Sensational Sights & Surprises!

Hello everyone and Happy November!

Something I find great at FIT is the fact there’e always something happening. Whether it be a Portfolio Day, Admissions tours, or visiting the Style Shop; there really is always a way to get involved!

For instance on Saturday (Halloween!! Hope you all got loads of candy!), I arrived to the school and was surprised by this quirky mural! An FIT alum, Angel Garcia, was invited to kick off #chalkfit with his colorful and eyecatching street art!

"Innovation" -Mural done by FIT alum, Angel Garcia

“Innovation” – Mural done by FIT alum, Angel Garcia

Mural on the Pomerantz building

“Innovation” – Mural done by FIT alum, Angel Garcia

 

All week, FIT Illustration students will be able to share their art by creating beautiful murals of their own that will be plastered all over the Pomerantz building.

I don’t know about you, but I’m eagerly anticipating arriving at FIT on Saturday to see all the murals created/in the process of creation! I remember this time last year I saw all the murals online so being able to see them for myself is going to be so awesome!

Remember to keep your eyes peeled for these talented students creations and take pictures!

 

Another unexpected surprise this week was my Professor taking my class over to the exhibit, Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch, for inspiration when working on our magazines.

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibit presents almost 100 detailed and extravagant ensembles that are a must see for any student. It’s eye catching and mesmerizing, the amount of detail and thought process that must have gone into each and every garment is fascinating. If I could sit and analyze each piece all day trust me, I would!

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch @ The Museum at FIT

If you can, try to stop by while you’re at the school! The Museum at FIT is located directly across from the Pomerantz building and the exhibit is open until the 5th of December.

FIT is always bubbling with activities and who knows, maybe you’ll be surprised like I was along the way!

Thank you all for reading and have a great day!

-Emily Kelly

 

Living The Pre(college) Life

We’re growing up; some of us may not like it because we don’t know what to expect. For those of us thinking about college, reaching those teen years brings the question, “How am I going to handle college?”  Don’t just panic about the common app, try to prepare for the future with a hands-on approach.  A little over a year ago I wondered how I would manage in college; I’d probably forget to eat if it weren’t for my parents. Discovering FIT’s Precollege Program saved my sanity.  It provided exposure to my fields of interest and insight to the college experience.
train_stationMy first big step was getting to FIT.  I live in Jersey so I had to commute every Saturday.  This was a new responsibility to tackle, one that bettered me in the end. Commuting and navigating NYC was daunting but minor compared to another college fear, the social aspect; worrying that it’s not possible to make a meaningful friend group, again!  Thankfully, Precollege showed me otherwise. I took my first course over a year ago and three kids in my photography class are still my good friends. Yes, college is a new environment but it’s new to a whole group of people; studio 2people just as nervous with the same hopes and fears. The Precollege Program extended my understanding of the college culture.  I realized I’d no longer make friends in a town of random people with random interests. College is not limited to associations based on where you live.  Choosing a college provides the freedom of being with students, from around the country, with shared passions and understanding for each other.

Another pressing question is “what is the workload like in college?” Stories range from struggling just to get C’s to a 4 year party with a degree at the end. A valuable lesson learned from my Precollege courses is whatever the workload, it’s worth it because you’re doing what you love.  Some assignments are very demanding, but I realize I’m being graded on my passions so nothing will stop me.

The college experience is much more than new responsibilities, making new friends or tackling workloads. It’s about discovering who you are; through this the rest will happen.  FIT’s precollege experience is certainly making this transition a lot easier.

-Walter

The Complexity of a Line – Sarah Saul

“If you do what you love, then you won’t work a day in your life!” that’s what mom says. I always thought Interior Design would just be flower, textured rugs and fuzzy couches and pastel wall paper- all that I love. And as for the worst, well the worst would just be the fabrics that are hideous. The hideous fabrics that you have to pretend to adore more than the client does. That is NOT the worst. I repeat, NOT the worst. The worst is, believe it or not, drawing a line. And that, that is a lot of work.

This weekend, my professor taught us how to draw lines. “Why is he teaching a class of young adults how to draw lines?” oh i’m so glad you asked. See in Interior Design it’s extremely important to understand the makings of floor plans, blueprints, etc. Again, I thought all fun and games. Nope. In order to understand the makings you must understand how to draw a proper line. The designer (and/or architect) must rotate their preference of a pen or pencil creating a precise line that it adequate enough to base measurements on. I have seen surgeries preformed, I have watched detectives solve murders and I was there when Vampires came back from the dead. Yes, this was just on Netflix and yes, I did not live them. But, these events were complicated, yet I managed to understand and follow what was happening. Though, drawing a line was far too complex. Hell, most of  the young adults in my class were struggling!
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RELATABLE MOMENTS WITH YOUR BLOGGER:
1) Rub your thumb against your index finger as if you’re representing money.
2) Separate them by a centimeter and continue.
3) Now, move them across air in a straight line.
CHALLENGE:
Do this on tracing paper with a HB pencil. Avoid ripping tracing paper. Maintain a pretty little line using any ruler.
Admit it, be real with me, it’s hard!!! The professor is very supportive and helpful. He comes around the working space and helps each student individually so we can perfect the line. At first, using the T-square on it’s own didn’t do the trick, I still wasn’t a line person. Then, the architect scale came along. I truly believe the architect scale and I have a bond, it’s got my back and now I am a line person.
Throughout our past classes, the professor has been emphasizing how important it is to understand the architect scale. This architect scale is very difficult, until it isn’t, then it’s easier than pie. An architect scale is a ruler with multiple sides that have different measurements such as 1/8, 1/4 or 1/2. I’ll hush up on the lesson before I actually (god forbid) teach you something… I may lose you. Anyway, like a human beings need water to survive, Interior Designers need an architect scale to survive. This tool can literally save ones life…artistically. Combine your rotation of your preference of pen or pencil with the architect scale and you get a straight line that is used in your floor plan, blueprint, etc.
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 In the beginning of class, I was so dismissive of achieving proper form and exquisite lines, but now with the help of FIT and my professor, I truly believe that I am capable of anything that comes my way, especially any scary lines.
Thank you for reading!
Xo

 

Instructor Spotlight: Josef Zutelgte

1_Josef_Zutelgte_FIT copyProfessor Josef Zutelgte has been teaching in the Fine Arts Department at FIT since 2000, drawing, 3-D design and sculpture. He was born in Germany, attended the Westfaelische Wilhelms University and the Kunstakademie Muenster/Duesseldorf and received an MFA in 1983.  After moving to New York in 1986, he studied at The City College of New York and earned an MFA in Sculpture.  Zutelgte also collaborates with Phil Art Academy, preparing foreign students for U.S. undergraduate and graduate studies. Over the last several years, he has traveled to South Korea and China to coordinate intensive college preparation workshops. In the past, he has taught at Parsons and University of Pforzheim,Germany.

As a working artist, Josef Zutelgte has exhibited throughout the US and Europe, including the Corcoran Gallery, Washington DC, Jack Tilton Gallery  NYC, Roman Zenner Gallery, Germany, Konrad Moenter Gallery , Germany, Univerity of the Arts, Philadelphia, Hunter College, NYC , University of Hawaii.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

Awards include Triangle Foundation NYC (Residency), National Foundation of the Arts , Miami (Residency) , and  the Art Development Grant.

Website:
www.josefzutelgte.com

Prof. Josef Zutelgte Teaches:
HSX 021: Observational Drawing for Portfolios
HSX 022: Portraits for Portfolios 
HFA 148 55A Fine Arts Portfolio 

Teaching Philosophy:
In this age of globalization, digitalization, and climate change, the world (both natural and constructed) seems to change dramatically from one day to the next. It is my goal to help students hone their observational skills and encourage them to spend time looking at the world, question why things exist as they do, and propose alternatives in an ever-changing world.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

I view the classroom as a place for knowledge and inquiry, experimentation and discovery, failure and success. A successful art education allows and encourages the imagination to flourish. Through teaching, I have observed that as students develop their visual skills, they look more closely at their surroundings. As they find outlets for expression, they gain a deeper understanding of themselves—and this is the starting point for creatively engaging with our world. The creative process should be inviting, challenging, and fun. It is serious work, but we won’t find success if it doesn’t bring us pleasure.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

Advice for young students:
An important aspect of learning is to “play.” Art invites and encourages play and, in the process, you learn to take risks, solve problems, and find alternative solutions—all important things you can apply to other life situations.

On Precollege Programs:
It is absolutely awesome to work with many young motivated students and it is a great opportunity  for students to find others with similar interests and desires.

Artwork by Prof. Zutelgte

Artwork by Prof. Zutelgte

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Emily

emily salamon headshot
Precollege is Prefabulous!

As my mother crossed the Verrazano Bridge after missing our train from New Jersey to Penn Station where I would attend my first Precollege class last spring, I started to wonder if this was all a mistake. I had many of the same thoughts that we all have. Will people like me? Will my teacher like my work? Will I complete something I can be proud of?

And most importantly, were these two-inch heeled boots the wrong choice for today…?

Fortunately, as I walked into my class, the first of many, all of my questions were answered. I was home. From this first class in Fashion Forecasting, taught by the funny, fashionable and fabulous Prof. Gary Wolf, I not only learned the skill of predicting every fashion trend imaginable, but I also learned a few skills on life and being confident in my skin (and two-inch heels.). Taking this class allowed me to move outside my comfort zone and into the concrete jungle where I met friends who I can honestly say I will keep for a lifetime, and learned skills I will carry with me everywhere I go.

This fall I am enrolled in, “HAR 016: Creating The Fashion Figure” class, which will help me to improve my sketches and enhance my portfolio. My goal is to apply to FIT in 2017 to the Fashion Design program, and learn all the skills the school has to offer. I am thrilled to be back in a Precollege class with students who appreciate my creative side and personal style. There are so few people in my suburban high school who share my interests, so coming to Precollege truly feels like coming home. It is a place where people share the same passion for fashion and respect for style, but most importantly it has allowed me to step far outside my comfort zone. As Elle Woods once said, “You must always have faith in people, but most importantly you must always have faith in yourself.”

Who am I? Well I am still trying to figure that out. But most days I am a girl who models her look after classic yet simple pieces such as the leather jacket, as well as trending street style. I love to sing and will continue to stand in long lines to try out for The Voice (word to the wise, wear a coat in Chicago); love New York City and the buzz and hum of it; and spend most of my time with a great group of real friends (Squad!) I feel most like myself in the city and at FIT, where I can invent myself or wear something outrageous and everyone says, “Go girl!” instead of my high school where the principal sees my outfit and says “Go home, girl!” I love being with people who understand my creative side and appreciate my style, and I appreciate theirs. I love that I have the chance to blog for Precollege and report on the exciting things that are going on every day in FIT class rooms, and maybe even bring new outlooks and aspects to the already wonderful blog!

Precollege students: welcome to your new home away from home!

-Emily Salamon