Changing for the Better

7.10.14 274

Chanel Handbag – 1955

Hey Mod Mavens,

My mom has been calling me nonstop since I arrived in New York City on Thursday, and every time she does it is to remind me of something or to warn me about a potential danger, and each time she does I remind her, “I am much more responsible when you are not here.” Of course she thinks I am just saying it to reduce the number of grays on her head, but it is true.

Being on my own has really made me rise to the occasion of growing up and facing reality. There weren’t many opportunities to do things for myself back in my small hometown in Florida, so NYC has given me the opportunity to experience all that The Sunshine State cannot.

Today was the first day of classes. I am usually quite introverted, but I quickly realized that would not fly if I stood any chance of not being alone during the lunch hour; I met so many interesting students and got a peek into their perspective of fashion, although at first it was intimidating to have to strike up a conversation on my own.

The classes were fascinating and got me super pumped for the next three weeks. Change is inevitable after all of the knowledge I am going to absorb. My day started with “Develop an Eye for Styling,” which basically affirmed my love for the career path I am hoping to pursue as a fashion stylist. After lunch (which I took at Pita Grill right across FIT – highly recommend), I ventured into “Fashion Forecasting.” The class began with a trip to visit a staff member of the FIT Museum who presented us with clothing from 1900-1990; my kind of history lesson! Being surrounded by fashion educators and lovers is a literal dream come true, and I know I will be learning from the students as much as the professors.

I think I can tell Mom that I will be alright here! What changes do you feel you’re going to go through…or have they already started?

Xoxo, Chari

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Sabrina

SabrinaGiacomaggioTaking courses:
HDE 112 Graphic Design for Parties, Events, and Fashion
HDE 118  Create and Build in 3D: Model Making for Portfolios

I’m Sabrina Giacomaggio, I’m 17 years young but growing up in New York has made me wise. I currently live on Long Island, a completely different world than Manhattan. Every opportunity I get I find myself escaping to the big city to find the hidden treasures this place has to offer. With a cup of coffee in my hand, and my headphones on my head, I begin my summer days on the LIRR to the most inspirational place I’ve seen yet, FIT.

FIT has been a motivation, inspiration and a thought of all things hope since as long as I would remember. At a young age I found myself gallivanting about fashion and the big school on 7th ave. With doubt of the practicality of the fashion and art world from many straight edged teachers and adults, I find myself with every opportunity moving in the right direction toward my dreams. As fall approaches, senior year comes closer and closer with the thoughts of applications and portfolios bashing into one and other through my head, causing a constant reminder of what’s next. My Precollege Classes this semester will be helping me, and inspiring me as I work on my final portfolio for the fall. With every bit of spare time, a lot caffeine, I’ll type my life away serving, all you readers.

FIT Precollege Programs are one of the most influential and life stirring decisions I’ve decided to partake in yet, as my last summer here, I plan to make it my best. I hope you all find the reins on your life and let this amazing place stir you in the right direction. Every opportunity is what you make it.

Until next time,

-Sabrina Giacomaggio

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Izzy

IsabellGeffner

Taking course:
HAD 150 Magazine Design 

AN INTRODUCTION, OF SORTS

So, yes, hello. My name is Isabell Geffner, Izzy for short, and I hail from Long Island. I am 16, and am currently going into my junior year of high school. This semester I will be losing my FIT virginity as I venture into the magazine design class in hopes of expanding my knowledge, meeting new people, and spending my summer doing the thing I love.

All my life I’ve had a thirst for knowledge, it could possibly be my most defining trait. Even if it’s the most seemingly irrelevant fact in the world, knowing for the sake of knowing is one of my greatest drives. I love being able to know everything I can, be it the fact that the word chivalry was derived from the French word for horse, cheval, or the fact that the first ever typeface was invented by Johannes Gutenberg, and was based off of the handwriting of the scribes, who had previously been the ones to create books. Knowing gives you a sense of understanding of the world around you, gives you new perspectives to look at, and information you could use in everyday life, even if you didn’t know you needed it.  I love knowing, and I believe that no matter how much you know, and no matter how long you’ve spent learning any topic, you could always know more. This need for knowledge is the driving factor in why I’m taking this class. I love design, I love talking about design (In fact, I never shut up. At this point most of my friends know the difference between a serif and sans serif typeface, and can properly identify between old style, transitional, and modern serif typefaces. I’m quite proud.), I love looking at intricate logos and thoughtful advertisements, and most importantly I love sitting down at my laptop and creating a poster or a website.

 My passion for design along with my passion for knowledge has brought me on a never ending quest, to learn all I can about design and use that knowledge to become the best designer I possibly can be. I’m so incredibly excited to be enrolled in this course, to be able to expand my horizons, grow as a designer (and hopefully a person) and continue on this quest. I hope you packed your armor, and brought along your cheval, because it’s going to be an exciting journey.

Until next time,

Izzy

The Working Man

Menswear, particularly men’s street wear, is something I find very interesting. I like looking at men and seeing the way they dress and what looks good on them. Construction workers in particular are a whole interesting group that deserve more attention than they get. They are gritty and dirty and real. Their clothes are a reflection of their work in the practicality of it. They seem to have their own definition of who they are. I don’t mean to talk about construction workers as a different species of human, it is a profession, and maybe to them it doesn’t define who they are. But in the same way you look at a group of business men and place a blanket statement over them, I look at construction workers and have something to say that I feel can apply to all of them.

Construction is everywhere in New York. The scaffolding in front of my school just came down a few months ago after being there for more than six years. Streets are being constantly torn up, facades of buildings being transformed, new ones being built. As much as the skyline seems to be constantly developing, one thing that never changes are the men who work on these projects. I’m talking about construction workers. We all know that Construction Workersfamous photograph of a group of young men hanging from the metal interior of a building hundreds of feet above the ground. The men in that picture fall somewhere between impossibly cool and utterly foolish.

Although the general uniform has changed over the years, the general feeling that construction workers carry throughout their respective eras has not. I see them every day on the subway, everyday on my way to school. They are rugged, like an urban lumberjack. During the winter you see them trapped in layers of sweatshirts and long underwear, and during the summer they strip down to t-shirts, showing their bare arms. Their hands are calloused and broken. Some carry strong and slim torsos, others hold a belly of beer. In a world and in a time when gender and sexuality and identity are all so subjective, I believe that when you look at a construction worker you are looking at a man. Back to the olden days of Cowboys and Indians and Clint Eastwood. I don’t mean to put a whole group of people in a box, I’m not saying that this the rule, or even the truth, this is just my truth.

Construction workers carry a sense of pride with them, you can see it in the way they hold themselves. They are confident. They know exactly what they are capable of, and have a sense of proficiency. Even if their job is cutting 2 by 4s or nailing two pieces of wood together, they know what they are doing. They look put together because they’re style comes out of necessity. They don’t necessarily care how they look, but they have to wear certain things just for the mechanics of their job. Tighter fitting clothes so as not to get in the way, but loose enough that they can work in them.

In fashion you can find inspiration literally everywhere. I find it in the diverse culture of the people around me. Maybe you can find it in the architecture of buildings or the delicate shape of flower petals. Whatever it is make it yours. Keep it close to you and don’t worry about what everyone else is doing.

Sophia

 

Before & After

Not only do we come to FIT to share our love of creativity, we also come to learn. After only two months of taking FIT Magazine Design classes, I see a noticeable difference in myself and my work. I’m more confident in my abilities to use design programs such as InDesign and PhotoShop. Not only are these abilities useful in the FIT classroom, but they also come in handy when creating other things such as banners, posters, and school presentations.

SO BASICALLY! I have pictures of my work from the first day of class, and also pictures of my finished work. It really amazes me to see the difference, and I would like to show you guys how effective this course has been. The top picture is my back cover advertisement (left) and front cover (right) from the first few weeks of classes. The bottom picture is my finished back cover advertisement (left) and finished front cover (right).

Before

Before

 

After

 

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