Childhood Dreaming Becomes a Reality

My substitute professor taught us how to draw a basic blouse and skirt. I’ve always liked drawing but I never know how to fit it on a body and make it look real.

My experience with FIT so far is amazing. I love getting out of bed every Saturday and knowing I’m going to a class for my dream school. Prof. Cutting is a wonderful teacher and he helps everyone as much as he can.

I also entered a contest for pockets and purses. I designed a bathing suit and a backpack with little pockets in it, to keep wax for your surfboard or sunscreen sticks. It is so fascinating seeing your sketch on tracing paper and transferring it to marker paper, watching it come alive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This contest was introduced March 17th. Three students from the  who run the program took the class down to the museum to see how pockets and purses have evolved through the years.

Here are some photos:

~Bella Basile

Instructor Spotlight: Adam Straus

Adam Straus’ professional career might best be described as eclectic. He has worked as a sculptor, businessman, consultant, professor and inventor of candy and toys. In addition to inventing for the past 25 years, Adam has a Bachelors Degree of Fine Arts for metal-smithing, produced a line of award-winning, sterling silver baby spoons along with numerous other upscale gift items, worked in the special effects industry before there was CGI, and he currently teaches Packaging Design and the creative process at the Fashion Institute of Technology. He is currently developing his own inventions along with aspiring inventors to bring their ideas to market.

Since 1994 he has presented concepts to many industries with a focus on toys and candy, going to contract more than 20 times with 12 candy and 9 toy products reaching the marketplace. Two of the candy concepts received utility patents, and many of the items have been recognized with awards from the Oppenheim Toy Portfolio and Candy Buyer Magazine.

Prof. Straus teaches:
HPK 122 55A Graphic Design and Packaging Design   

Teaching Philosophy:
My class is an environment where exploration, discovery and taking risks is supported and encouraged. We speak about the design process and demystify it by breaking it down. By sharing skills and tools for creative thinking I lead students to independence and confidence in making choices as designers. They learn to resolve concepts in order to meet a challenge or need.

Industry Experience:
Invented and Licensed products to Church & Dwight, Hasbro, TF1, NSI International, Upper Deck, Irwin toys, Alex Toys, KoKo’s, Ludo, Toy Max, Candy Planet, & Jakks Pacific

Work by Prof. Straus:

FIT for the Talented

We are currently learning how to make outfits using a denim, stripe pattern and a floral. As the designer, you have to be very specific and show where the body is and where the folds of the garnmet are.

The last 20 minutes of class, we went to the gallery to see the student’s mood board’s and outfits they made. The students are very talented, they make their croquis look alive.

Have you ever wondered how to make your drawings look more realistic? Shading is KEY!

Here is a look at the talented work of people who were accepted into FIT:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Bella Basile

Instructor Spotlight: Brian Emery

Brian Emery is an artist and educator living in Brooklyn, NY. He has been teaching in the photography department at FIT since 2004, and teaches a wide array of digital skillsets and techniques. His art practice is centered around creatively misusing cameras to manipulate representations of time and space.

Website: www.placescapetheatre.com

Brian Emery Teaches:
HSX 114 Drone Photography

 

Teaching Philosophy:
The process of learning is one spent largely wandering around in darkness in hopes of finding brief moments of light. Those aha moments are rare, but gratifying. The key, however, is to learn to love the wandering.

Industry Experience/Recent Exhibitions:
Brian had a solo exhibition of prints and video work at the Romano Gallery in the Rose-Hipkins Center for the arts in Blairstown NJ in 2017, and participated in group shows at the Center for Photographic Arts in Denver Colorado, and the University Art Gallery at Central Michigan University.

In 2016 Brian was awarded a fellowship in 3D Visualization by the John D Rockefeller Jr. Library in Williamsburg, VA. And, in 2017 he received a National Parks Artist Residency at Gettysburg National Military Park.

Featured work by Brian Emery:


Expectations vs. Reality: Precollege

When enrolling in Precollege, I had a lot of misconceptions about the program and a lot of expectations that actually turned out to be very close to reality. Putting oneself in a situation that for many people is foreign, can be nerve-wracking. The following are some expectations I had of Precollege at FIT, and what the reality turned out to be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expectation: The environment would be intense, competitive, and stressful.

Reality: The environment at FIT is supportive and helpful. There is no denying that the courses are very educational, but it is not nearly as similar to a normal high school or middle school setting as it may appear. It is not to say that the environment of the class is not sufficient, but rather that the environment is perfectly appropriate. The community of students and professors involved in Precollege is lovely, and I am yet to meet anyone who expresses any aggression at all.

Expectation: The emphasis on paperwork would be heavy in order to calculate grades, and there would be tests.

Reality: I can’t speak for the other classes, but at least in my classes and in those of other students who I’ve spoken to, the amount of paperwork is minimal. The grading system is almost always based on rubrics and project work, including a final project. Again, I can’t speak for every class, but in the course I am taking, there are no tests and our final is an artistic portfolio assignment that is very open in concept and in grading.

Expectation: We would never leave the FIT campus.

Reality: My class has left the FIT campus several times to go on field trip style walks around the city in the area. It has always been safe, staying in a group and never being more than about a mile radius outside of the campus, but going outdoors has definitely had a positive impact on my experience. I was gifted with a lot of inspiration and the quality of my work and photos has improved.

Expectation: The class populations would be large, and the teaching would mostly be lecture-based.

Reality: The classes are not overpopulated at all. My class has around 15 students, and the course is super individualized. It’s a teaching style that I really benefit from, and I think most students would agree because it’s easy to stay focused. The class keeps the students extremely involved in the work with hands-on and visual methods. This is super helpful to me and to artistic right-side brain learners, who have trouble listening to something like a lecture and taking in the information.

Overall, Precollege has exceeded my expectations by far, and I am so grateful for it.

Chloe Abidi