Nicole Conti’s hands add environmental messages to fabric

Turbulent events in the public arena were the catalyst for Nicole Conti’s final thesis concept. “I started with a political concept related to the anger that followed the election,” said the 7th semester fashion design major. “Things people were doing to make themselves heard — were they protesting to express anger or to make a change? I started with this personal idea that I could explore.”

Nicole Conti in the development stage of her senior thesis project

Over the summer, Conti took a close look at climate issues strongly related to Standing Rock and the G20 protests in Europe. She came well prepared to the table, with a solid academic background on environmental issues. She began her undergraduate studies in environmental science at SUNY Potsdam. At Putnam Valley High School she took environmental science classes and started a Go-Green club.

“I thought of the anger directed at the fashion industry, and of how people are often not willing to implement changes in their own lives to affect change.” Her concept would be to juxtapose the expression of angry and the fashion industry.

Nicole with book of hand expressions, and her armband

“I began noticing peoples’ hands, how they show love, anger, brutality. I collected images of hands in various states, old, young, worn.

“I started seeing the aggression, the fight, the split knuckles and then ended up at the environmental point of oil spills, of people dipping their hands into the water to show how polluted the water was.”

Nicole Conti’s images and fabric samples

Then Conti looked at animals saturated from the spills and began experimenting with different textiles to represent the oil coatings.

“I began experimenting with pulling fabric through other fabric (below) to show a spilling effect. I wanted to work with vegan leather, fake fur, organic cellulous fiber. The spikes are a representation of anger.”

Says her professor, the fashion designer Charles Youssef, “Nicole has found a great way to take (the concept of) oil spills and translate that into beautiful textiles that can be worn as garments.”

Nicole Conti with sample of pulled fabric

Conti’s Sportswear Incubator class proved ideal for her exploration. It is described as a research and development course where students “stretch the possibilities of shaping, seaming, handling, and manipulating select fabrics to create innovative, wearable designer sportswear silhouettes and details.”

Professor Charles Youssef, has held senior design positions at Calvin Klein, Gareth Pugh, Cerruti, and Ralph Lauren.

7th semester Sportwear Incubator class FD462 601 with Prof. Youssef

“This is a hands-on class where you manipulate the fabric draping patterning, even the textile development,” says Conti. “We came prepared the first day to state what our projects were about. I was able to get started right away.”

7th semester Sportwear Incubator class FD462 601 with Prof. Youssef

For her next step: “I’m going to keep my hands coated in fabric paint as I develop garments so that fabric becomes saturated with paint everywhere I touch it to represent your carbon footprint – what you leave behind without even thinking.”

Fashion Design Prof. Youssef reviewing Nicole Conti’s thesis concept

“I can tell it’s going to work,” says Professor Youssef.  “The challenge is to get it to where we visualize it to be.”

Photos by Rachel Ellner

 

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Supremely Supima: Alyssa Wardrop!

Recent graduate Alyssa Wardrop has won the 10th annual Supima Design Competition. Her womenswear capstone collection was seen on the runway during Fashion Week yesterday. Art and Design Dean Troy Richards and Fashion Design Chair Eileen Karp were there and captured the moment.

“I really got to do what I love doing and put everything into it,” said Wardrop upon receiving her award.  Wardrop said earlier that her collection was inspired “by the way screens in a movie are cropped, capturing beautiful moments.”

One of the designs from Alyssa Wardrop’s winning capsule collection. Photo courtesy of Supima

“I was impressed with the way her designs were specific to the material,” says Dean Richards. “As an artist it’s important that the idea and the medium work together. She accomplished that beautifully.”

Supima, the trade association of American pima cotton growers, awards a $10,000 cash prize to the winner of the competition.

Currently a design intern at Calvin Klein, Wardrop graduated last year as a top fashion design major with a minor in art history. Along the way she studied a year in Milan and was a member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society.

“We are so proud of Alyssa,” said Karp. “Her garments are edgy and fresh and show new ways to work with Supima cotton. She really discovered her voice and aesthetic in the last year and a half. I was thrilled to be in the audience cheering her on.”

Design of Supima winner Alyssa Wardrop. Photo: Dean Troy Richards

Wardrop, who completed her BFA last year, was mentored in the development of her collection by fashion designer and FIT professor and alumuns Daniel Silverstain.

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New season of Faces & Places lecture series focuses on impact of gender identity on fashion

Each semester speakers from the fashion industry, and beyond, discuss creativity and entrepreneurship in the Faces & Places in Fashion lecture series.  This year the emphasis is on gender and how it relates to design creativity from both cultural and functional perspectives.

This season’s lecture series has a focus on gender and fashion

Faces & Places in Fashion is a credit course offered through the School of Art and Design. The guest lectures are open to the public.

“It’s an opportunity to hear from thought leaders about how current issues–in this case gender–intersect with fashion,” says Professor Joshua Williams, who leads the series.

Professor Joshua Williams, host of Faces & Places in Fashion lecture series

“For instance, Zara, the clothing and accessories retailer, has launched an ‘ungendered’ clothing line in hopes of attracting millennial consumers. There’s a perception that it’s PR-driven. It’s something to discuss. As with sustainable fashion, we’re becoming more perceptive to when it’s PR-driven (‘green washing’), versus when it comes from a real concern for the environment and human rights.”

Dapper Dan of Harlem on the cover of Don Diva magazine

Professor Williams looks to “delve deeper into the PR and nuts and bolts of creating clothes that are “gender queer.”

“How does creating a men’s suit change when you’re creating it for a woman? How do you communicate to this market in a way that isn’t sensationalized, but authentic?” he asks.

An open invitation to Faces & Places in Fashion Fall 2017

“We are so excited to have some key pioneers of gender-diverse fashion design coming to talk,” he says. These trailblazers include Daniel Friedman of Bindle & Keep (October 2); Kelly Moffat of Kirrin Finch (October 30); and Joshua Katcher of Brave Gentlemen (November 13).

Faces & Places will also be hosting the esteemed Harlem couturier Daniel Day (November 30).  Day, also known as  Dapper Dan of Harlem, was the go-to designer of 80s hip hop. Some of his fascinating background was captured in a recent front page New York Times Style section article subtitled: “Twenty-five years after luxury labels sued his Harlem boutique out of existence, Gucci looks to him for inspiration.”

For a complete schedule of speaker dates go to: Faces & Places in Fashion. For more information about this credit-course go to: CL-112.

 

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Footwear for the Footlights

Ornate, flamboyant footwear has been flaunted in royal courts, the runway, the stage, even in coffins, throughout eras noted for fashion innovation.  Yet for all the outward extravagance, there are secrets to their construction.  The Theatrical and Character Footwear class for fifth semester Accessories Design students “introduces students to another aspect of the footwear industry,” says Professor Vasilios Christofilakos who teaches the Monday morning class.

Theatrical and Character Shoe Designs

“The young Egyptian King Tut–What might he have worn in his short life as king, and what would he have been buried in?” There was use of exotic animals and jewels; they designed gilded Egyptian toe covers.

“The brother of Louis the XIV, the Duke of Orleans–What might he would have worn to show off the ‘transgenderism’ of the time? He was also a phenomenal warrior.”

Of course Marie Antoinette is part of the curriculum–not only what she wore to court, but perhaps to the guillotine.

There’s a Spanish period famous for black and gold, harkening back to Byzantium.  Prof. Christofilakos makes reference to the Byzantine slippers of the emperors and their wives, like Theodora, the clergy and high priests.

Along with lectures and demos, students create concept and inspiration boards and five footwear designs throughout the semester.

“The shoes have to be telegenic,” says Prof. Christofilakos. “They should look good on stage, for the camera, and be successfully translated for the big screen, television, and electronic devices.”

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Crown Heights Artist Hendel Futerfas

At the 2016 graduating exhibit last year there was an unusually large turnout for Fine Arts student Hendel Futerfas. Gaiety and critiquing ensued among dozens of hip-looking exhibit-goers who spanned four generations. They endlessly arranged themselves to be photographed in front of Hendel’s installation while his 102-year-old great-grandfather looked on proudly.

Hendel Futerfas (center) with friends at 2016 graduating exhibit

“Hendel is a bridge between the art world and our community” said attendee Chavi Kaufman, 24, a pre-med student from the Lubavitch Hasidim Crown Heights community.

“These orthodox parents have to be pretty cool to send their kid to art school,” said Hendel’s sculpture professor Sue Willis, after meeting family members.

Untitled (40”x4”x60”) by Hendel Futerfas

According to members of this tight-knit ultra-orthodox community, there is greater reverence for the arts than ever before. The impetus, they say, came from a dialog between Hendel’s great, great uncle, the artist Hendel Lieberman, and the influential leader, Rabbi Menaḥem Schneersohn, known as “the Rebbe.”

Three generations later, young artists benefit from this legacy.

“Wedding Ceremony,” (oil on canvas) by Hendel Futerfas

“The Rebbe was well-educated and thought art was extremely important, that a true piece of art could change a person’s whole attitude,” says Zev Markowitz,  director of the Chassidic Art Institute in Crown Heights.

Markowitz, who wrote a biography of Hendel Lieberman, says that passersby used to cross the street to avoid paintings in the Institute’s window.  The nervousness was due to the Talmudic pronouncement that one should not worship graven images.

Markowitz himself contacted the Rebbe during this period. “As a result, he said “things changed overnight.”

Today there are about 25 arts events a year in Crown Heights, including pop-up exhibits and gallery events.

“The Philosopher,” (47”x 11”x 47”) by Hendel Futerfas

“Sculptors strive to be magicians. To make the viewer believe and suspend belief simultaneously. Hendel’s wooden objects do just that. He takes us on a journey taking us back to consider the history of his making, the history of cutting, bending and cajoling the hard wooden forms into sensual organic curves that defy the original life of the material. The final forms project both strength and fragility. One can’t escape the metaphors of inflicted pain, rebirth, evolution to beauty and transformation inherent in these works.” –  Joseph Seipel, Interim Dean, School of Art and Design

“Might” (7’x11”x37”), by Hendel Futerfas

Since graduating, Hendel has completed a six-week artist residency in Korea, has exhibited work in a group show at The Rosemont in East Williamsburg, and for the past four consecutive years, had his work shown at The Beach Minyan in West Hampton Beach.

“I’m currently working on a series on the concepts of growth and transformation that reflect my understanding of my community” says Hendel. “I use wood, which has the characteristics of being strong and stubborn, yet has an organic flow.”

Hendel then cuts and patterns wooden beams in a way that allows him to bend the wood in shapes and directions he chooses. “I combine and then carve different beams. There are contradictions in the process, which represent an internal process of transformation.”

“Aleph,” (acrylic on canvas) by Hendel Futerfas

While the back story of his uncle precedes the young Futerfas, he acknowledges its impact. His connection to Hendel Lieberman, for whom he is named, carries great weight.  Lieberman served in the Russian army during World War II. His wife and two children died in the Holocaust. Lieberman then, to avoid Stalin’s repression of Jews, changed his last name from Futerfas, escaped and eventually settled in Crown Heights where he befriended the Rebbe.

Lieberman’s correspondence with the Rebbe (excerpted in his biography) shows the leader’s reverence for the artist’s mission. “An artist reveals…the essence and ‘being’ of his subject,” says the Rebbe. The viewer “realizes that his previous impressions of the object were erroneous. In this way [the artist] serves the Creator.”

Today there are greater opportunities and artistic activity in the Crown Heights Hasidic community. The price of Hendel Lieberman’s paintings have risen greatly.

Fine Artist and Sculptor Hendel Futerfas

Young Crown Heights Hasidic artists speak knowledgeably about the Rebbe’s statements to Lieberman and other emerging artists. “Artists have all heard stories like this,” says Elad Nehorai, a blogger and arts organizer. “They’re encouraged that there’s a powerful voice that’s supporting them.”

To see more of Hendel’s work visit his website: HendelFuterfas.com and on Instagram at: h_e_n_d_e_l

Images used with permission.

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Fine Artist Jennifer Lopez “courageously looks deep,” finds and portrays contrasts

“In these two paintings, I explore the concept of duality, the contrast between two concepts or two aspects of something,” says recent Fine Arts grad Jennifer Lopez.  The “something” in this dual canvas work created for her final thesis, is herself.

“Bruja” by Jennifer Lopez (left side of “Dualidad” diptych)

“I chose to showcase myself as how I believe others perceive me. The canvases, (which make up the diptych “Dualidad,”) are adorned with symbols that represent me,” she says. “I drew my inspiration from Frida Khalo with her flat busts of detailed facial features and nature and animals.”

School of Art and Design Dean Joseph Seipel, whose background is in fine arts and sculpture, noted without suggestion, the comparison of Lopez’s work to that of Frida Khalo’s.

“‘I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best'” Dean Seipel quotes from Frida Khalo as it relates to Lopez’s work.   

“Witchchrist” by Jennifer Lopez (right side of “Dualidad” diptych)

Contrasted in her work, says Lopez “is a portrait of myself as a demonic entity, as Witchchrist, which I embody as a my artistic self.” There are hints of influences of other artists as well in Lopez’s work, such as Michael Hussar, David E. Rankore, and Blake Neubert.

“How courageous it is to look deep and find that inner-self that at times can be contradictory–sometimes scary and other times comforting” says Art and Design Dean Joseph Seipel.  “Confronting and expressing that contradiction is difficult but empowering. Lopez’s paintings live in that world.”

As she prepared her thesis project, Lopez paid a visit to Anthony Santuoso‘s home and studio. “His conceptual art shows him as a character in his own rather surreal depictions of life. This was a huge inspiration,” she says.

Lopez found “there are multiple ways I can show who I am and where my style takes me. I have the ability to show people quite literally what I’m about or be a tad creepy and cryptic.”

Artist and Fine Arts grad Jennifer Lopez at the School of Art & Design Graduating Student Exhibition

Lopez’s work, says Fine Arts Professor Jean Fienberg, shows the range of students’ artistic expression. Their senior thesis project, “is an opportunity for each student to seek to express a very personal approach.”

To follow Ms. Lopez’s work on Instagram go to: @witchxchrist. Or visit her website: www.witchchrist.carbonmade.com

Images used with permission.

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Illustration students interpret a “culture of calamity”

Whether the result of a New York Times assignment or a class assignment, “legions of professional and amateur artists are trying their hand at political art right now,” says Illustration Prof. Anthony Freda. The impetus: the turbulent presidency of Donald Trump.

Recently, Freda gave his Visual Communication students the same assignment he was given by the New York Times (NYT). It was to illustrate the story “The Perverse Thrill of Chaotic Times,” for the Fashion & Style section.

“Trump Marilyn” by Gina Ienopoli

“The goal was to use Trump as a symbol of the age,” says Freda who doesn’t discuss politics with his students. “That’s not my job,” he says. Instead he shows examples of work with historic context of political art.  Their tools:  irony, parody, homage or satire.

For “Trump Marilyn,” Gina Ienopoli drew on a parody of the Hope Obama poster showing Trump with fly-away hair.  “It sparked the idea of using a recognizable image. I didn’t want it to be political. He’s a celebrity. So Marilyn popped into my head.”

Says Illustration Chair Ed Soyka “The visual communicator often applies an established historic icon, as Gina has done, and alters it to make a new statement and meaning.”

“Magritte Orange,” by Samantha Ferrer

Freda showed students the work of editorial cartoonist, Thomas Nast, whose critiques of the New York politician Boss Tweed helped expose corruption in New York.

“I want students to see illustration as one way we look back to understand a time and place. We can’t simply be anti everything!” says Freda.

“The Near Dystopian Future,” by Ariane Zhang

Ienopoli says that Freda’s NYT’s illustration was “absolutely a good reference point. He had taken an iconic image and replaced it with a modern topic. He showed that you don’t need Trump’s face in order to be on the topic of Trump.  That’s why I added the wig flying off bit, to relate to a memorable past event.”

Ariane Zhang says that “with the havoc Trump has brought, her work [above] is the future that I visualize.”  Zhang used watercolor and gouache for a dreary and faded effect, and outlined the two survivors in white gel pen. She agrees that Freda’s NYT’s piece was “a good starting ground for the assignment with the idea of fear and terror.”

“Cheeto Trump,” by Catherine Choon

“I knew some students were sharing the emotions of fear and loathing that have permeated the zeitgeist,” says Freda. “My hope was that in creating a compelling illustration, the process would help to purge negative emotions.”

Catherine Choon was stumped until she remembered the first time she saw Trump on television. “I was irked at his skin color. Why is he orange? Who is he? I related that to Cheetos.  I think it’s funny.” Choon says she’s not very political but “concerned about the President’s decisions.”

Ienopoli  says she hopes that viewers of her work will see Trump as a businessman and celebrity. “His background will effect the way he does his job as president.”

By Prof. Anthony Freda & Dan Zollinger for the New York Times 

In the NYT’s article that features Freda’s illustration (above), novelist Teddy Wayne says “Trumpian turmoil” makes people “feel as though they are part of something bigger than themselves.”

For Freda, that part of “something bigger” comes from interpreting momentous events. “I knew these talented students would come up with some powerful imagery, and they did.”

Images used with permission.

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Erica Ventura goes upscale in design competition

Not many clients these days “live above the store,” so to speak.  It takes a sharply inquisitive imagination and some fancy skills to know how to deck out a full-floor apartment at the Met Life Tower, complete with a spacious wrap-around porch overlooking Madison Square Park.

Erica Ventura

For the redesign of the massive floor-through apartment Erica Ventura drew up some winning plans! The fifth-semester Interior Design student received the very first Centennial Design award from the prestigious Decorators Club.

The space was to accommodate the tastes of a senior arts curator of the Madison Park Conservatory, her documentary film producer husband, and two children. It would also have to impress a large posse of art world professionals.

Erica Ventura

“It was perfect for me!” says Ventura who is also a painter and muralist. “I can relate to building a space for someone passionate about art like I am. As soon as I looked at the art work available for the project, I was excited. Art was an option for each of the dramatic spaces.”

Some of the specifics that the judges noted were her exterior space, window treatments, textures, wall treatments and covering.

Living room designed by Erica Ventura

The formal living room was designed around the sculpture that was applied to the ceiling. It’s made of paper plates cut and slotted together. The piece by Tara Donovan, mimics the ways of nature, cellular growth, and molecular density. 

Winning the Centennial Design award in its inaugural year was a tremendous high. “I was so excited. Everyone had such a different approach and all are really creative and beautiful,” said Ventura of the finalists.

“It is a huge honor for us to award our first Centennial Design Competition prize to a student as talented as Erica.  Her design showed an excellent understanding and use of scale, skillfully incorporated the required furnishings and artwork, and most importantly, she carefully considered not just how the spaces would feel and look, but exactly how they would be used.” – Courtney Coleman, Co-chair, Decorators Club Scholarship Committee

Erica Ventura’s floor plan for the 31st floor of the Met Life building

Ventura, who says she “loves looking at floor plans,” gives some advise to the novice:

“To best read look first at the point of entry. In my case it’s the elevator bank [above] that leads to the foyer where a circular wall guides you to a living space.

Library designed by Erica Ventura

Symmetrical pocket doors lead to a library that functions as a home office for conducting business meetings. Included is a built-in taupe lacquered bookcase where the husband’s 23 vintage atomic models and a vast book collection are showcased. The ceiling has a brass textured wallcovering that merges with the brass from Ron Arad’s Thumbprint sculpture. 

“Her love came through for the client and the project. Erica understands the project and the art and interpreted it very, very well. It’s calm and sophisticated. Her strengths were her attention to detail, choice of furnishings and design of the wrap-around, outdoor space.  – Carmita Sanchez Fong, Chair, Interior Design

Dining room designed by Erica Ventura

The dining room has a custom glass-top table that seats 10 and can expand to 20 for events. The contemporary “octopus” chandelier by Achille Salvagni and blue wave console are accented with silver metallic window treatments and geometric color study paintings by artist Josef Albers.

“I wanted a series of lighting coves to give a wash of light down the walls,” she says.”The way I use the art is to highlight the space and build the floor plan around the art pieces.”

Bedroom designed by Erica Ventura

The bedroom walls are upholstered in a Scalamadre tweed gray fabric with a pair of industrial black sconces to flank the king-sized bed. Above the bed in a recessed space is “Charmed,” Atticus Adams’ aluminum relief sculpture. A pair of black Knoll Platner lounge chairs offer a space to spend a moment gazing upon the cityscape through French doors.”

“Every design is inspired by different things,” says Ventura who transitioned into the Interior Design BFA program after taking courses in 3D construction model making, foundation art that focused on design, and plaster perspective drawing.

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No limits to graduating fashion designers’ imagination

Congratulates to Our Fashion Design Seniors!

Setting up for judging day

From butterflies, evergreens in the frigid tundra to high school uniforms and 18th century chantilly lace, senior design students reveal the under layers of their inspiration.

Meredith Gill’s design inspired butterfly wings. “I’ll be working on more butterfly designs for a collection!”
Katelyn Zawierucha flanked by her designs “Inspired by frigid tundra, the snow covering evergreen trees. I love winter!” #FITfashionshow
Angelica Ryan with duel childrenswear designs inspired by school uniforms “I actually took apart my old uniforms from Pope John Lions” high school!
Nicole Wilson with intimate apparel design “it’s fantasy and feminine.
Amy Campbell knitwear student from Dublin with her Irish wool coat chosen for the catwalk “Can’t wait to see it on the #FITFashionShow runway!
Annelise Davis w/winning intimate apparel design. Inspiration comes from an 18th century chantilly lace design on display at the Sigal Museum in Pennsylvania.
Wilson Santacruz “bringing a new look to sportswear,” with a shout out to Planned Parenthood.
#CrueltyFree #BlackKnit #Bondage #HaremKiltPants Christina de Gagliardi’s senior fashion #FITfashionshow
Amanda Spira with her senior design inspired by grandpa who wore blue medical glove. “That’s why the rough masculine feel with ‘pops’ of blue.”
FIT:  Where childrenswear dreams come true!
Jordan Mayer’s senior design inspired by “breaking up of different horizon lines of earth, water and sky” of Malta

RUNWAY ALERT!: Selected work from graduating fashion design students will be presented at the Future of Fashion 2017 runway show. Specializations include sportswear, special occasion, knitwear, intimate apparel, and children’s wear. The runway show will be streamed live on FIT’s website here: #FITFashionShow

Snapshots by Rachel Ellner

 

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Ode to Jianrong Lin’s “Momentum” series

“I think human bodies look best when in motion,” says Illustrator Jianrong Lin, (’16), of “Momentum,” his series of athletes in the heat of competition. Lin’s exquisite work evokes images depicted on ancient Greek urns. “What men or gods are these?” one might be inspired to ask, as the poet John Keats did of the “mad pursuit” of gods and maidens.

“I used different body forms to convey power, speed, and flexibility.  I made this composition [above] in an arc form to emphasize the speed and momentum of the athletes.  Perhaps this is the moment right after the runners take off,” says Lin.

Since graduating Lin has created posters and medical illustrations for the pharmaceutical company Merck, a storyboard for an AT&T campaign and a restaurant mural.  And more good news: one of his illustrations was accepted into this year’s Society of Illustrator’s Annual Student Show.

“The foundation of Jianrong’s fantastic work starts with his observation of things as they are, then translated into unique images. He has a sense of color that’s his own that comes from hard work and a love for what he does.” – Ed Soyka, Chair, Illustration 

“These swimmers [above] would have just plunged into the water. To charge forward, they turn their bodies into waves,” says Lin.

Lin has a long list of artists he admires.  “Some who have influenced me the most are Bil Donovan, Carlos Aponte, Laura Laine, Charlie Harper, Oneq, Guangzhong Wu. I can go on and on. I’ve pinned tons of illustrations of these artists on Pinterest for inspiration and reference.”

“I know exceptionalism when I see it and it was obvious from the first class with Jianrong that he was in that category. – Bil Donovan, FIT Illustration professor and Society of Illustrators board member

“When I think of football, what comes to mind are strength, physical contacts, and how the players can be piled up in weird ways,” says Lin.

“What I learned from the illustration program is a combination of so many things. It can be a technique I learned in a life drawing class, or ways to observe the object I want to draw. It’s even some words a professor said to me that stuck in my head,” he says.

“Volleyball players will do everything to save the ball. I’m always fascinated by how they’re willing to get on the floor,” says Lin.

Meanwhile, “Yoga is all about flexibility and mindfulness, so I tried to keep the figures simple and soft, almost feather-like. The composition [below] was inspired by cabbages — You know when you cut those purple cabbages in half and discover the wonderful patterns!” says Lin.

“For sure, without what I learned in FIT’s illustration program, I wouldn’t be able to create this series. I’m very grateful for it.”

Says Ed Soyka, Chair of Illustration, “He took what he learned and translated it into a personal, creative and fantastic artistic vision of his own.”

See more of Jianrong Lin’s work at JianrongLin.com or Instagram @Jianrong_Lin

Images used with permission.

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