World’s Fair Site: can you get there from here?

New_York_World's_Fair_August_1964(Thank you, Wikipedia, for this image of the Queen’s World’s Fair site from August, 1964!)

We interrupt the longer blog post we’re frantically working on to bring you this urgent debate concerning one of New York City’s most interesting historic sites.  I know you Manhattanites have trouble crossing water, but waaaayy out in Flushing Meadows stands a relic of our glorious past:

http://tinyurl.com/ksekury

021814worldsfair(Thank you to wallyg for this image from https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=wallyg%2C%20pavilion)

This structure, the “Tent of Tomorrow”, was designed by architect Philip Johnson.

(http://www.architecturaldigest.com/architecture/archive/johnson_article_032001)

The world’s fair site in Flushing Meadows was part of Robert Moses’ larger project to refurbish the area from it’s past as a dumping ground for industrial ash (which was referred to in the Great Gatsby.)  The project was funded privately, and lost participants when it remained unsanctioned by the Bureau of International Exhibitions.  Nonetheless, the 1964-1965 World’s Fair in Flushing, Queens, hosted 51 million visitors.

You can find out more of the background on the site here:

http://tinyurl.com/ma35ace

What do you think?  What happens when prophetic-seeming Tomorrow-lands become rusty Yesterday-lands?  Should these buildings be saved or torn down?  What should Flushing Meadows Park be used for?  How much of our history do we need to preserve?

 

 

 

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