Category: student work

Albrink and Arnold’s art of matchmaking

By , March 11, 2014 3:18 pm

No one knows what a couple might be thinking in a classical painting. But we sure know what their artful counterparts are thinking in Lynn Albrink and Laura Arnold’s modern replicas for their Match.com ad campaign. It’s something like “I really like this girl. How do I get her to the altar?” Or, “He’s hot. I’m so lucky I could pinch myself.”

Jan van Eyck "The Arnolfini Portrait"

Ad based on Jan van Eyck “The Arnolfini Portrait”

“It’s about finding your perfect match to show that dating and even the experience of finding ‘the one’ can be fun,” says graphic design student Lynn Albrink.

The project grew from a Fine Art’s-related assignment: go to a museum, find an artwork you like, and create an ad.

When Albrink and Arnold saw René Magritte’s surrealist painting of raining men, they had an idea. It could be reworked to represent a single woman watching men pour out of the sky. Such easy picking! And a perfect metaphor for an abundance of eligible men one might hope to find on match.com

Ad based on Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte’s “Raining Men”

Ad based on Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte’s “Golconda”

Albrink and Arnold continued with their match.com theme for the next assignment in Professor Frank Csoka’s Foundation in Advertising Design class. “We used the same idea to create an entire campaign for match.com,” says Advertising Design student Arnold.

behance-1s

Ad based on Jean Honoré Fragonard’s “Girl on the Swing”

They weren’t the only ones enjoying themselves. “It was an amazing and interesting experience working with Lynn and Laura on the ‘Girl on the Swing’ ad,” says Annie Yang who modeled for the ad. “It’s funny when I picture how I had to sit on a cooler while holding one chopstick in each hand. They even threaded a string through my black dress and pulled it back to give it the effect of movement.”

Professor Csoka oversaw the ad campaign with great enthusiasm.”There are so many works of art with couples, the thought was that this campaign could go on forever.”

Ad based on Jack Vettriano's "Singing Butler"

Ad based on Jack Vettriano’s “Singing Butler”

The complete project, with photos and details of how the project was completed, is in the 5th floor hallway between the D and E buildings.

Albrink and Arnold from  Rheine, Germany and Innsbruck, Austria respectively, met in class last semester. They are currently working on another project together and talking about starting a business after a few years of industry experience.

To see photos of the progression of the match.com campaign and other works they created together go to: lala design on Behance

 

To Russia with Love

By , February 11, 2014 8:01 pm

Most preoccupations FIT students have with snow and ice have to do with deciding how many layers to wear or blankets to pile on at night. But three Visual Presentation & Exhibition Design students found a way to send their support to the Olympic community. Here are three of their windows on Sochi with rainbow motifs.

Audrey Guadagnoli

Audrey Guadagnoli

A three-member Sochi window team formed in Prof. Peter-Tolin Baker’s freshmen exhibition design class. It included: Audrey Guadagnoli, Lilli Risler and Madelaine Auble.

“The assignment was to create three window designs central to a holiday pop theme,” says Prof. Baker. Each model is 15″ x 29″. “The challenge was blending a popular culture reference into a holiday winter-themed window,” he said.

“We had a hard time at first coming up with a pop culture reference,” says Audrey.

“We didn’t want to take it too literally. We also didn’t want to do anything too ‘holiday’ because everyone would be doing that,” says Lilli.

Sochi SMcopy

“Passing it on to you…Equality is in Your Hands”  Lilli Risler

One night Audrey saw a commercial for the Winter Olympics. “It’s celebrated around the world. It stood out. We talked about it in class and our teacher mentioned the gay rights controversy. It added another layer to our window theme,” says Audrey.

“It turned it into a pop culture theme,” says Lilli. “We chose MAC Cosmetics because we thought they were likely to be sympathetic toward the cause.”

“Social commentary is a big feature in effective window display,” says VPED Chair Craig Berger. “It draws you into a current story that expands into a broader commentary. The Winter Olympics is such a great current story.”

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Madelaine Auble

Prof. Berger says that this project is the first opportunity that students have in their courses to develop an individual display.

“Given the confines of the space, successful projects have to have a ‘wow’ factor,” says Berger. “Yet they also have to be executed with a great deal of craft to be seen up close. These windows achieve that.”

Audrey agrees that “Everything has to be perfect. You make mistakes every project and you get critiques and apply it to your next window.”

Says Lilli “You have to pay close attention to detail working at this size. It helped us learn to plan ahead.”

After a long day of classes, both Audrey and Lilli sneak in a recap of the Olympic games.

“Curling is my favorite,” says Audrey. “My parents love it!”

“I really like the snowboarding half pipe,” says Lilli.

The Sochi-themed windows from Prof. Peter-Tolin Baker exhibition design class are on the 4th floor of the Marvin Feldman Center, or C-building. They will remain up until early April.

photos: Peter-Tolin Baker

 

In Jessica Wynne’s photography class, illustration students “step back, loosen up and drop the pencils”

By , December 13, 2013 3:29 pm

Illustration major Enrique Page tells of a special experience studying photography this semester:

“Photography is one of the most interesting classes an illustrator can take. We can relax and take a step back, loosen up, drop the pencils, and just think of how we want the subject to look.

Photo by Enrique Page

(Although untitled, Page refers to his photograph above as “The First Self Portrait.” It was part of a class project on self-portraits.)

“Photography is all about telling a story through composition and through the details. During the semester, I focused on experimenting. Prof. Wynne showed inspiring artwork for each different assignment, which often had a strong impact in the corresponding homework assignments. She was always very kind to me, and willing to help me when I needed it. I’m very glad I was taught by someone with such a sharp eye.

“I learned a lot and I loved the class. It might have just been my favorite class this semester.  I hope we can still be in contact cause she’s the most awesome professor I’ve had.”

Holly Jo’s Staged Reality

By , December 10, 2013 4:47 pm

On a day leading up to the BFA photography exhibit, Holly Jo Schnaudigel was looking over her “Staged Reality” photo printed on crêpe georgette and backed with chiffon. The cinematic portrait shows a rapt t.v. viewer wearing negligee and curlers. She’s a gal whose glamour doesn’t fade. She’s not the least bit interested in the camera. But she looks like she’d be easy to get to know, and to like. Just like Holly Jo.  The piece is currently part of the “Departures” exhibit in the Feldman Center lobby on view until December 13.

Currently on exhibit “Staged Reality,” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

“I think ‘Staged Reality’ is a visual enigma. It isn’t until you get close that you see multiple layers of the fabric. You almost have to work through them. The imagery, the look, is simple to how she creates it.” - photography professor Curtis Willocks

We chatted with Holly Jo about “Staged Reality,” her “lingerie-inspired” piece, and about the techniques and experimentation she began in her teens:

“What I experimented with in Lakeland High School Westchester, NY), I was able to do on a bigger scale at FIT,” she says.

“Long Distance” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Holly Jo began a disciplined study of darkroom techniques before coming to FIT. “There are more tangible materials when you’re in the darkroom that I wanted to extend to the digital world,” she says.

“Holly’s choice of a soft fabric print blends seamlessly with the satin fabrics in the (“Staged Reality”) photograph. You almost can’t tell which you are looking at since the subject and the print have folds and reflections that are really the same. It was a great choice of a surface that enhances the experience of the image.” -photography professor Doug Mulaire

She now uses an “arsenal of arts and crafts techniques” to combine recognizable styles from different time periods.  “I take aesthetics from the 50s and 60s and add modern elements, like digital hand coloring and gluing glitter to photos and then scan them.”

“Stocking Stuffers” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

 “I was hands-on in the darkroom. Now I’m hands-on in choosing fabrics, which are also about touch and feel. Applying glitter, and digitally hand coloring are extensions of darkroom techniques I learned,” she says.

“Think Fast” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

“The way I dress and present myself is reflected in my photos,” says Holly Jo. Even her manner, she says, is a lot of 50s kitschy humor and old Hollywood aesthetics.

“She’s almost a period piece,” says Willocks. “She reminds me of the 40s and 50s especially when you talk to her.”

“Damsel in Undress” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Of another project “jump started” by images of pictures shown in a class taught by Professor Doug Mulaire.  “They were drawn on, and in others a filter was used with a shape in front of the lens. I tried ‘drawing’ with glitter! The ‘comic book’ photographs were inspired by my interest in Roy Lichtenstein prints,” said Holly Jo.
“Combining her 50′s glamour photos with Roy Lichtenstein’s graphic style is great direction that Holly came up with. It gives her work another component that is full of possibilities!” – Prof. Mulaire

“I like combining story-making elements in an old Hollywood glamour style. The comic book effect is something I am trying in order to achieve this combined look.”

“Simply Marvelous” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Double negative exposures, hand coloring, and sepia and cyan toning, were techniques that Holly Jo carried over from high school.

“I did projects that included hand coloring darkroom prints, which led to digitally hand coloring my pictures now,” she says.

“One of my finals was all in-darkroom double negatives, a method I used in Prof. Max Hilaire’s class. “My private study final project were darkroom prints painted over with glow-in-the-dark paint.” Holly Jo’s “light painting” method on pictures  led to her current glitter project.

“Boudoir” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

 Says Photography Department Chair Ron Amato, “Some students have a proclivity toward experimentation and investigation. It could be a part of a natural investigation, or personality or environment.” 

For Holly Jo, it’s all three.

 

The “Departures” exhibit in the Feldman Center lobby until December 13. To see more of Holly Jo Schnaudigel’s work go to Holly Jo Photo

Holiday Bizarre: VPED pop-up nets $15K for cancer funding

By , November 25, 2013 7:16 pm

In cooperation with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, third-year Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design students raised over $15,000 with their Holiday Bizarre pop-up shop that closed this weekend at FIT.

“This project shows how unique FIT is in the way we collaborate with industry, launching real world projects,” says Craig Berger, chair of VPED.

The Holiday Bizarre received full-page coverage the New York Daily News.

VPED students conceived & designed a pop-up shop to help raise cancer funds

The theme of the Holiday Bizarre was surrealism. But nothing was surreal about the big named fashions involved.

Brimming with chic designs from big names such as Prada, Burberry and Diane von Furstenberg, the project was 100% student-designed, from initial sketches to last-minute touches like music, shopping bags and holiday decor,” said Rheana Murray in the Daily News.

“It was beautifully done,” said Berger “It took an adventurous, non-traditionally holiday theme and skillfully executed with stunning graphics and beautiful fixtures. Congratulations to third semester VPED class!”

 

Photo: Rachel Ellner 

 

 

Blue plate special

By , November 9, 2013 10:48 pm

Did you want your Blue Plate Special with a line of hamsters? A hockey player skating with fishes or a baseball batter swinging at birds? Kitties are popular this year.  So are squirrels, bears, giraffes and chipmunks. There’s also a new play on “Waiter, there’s a fly in my soup,” or on my plate. All was served up by the Fine Art Collective in the Pomerantz lobby on Thursday. Don’t worry. There are still plates, bowls, cups and platters left.

The sale was one in a series of fundraising events to help cover costs to Art Basel, the international art show in Miami.

The MGM kitty roars

“A lot of people are doing pets or portraits,” said club member Carly Fitzsimons. We got asked for a goat. A goat O.K.”

“Did you hear about the Blue Plate Special?”

All plates are recycled from Good Will or donated. The images are painted, overglazed and then fired to make them permanent and food safe. They are also dishwasher and microwave safe.

“You can email us and ask for a plate we have in inventory, a custom design, an image transfer or a painting of the image. We love to do this,” said Fitzsimons, a third year fine arts major.

Alison Schmadtke, Brett Sutherland, Carly Fitzsimons

“Someone is going to have us doing plates of his portrait to give out for Christmas. I thought that was a good idea,” said Fitzsimons.

Tote bags were also incredibly popular. Perfect for carrying home your dish, bowl or creamer with pin-up girl.

Or for stockings.

Art Collective is open to any student. “Our mission is to see art and make connections in the art world,” says club advisor Prof. Julia Jacquette.

“We will see art and they’ll do mini internships,” says Prof. Jacquette about Art Basel. “Our members will help some of the art galleries with booths at Art Basel.”

Fine Arts Chair Stephanie DeManuelle imagining winning the sushi plate.

Even a plate of sushi was being raffled. (Edible sushi not included.)

Wait, there is a fly on my plate!

You may still purchase a piece of beautiful, usable art work, tote or raffle tickets by contacting: Carly_Fitzsimons@fitnyc.edu.

 

*The FIT Art Collective is a fine arts club that gives student artists from all majors opportunities to learn and experience art beyond the classroom, through student exhibitions, volunteering for arts organizations, lectures and visits to museums and  galleries.

 

Fine arts photographer crosses over, fashionably

By , November 7, 2013 11:37 am

Jordan Tiberio faces a type of conundrum not unfamiliar to students who fully explore their craft: “I won a fashion shooting contest, but I’m a fine arts photographer,” says the recent winner of the Western Digital (WD) Fashion Walk. “I’m used to taking things from memories and my past and recreating them in an artistic manner. I’m more into fine arts than fashion. But the contest sounded like a cool concept,” she said.

Winning photo: Jordan Tiberio

The Fashion Walk competition took place along the High Line and was overseen and judged by WD’s “creative master,” photographer Bruce Dorn. The setup consisted of four groups, with two photographers, a fashion designer and model in each.

“It was this big FIT collaboration,” said Tiberio. “FIT makes you try everything and pushes your comfort zone.  It gave me more confidence.  I like staging stuff and making things up. You don’t know if you like something until you try it.”

Within a 40 minute time frame and a four block radius, participants worked on their creative concepts. “I used a lot of special affects filters on my lens. I cover my lens with scarves or crystals to create ethereal images. I picked up the techniques on my own,” said Tiberio. “We found an area wrapped in mesh material. I had [the model] crawl underneath the mesh and then stand up behind it.”

Photo: Jordan Tiberio

“We like to create challenges that require students to think outside their discipline,” says Associate Dean Sass Brown, who with photography professor Curtis Willocks, helped organize the competition.

“People have different approaches. I threw Jordan in there to mix things up,” said Willocks. “She used filters that people haven’t used for 10 to 15 years. She took an old process and did something different with it. She created [the image] in camera–She didn’t have to use any post production. There it was in the camera. Bang!”

Photo: Jordan Tiberio

Tiberio grew up in Rochester, NY, an area steeped both in photography history and in fine arts.  “We went to the George Eastman (founder of Kodak) House every year in elementary school. We have the Memorial Art Gallery. My mom’s mother was an art teacher and my grandmother was a really good artist.”

“I tried to not make my work look like the High Line or the city. I used a lot of special affect filters on my lens. I just picked the techniques on  my own. So that’s what I brought. It was the one that won the contest. ”

A day with Bruce Dorn, the “relentless pursuer of beauty,” and Curtis Willocks the “teacher’s teacher,” Jordan’s the winner.

 

 

photos provided by Jordan Tiberio

 

Halloween lingers — not Christmas yet at FIT

By , November 1, 2013 3:24 pm

As New York stores start putting up their Christmas decorations, Halloween continues to linger at FIT…at least until the next downpour.

Andrea Granados

Lauren French

Ash Cashington

The campus gets chalked

By , October 28, 2013 5:06 pm

Illustration students went loud, bold and beautiful on the FIT campus today. Students from the senior illustration workshop recreated their classwork in chalk images on the concrete canvas of FIT itself. “The art is beautiful. I am so proud of this extension of the classroom,” says Joanne Arbuckle, Dean of the School of Art and Design, who was out viewing the work.

Carlos Bolanos illustration. Right-Corlette Douglas drawing

 A large-toothed bird morphing into a fish shares space with a dreamy-eyed boy beset with beaked creatures of his own.

Left-Grace Batista work. Right-Jenny Kim working

“There is tremendous interest from the public. You can’t get through 7th Avenue. It’s so crowded with people stopping and speaking to the artists,” said Dean Arbuckle.

Brian O’Neill working.  Brittany Falussy’s piece on the right

Prof. Dan Shefelman pondered how to amass images and video of the project that began flooding the internet. “The project is blowing up the blogosphere and I have no idea how to aggregate it all,” said Shefelman standing admid photographers and videographers filming student work.

l. to r. – works of Victoria Lane, Lachelle Lewis, James Deangelis ’13 (Illustration Dept grad & creator of original Chalk FIT logo), Hani Shihada, professional chalk artist.

Dispelled were notions that illustration belongs only in comic books and books for children.

Hannah Chusid and her creation

Hannah Chusid adds extra sizzle to her creation.

Photos by: Randi Butler

Like Mother Like Daughter

By , October 10, 2013 4:53 pm

Bonnie Papernik and her daughter Anissa Lorenzi have both studied 2D animation with Prof. John Goodwin. This May Papernik will graduate with her BFA in computer animation and her daughter will graduate high school.

“We’ll be graduating at the same time!” says Papernik. “Anissa’s  got college on her mind and I like this college. FIT has these wonderful programs.”

Prof. John Goodwin flanked by Anissa Lorenzi and her mother Bonnie Papernik

Papernik has worked in the past as a video producer at Panasonic, “a somewhat creative career,” she says. “On the side, I did art videos.” But her video making came to a halt after Anissa’s birth. “I did desktop publishing but it was volatile. In 2009, I got laid off because of the subprime debacle.” Papernik decided to return to school.  

“With all my experience I could run a corporation!” she says.

While working toward her AAS degree, Papernik took bridge courses to be eligible for the Computer Animation program. “My goal is to produce an animated cartoon of my own,” says Papernik. “My big goal is to have an original program and hopefully an independent production company like Sponge Bob.

Anissa took computer animation with Goodwin this past summer in FIT’s Summer Live program. “It was very exciting,” says Anissa. “I got to be in a real cool environment. I got to meet kids my own age and look around at different programs at FIT,” says Anissa.

Mother and daughter compare notes about the animation class: They both made landscapes with gradient tools. “We animated a sunset!” said Anissa, “and then animated text.” They began with learning the basic movement tools—position, rotation, scale and transparency.

“Anissa comes from an arts background. She’s into advertising and marketing. Here in New York, it’s very applicable to the market,” says Papernik.

Goodwin recalls the first time Papernik animated her signature character Florentine. “She animated her walking the red carpet at a Broadway show. She had Florentine driven around in a limo. It was definitely a star treatment!”

Papernik is now experimenting with her character Florentine in 3D.

“I have to figure out her voice and who she’s going to interact with,” says Papernik.

“2D or not 2D” jokes Goodwin.

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