Instructor Spotlight: Abby Verbosky

Abby Verbosky’s roots are in social documentary and street photography. She has been a Teaching Artist since 2014 with International Center of Photography and Magic Box Productions with residencies in Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx.
Verbosky graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Photojournalism and Anthropology from Ohio University and enjoys storytelling through visuals.

Website: www.abbyverbosky.com

Abby Verbosky teaches:
JSX 006 Basic Digital Photography: Portraits 
JSX 007 Basic Digital Photography: Environments

Teaching Philosophy:
I have a passion for life and its moments—laughter, tears, intimacy, and despair, community and seclusion. I share this passion with my students through the power of photography.

On Precollege Programs:
I enjoy teaching driven students come into a college setting; it’s a new creative space to learn advanced skills and explore what their cameras can capture. With the tools they learn and their current environment, students will have an opportunity to go home with striking photographs. More importantly, teaching Precollege is a great pleasure as I get to help develop talent at a very early state. The skills my students learn will be helpful to them moving from middle school into high school and beyond.

 

First Studio Shoot Experience and Final Project Progress

Hi Precollegers!

Over this past weekend I had the opportunity of conducting two photoshoots for my class at FIT. One was in the studio here at school, and my second one was the next day, to show progress on my final project. This post will be divided into two my two shoots, and to describe my experience with both–obviously I will include some photos for you all, too.

On Saturday I participated in my first studio shoot, and while some parts were obviously hectic, it was a very rewarding experience. After setting up lights, reflectors, backdrops, and props, the half of my class that was shooting this class spent the rest of our time shooting each other. At one point we borrowed mannequins that were just chilling in the hallway and used them for comical photos that actually came out pretty well. It was overwhelming at times when having to quickly switch from a digital to film camera, and having to balance modeling one second, to helping someone reflect lighting correctly the next. The only major issue I had while shooting was how warm I became after a while due to my jacket and hat that I kept on because people wanted to use me as a model because of my interesting outfit. Hopefully the final pictures will prove that me overheating will have been worth it–I have a pretty good feeling that it was. Personally, the easiest things to shoot were the headshots, just because the only focus of the photo was the upper body and they could be the most simplistic photos, style wise. I had a great time taking headshots of one girl in my class because she has insanely beautiful curly red hair and porcelain skin, which highlights her bright blue eyes even more. I loved using the reflectors to correct the lighting of the shots; I never realized how much of a difference good lighting could make. Here are a few of my favorite shots from Saturday–both serious and joke photos:

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On Sunday I was determined to start my final project, which is a series of photos surrounding a theme of your choosing. I have decided to center mine around societal beauty standards—cliche, I know, but I will go more in depth about my concept and execution of my idea in my final blog post of the semester, dedicated to final projects. My close friend Anna agreed to be my model for this shoot, and she was the perfect choice. This shoot could be slightly controversial, due to minor nudity (don’t worry she is in nude underwear and bra), so I’m only going to post photos here that don’t show too much skin. The shoot didn’t take long to set up, being that it was mostly taken in my bathtub, but it took FOREVER to clean up. Glitter will go everywhere and anywhere and I owe Anna big time for doing everything that she did for me. Only the most genuine friends will agree to let you strip them down and smear glitter on their face and stick it on her tongue for aesthetic purposes. I wouldn’t be surprised if she still was finding glitter in her underwear a week later. I still have to shoot part 1 of this project with Anna (parts 2 and 3 are what I shot Sunday)–I’m sure she’ll be ecstatic to know that now I have to take pictures of her with a glittery face in PUBLIC!! Here are some of my favorite and audience appropriate photos from this shoot:

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Let me know your opinions on both shoots in the comments below–have any of you ever created controversial art?

See you next week!

-Francesca

FIT Photography Class Trends 2016

Hey Precollegers!
Unlike most of the courses offered at FIT, photography is one of the subjects that isn’t fashion oriented. Walking around campus on a Saturday or Sunday, you’ll see a majority of precollege students donning the newest trends and designer clothing and accessories. However, in the photography department, things run a little differently. Not to say that photographers don’t dress well and are clueless on style, but most of my classmates and I possess a style that is practical, yet artistic. I have noticed some reoccurring trends that are present in the classroom, and I’ve decided to dedicate this week’s blog to photography class trends. I like to think of a simple description of a photographer’s style this way: photographer’s can’t care as much about how they look compared to other people—they’re too busy making sure that everyone else looks good.

1. Dark colors
Especially when working in the darkroom, darker colors are important to wear to hide chemical stains. Wearing black when shooting in the studio is also helpful to not distract from the shoot, and it’s easier to tell who the photographers are when they’re in all dark colors. The only downside to dark clothing in the studio is that you’ll be a little warmer due to dark colors attracting heat from light. Other than that however, when in doubt, I just opt for black.

2. Stylish but comfortable footwear
I’ve noticed that a lot of people in my class wear Vans and Doc Martens—comfortable shoes that are easy to style and can really add character to an outfit. I’m a huge fan of both shoes, and they also add to the cool-artistic- alternative vibe that photographers tend to possess. Yes, we know we’re better than you. And we’re wearing dark colors and angsty footwear to prove that. (I really hope that you’ve noted my sarcasm here).
3. Fjällräven backpacks
As someone in my class once said “This is the backpack owned by every art student ever”. At my high school, maybe 3 other kids have this bag, but walking into class on the first day I found myself matching with 4 other girls! These backpacks are from Sweden and were originally designed for Swedish school children, hence their playful and childish vibe. They are a very bold and unique shape, and add a lot of personality to any casual outfit. They are also just the right size to carry a photography binder and camera, two obvious necessities for this class. To personalize their bags, some of my classmates sew on patches or attach pins to them, too.
4. Thrifted pieces
A majority of my class are second hand enthusiasts—myself included. Thrifted jeans, flannels, jackets and t-shirts are often found on the students in my class. Comfortable, practical, and probably cheaper, thrifted pieces are perfect to wear in an artistic class with a lot of moving and creating. Although our outfits are pretty simple for the most part, one of a kind pieces are sure to add character to a seemingly basic ensemble.

Layers of black textures with statement Docs

Layers of black textures with statement Docs

3 ladies rocking their Fjällrävens--original and mini sizes

3 ladies rocking their Fjällrävens–original and mini sizes

Thrifted mom jeans, various vans, and dark colors

Thrifted mom jeans, various vans, and dark colors

Thrifted layers with darker and muted tones

Thrifted layers with darker and muted tones

I hope this post gave you all some insight on typical precollege photographer styles!

See you next week!
-Francesca

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Walter

WalterSincoxGreetings fellow photographers and fashion enthusiasts, my name is Walter and I’m here to blog about the wide world of art. But first, you probably want to know a thing or two about the guy who will be writing these posts. I’m a high school senior from Westfield, NJ and over the past year I have invested a lot of my time taking Precollege courses at FIT, everything from Introduction to Traditional  & Digital Photography to Fashion Forecasting: Seeing into the Future to Sneakerology, but I still make time for other activities. During the week I participate in swimming, boxing, lacrosse and weight lifting. Along with these competitive sports, I pursue my recreational interests of piano, ukulele, soccer, and football as well as career related passions of photography, fashion, and sneaker collecting. I try to use all my activities to create a unified personal aesthetic that I have in my mind. An invaluable piece to that puzzle is a blogging opportunity at FIT (currently taking: HFM 064 The Ins & Outs of Fashion Merchandising and HLD 031 Sneakerology) .
At this point, I’ve only begun my push into many art and physical forms but I want to keep growing. I want to continue developing my work ethic while doing something that I love. An internship in the city, in particular at FIT, would be a dream come true. I have so many things I want to learn and do. When I get older, I want to look back with no regrets, knowing I did as much as I could. I want to experience all aspects of the modern art field; I want to design, direct music videos for underground rappers, use my photography to help charities, advertise clothing or models and work in the garment industry demographic.
While I know not all of this is possible in a single career, what a perfect time to explore and see where these passions can take me. Even if I don’t make a career out of all of these fields, I would still hold them as hobbies because it’s not all about money, it’s about doing what you love with the people and community where you feel welcome.

Now that you can paint a mental image of who I am and what I’m about, I hope you are excited about this blogging experience that we will tackle together.

Thank you for your time everyone, this is Walter, signing off.