing, it matters who they really are. Even though someone’s outfit may not be your style, they might be one of the best people you’ll meet at FIT. My classmates all have individual styles, but we all get along great. Being different from your friends is often what makes a friendship.

I wish I would’ve known all of these tips before starting FIT, it would’ve been a lot less intimidating. All the people I’ve encountered have something in common with me: we love fashion! This main common interest makes it easier than you would think to make friends.

Have a great week and a Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Thanks for reading,
Kenzie Davis

A few things FIT has taught me

NYCnewcropped“Never give up on what you want to do. The person with big dreams is more powerful than one with all the facts”- Albert Einstein.

Throughout the year and a half that I have been taking Precollege classes at FIT, I have learned many things, not only about fashion and putting together a great outfit, but also about life and myself. The first lesson I learned is that traffic lights and signs are more of a vague suggestion. Drivers will go where they feel like going, when they feel like going, and will not stop for you no matter how cute your outfit may be.

The second lesson I learned from my FIT Precollege experience is real responsibility. This class made me become far more prepared than I could have ever dreamed!! It has made me take on the responsibility of waking up early, getting to my locations on time, and having all the materials I need with me on hand. It has really helped me to grow up in the sense that in the big city you need to be your own best friend and rely on yourself to be organized and have everything you need taken care of ahead of time.

Overall, and I think most importantly, the biggest lesson I have learned is that a bottle of water in New York City costs two dollars, not four. And if anyone tries to sell it to you for four, you should swiftly walk away. Just kidding–although this is true.  The biggest and most important lesson I have learned from this experience is courage. I live in a small town that is quiet for the most part, and the idea of going to the city every weekend was the most exciting and most terrifying thing I could ever think of doing. So I did it. And from pushing myself I have learned that I am a lot stronger than I thought and can handle a lot more than I believed I could. At the end of my first semester class I was riding the train home with my FIT certificate in my hand and I will not ever forget the real sense of accomplishment I felt holding it. It wasn’t just a piece of paper, or even an award for completing that class; it was a symbol that I had grown as a person and pushed myself beyond any boundaries I ever thought I could push past.  I had overcome my fears, walked into the big city alone, and come out of the experience with new friends, skills and many life lessons.

These are just a few of the things that FIT and New York have taught me, and will teach anyone else who lets them!   I am thankful for this experience, and wish Happy Thanksgiving to all.