Instructor Spotlight: Josef Zutelgte

1_Josef_Zutelgte_FIT copyProfessor Josef Zutelgte has been teaching in the Fine Arts Department at FIT since 2000, drawing, 3-D design and sculpture. He was born in Germany, attended the Westfaelische Wilhelms University and the Kunstakademie Muenster/Duesseldorf and received an MFA in 1983.  After moving to New York in 1986, he studied at The City College of New York and earned an MFA in Sculpture.  Zutelgte also collaborates with Phil Art Academy, preparing foreign students for U.S. undergraduate and graduate studies. Over the last several years, he has traveled to South Korea and China to coordinate intensive college preparation workshops. In the past, he has taught at Parsons and University of Pforzheim,Germany.

As a working artist, Josef Zutelgte has exhibited throughout the US and Europe, including the Corcoran Gallery, Washington DC, Jack Tilton Gallery  NYC, Roman Zenner Gallery, Germany, Konrad Moenter Gallery , Germany, Univerity of the Arts, Philadelphia, Hunter College, NYC , University of Hawaii.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

Awards include Triangle Foundation NYC (Residency), National Foundation of the Arts , Miami (Residency) , and  the Art Development Grant.

Website:
www.josefzutelgte.com

Prof. Josef Zutelgte Teaches:
HSX 021: Observational Drawing for Portfolios
HSX 022: Portraits for Portfolios 
HFA 148 55A Fine Arts Portfolio 

Teaching Philosophy:
In this age of globalization, digitalization, and climate change, the world (both natural and constructed) seems to change dramatically from one day to the next. It is my goal to help students hone their observational skills and encourage them to spend time looking at the world, question why things exist as they do, and propose alternatives in an ever-changing world.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

I view the classroom as a place for knowledge and inquiry, experimentation and discovery, failure and success. A successful art education allows and encourages the imagination to flourish. Through teaching, I have observed that as students develop their visual skills, they look more closely at their surroundings. As they find outlets for expression, they gain a deeper understanding of themselves—and this is the starting point for creatively engaging with our world. The creative process should be inviting, challenging, and fun. It is serious work, but we won’t find success if it doesn’t bring us pleasure.

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

Advice for young students:
An important aspect of learning is to “play.” Art invites and encourages play and, in the process, you learn to take risks, solve problems, and find alternative solutions—all important things you can apply to other life situations.

On Precollege Programs:
It is absolutely awesome to work with many young motivated students and it is a great opportunity  for students to find others with similar interests and desires.

Artwork by Prof. Zutelgte

Artwork by Prof. Zutelgte

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

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Sculpture by Prof. Josef Zutelgte

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