In the Halls: Jordan

Photo by Mahalia

 

Student: Jordan from Nutley, NJ

Program: Saturday Live Spring 2018

Precollege Course: HAR 087 Advanced Design Art Techniques 2

Describe your personal style?

Edgy, Grungy.

Where do you go on your breaks from class?

Starbucks or Prett.

What is your favorite thing about FIT?

I love getting the experience and meeting new people.

Who or what inspires you?

NYC’s diversity.

What do you want to do after you graduate from College?
I hope to be working in the Fashion Industry.

Instructor Spotlight: Daniel Silverstain

Daniel Silverstain, a former musician and record artist from Israel, discovered his passion for design on a trip to India where he practiced in knitting, screen-printing, and jewelry making. Daniel began his design career in Israel 2007, serving as the Visual Merchandise Director for the Israeli branch of popular label KEDS. In 2009 Daniel moved to New York in order to complete his studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology. While still an undergraduate, Daniel was selected to collaborate with the Danish-based fashion label Muuse, a fashion group that partners with emerging young designers from around the world to produce their collections and sell them to the public. Early in his career, Daniel worked with the design teams of renowned fashion brands such as 3.1 Philip Lim, Calvin Klein Collection, and Elie Tahari.

Prof. Daniel Silverstain teaches:
HAR 016 Creating the Fashion Figure     
HSX 084 Designing a Fashion Mini-Collection
JSX 013 Fashion Art: Faces and Figures 

Teaching Philosophy:
Fashion should be fun and inspiring. I believe working and doing what you love makes you feel like you are not working at all – I would love my students to experience just that. I like encouraging my students to feel inspired and create what they truly love. My job is to give each student the tools and skills that will enable them to achieve their dreams.
Industry Experience:
  • New York Fashion Week / Paris Fashion Week / Creative Director at KEDS / Designer at Calvin Klein Collection / Designer at Phillip Lim / Genart Fresh Faces Winner / Vogue Italia and Muuse Most Promising Designer.
  • In 2013, Daniel was recognized by the CFDA “for his outstanding achievement in Womenswear Design”, and awarded a member of the CFDA+.
  • Daniel has dressed top international artists such as Solange, Halsey, Michelle Monoghan, and Lady Gaga, was selected by Refinery 29 as one of the “8 new designers to bet on in 2015”, and Chosen by Marie Claire as one of the “Best Emerging Designers for 2016”.
  • Most Recently, Daniel was selected to participate in the 20th Anniversary of GEN ART – Fresh Faces during New York Fashion Week, and was awarded by leading industry professionals as the winner of the Incubator Award with Gen Art.

 

 

In the Halls: Imani

Photo by Mahalia

Student: Imani from NYC

Program: Saturday Live Spring 2018

Precollege Course: HIL 012 Drawing for Illustration

Describe your personal style?

I would say my personal style is girly, edgy, and fun!

Where do you go on your breaks from class?

I usually go to the vending machines or sometimes continue to work in class.

What is your favorite thing about FIT?

I love the diversity and everyone’s unique style.

Who or what inspires you?

My mom definitely inspires me to do the best that I can do.

What do you want to do after you graduate from College?
I want to launch my own collection and open a store.

Instructor Spotlight: Michael Kaye

Professor Michael Kaye comes to teaching with 29 years experience in New York’s Garment Industry.  A graduate of FIT Professor Kaye has taught both lower and upper division classes as well as Precollege courses since 2016.  An award-winning designer, he has been featured in numerous fashion publications and his designs are in the
permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology as well as  Museums in Canada his native country.  Professor Kaye’s early years upon graduating were spent
working in various design positions from draper to assistant designer to designer of his
own bridge dress line.  For the past 18 years, he has had his own Couture company where he privately dresses some of the international set most fashionable women. He also has a line of Men’s accessories including shirts, ties, bowties, pocket squares, and cufflinks.

Prof. Kaye teaches:
HAP 026 Sewing for Fashion Designers (11 & 12 grades only)
HAP 017 Introduction to Draping for Fashion Design (Level 2)

Teaching Philosophy:
I try to make the students realize that Fashion is first and foremost a business.  There
are bottom lines and expectations that must be met.  I impart my students with the
knowledge they will need in order to be successful in this ever-changing industry.  I try to enlighten the students with practical knowledge and insightful stories from my vast
history in the garment center. And guide them to successful outcomes in the various
class projects we complete.

 

Most recent exhibitions:
FIT Staff exhibition -NEW VIEWS- March 2018 World Peace Tartan Gown…….
This Tartan was sanctioned by his Holiness The Dali Lama and I was commissioned to design a gown in the tartan. The plan is for this gown to be donated to Victoria and
Albert Museum in London England.

 

Get Out Of the “Dark” About Darkroom Photography

Traditional film and darkroom processes have been undeniably dying out over the past several decades with the invention of the digital camera. The new generation of photographers is following an interesting trend, though, with a sudden enthusiasm for the film medium. It’s a craze led by the likes of Gucci muse Petra Collins that can be compared to the record player: trend in music, people seem to believe that film is more “raw,” “real,” and creative.

Sheets of rolls of film.

Last class, when had my second experience with traditional black and white manual photography, I worked on developing film. If you aren’t familiar with this, there’s an entire process including working in the darkroom, that allows photos that are taken on a roll of film to be accessed. The whole process of development is multilayered and can be stressful for a beginner, especially in the darkrooms; a pitch-black environment that is essential for the photos to not be ruined because they are light-sensitive materials. After processing the roll of film, it is soaked in chemical baths and left to dry. This process allows you to access only 36 photos that one cannot see until the end, meaning that there is no way to tell if the shots will appear until you take out the photos and set them to dry. This is the risqué nature of the medium that some people reference as more artful than digital.

I interviewed photography instructor Cornelia Hediger to create an exposé on the ins and outs of traditional darkroom film, in comparison to digital photography.

Q: Do you prefer digital or film photography, and why?

A: Overall, I prefer the look and quality of a darkroom print vs a digital print. A traditional printed image, shot on film, has grain. I love the look of grain printed on fiber based paper. You cannot beat that look. It is absolutely stunning.

Q: What are some of the advantages of darkroom photography? What are some of the disadvantages?

A: The advantage of darkroom photography is that you have a negative to work from, versus a digital file. Each image is unique as the prints are done by a person and not a machine. A darkroom print still looks superior to me than a digital file printed in black and white. There are some very nice papers out there that mimic the look of a traditional fiber based print. Definitely, the paper and technology have come a long way and prints, produced with digital files, are starting to look better. The ‘disadvantage’ of a darkroom print is the time factor. It takes longer to produce a darkroom print versus a digital print.

Q: What is your favorite aspect of black and white film photography?

A: My favorite aspect of black and white film photography is that I absolutely love the process. I love to develop film and I love printing in the darkroom. I find it magical to watch an image come up in the developer and I like the slower process of producing an image. In the end, I also prefer the look of a black and white image printed on fiber based paper vs. a digitally produced image.

Q: For young photographers, do you recommend that they learn how to use both film and digital cameras? Do you consider film photography an essential for photographers?

A: I think it is a good idea for young photographers to learn shooting with film and at least experience the process in the darkroom. Film ‘forces’ you to slow down and perhaps be more responsible when taking an image. Each image is recorded on a negative and cannot be deleted like you would delete a digital image. Personally, I find the experience of learning how to take images with film/print in the darkroom essential when learning photography. To some people, it opens up a whole new world whereas others will find the process a slow and tedious one.

Q: Do you think darkroom photography will ever go “extinct”?

A: I do not know if darkroom photography will ever go extinct. In the fine arts, it seems to be making a comeback. The masses and everyday household will not turn around and go back to film. It seems that film and traditional darkroom printing is perhaps surviving through the arts. I have no idea, however, how photography will develop over the next decades.
-End of Interview

Chloe Abidi