Fashion Week in Milan Part 2!

HELLO EVERYONE!

This week I will continue to share with you the trip of Fashion week in Milan!

On our second part of the trip, there was still so much to discover. We made a stop at La Scala Laboratories, located in the Zona Tortona. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan is among the world’s most famous opera houses. At their Laboratory we were able to see where the magic begins and moves along onto the stage. Most of the handmade works for the production of stage design emerge from there. From set design, sculpture, carpentry works, mechanics workshop, set assembly, costume design, laundry, etc.

Teatro La Scala Ansaldo Workshops

Teatro La Scala Ansaldo Workshops

The next day we visited S2B press office specialized in public relations towards the fashion design industry. We had a very informative tour in their loft office about a few of the rising young designers they are working with. Some of their services include advertising planning, events production, product placement & celebrities, social media management, and image consulting!

Image from S2B Press Office Loft

Image from S2B Press Office Loft (from website)

The last two days were a dream come true! Our final stop was at Pino Grasso Atelier, a master of embroidery for the most renowned haute couture and ready to wear fashion houses. Some important clients include: Givenchy, Valentino, Dolce & Gabbana. I was mesmerized by all the handmade work and countless number of hours put into a garment. There are many countless possibilities when it comes to embroidery and materials, from beads to sequins, feathers to fringes. They even work with designers to create innovative solutions for design requests, like flowers from plastic bottles!

Me trying embroidery techniques for the first time!

Me trying embroidery techniques for the first time!

Handmade samples from work for clients.

Handmade samples from work for clients.

Our trip to Milan was so rich of adventures with enriching information for the student’s fashion career start!

Arrivederci, Maria