Author Archives: Michael Cokkinos

Sustainable Cuisine

WHAT IS SUSTAINABLE GREEN CUISINE?


Green Cuisine encourages a regional food supply and a strong local economy, it maintains a sense of community, encourages earth stewardship, and protects the future of small to medium-size family farms. It is approaching the farm, the ranch, the ocean, the vineyard and the dairy as an ecosystem that thrives through careful management of natural resources. It boils down to three parts: environmental, economic an social sustainability.

Join Culinary Arts for a SUSTAINABLE STIR FRY Demonstration on Thursday, November 15 at 1PM in A734

 

 

 

Ecological / Environmental
• Organic/Biodynamic agriculture
• More Nutritious Food and less Packaging and waste
• Improve Soil Quality
• Improve Water Quality
• Promote Biodiversity
• Energy Conservation / Food does not have to travel hundreds of miles

Economic
• Support Local / True Economy
Social / Political
• Better Tasting Food / Variety
• Help Small Farmers
• Reduce your Bodies Chemical Burden
• Protect Farm Worker’s Health
• Food Safety through traceability

Sustainable and seasonal cuisine has many benefits, not the least of which is great taste. It is also great fun to know that you are cooking and eating great food grown or harvested by local artisans. Let the flavors of seasonal produce and raw ingredients speak for themselves and inspire your cooking, the flavor will always be outstanding.

One good premise to follow is to focus on locally grown vegetables.

Here is a simple recipe for Roast Asparagus

Easy to do in a toaster oven. You can even substitute other vegetables like cauliflower, or Brussels sprouts so be creative.

Wash and trim about an inch off the Asparagus stalk. Shake dry. Place on the oven dish or cookie sheet. drizzle with some extra virgin olive oil and season with Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper. Roast at 400F for about 20 min or until the vegetables show some browning. Serve with some fresh lemon juice.

The Fountian of Youth discovered in Your Kitchen

JOIN FIT CULINARY ARTS ON NOVEMBER 15th, 1-2 in A734 for a SUSTAINABLE VEGETARIAN DEMONSTRATION

That’s right FIT it’s not what you put on your skin but what goes inside that keeps you young and healthy. Antioxidant loaded fruits and veggies contain nature’s phytochemicals that beat anything that comes in a jar or tube. Plus eating more fruits and vegetables is sustainable and better for the earth.

Berries such as raspberries, blackberries, loganberries, blueberries, bilberries, and cranberries contain flavonols and anthocyanins, naturally occurring substances with strong anti-cancer properties. Frozen berries have the same nutrition benefits as fresh, so you can improve your health, even when fresh berries aren’t in season.

Citrus Fruits such as oranges, tangerines, lemons, limes, and grapefruit-all have vitamin C, a vitamin long associated with preventing the common cold. Vitamin C may also help reduce the risk of cancer and cataracts. In addition, citrus fruits contain limonese, a compound that may help the liver detoxify carcinogenic chemicals.

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, and brussels sprouts feature a substance called sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring compound in foods that neutralizes highly reactive, dangerous forms of cancer-causing chemicals before they can damage cells and promote cancer.

Garlic and other members of the allium family such as onions, scallions, shallots, chives and leeks are loaded with allicin and S-allylcysteine-compounds associated with reduced risk of cancer and heart disease.

Grapes, grape juice, and wine are sources of resveratrol, which protects against heart disease and fights the production and progression of cancerous tumors.

Nuts and seeds have heart-healthy monounsaturated fats. Nuts are good sources of vitamin E, which can prevent the oxidation of “bad” cholesterol and the resulting buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Nuts and seeds are also filled with selenium, another powerful antioxidant.

Olives and olive oil are monounsaturated fats, and this type of fat can help lower total blood cholesterol and increase the ratio of good cholesterol to bad. Improving blood cholesterol levels reduces the risk of heart disease.

Orange and yellow vegetables such as carrots, squash, sweet potatoes and pumpkin all contain beta-carotene-the substance that gives these vegetables their intense colors. Beta-carotene may reduce the risk of cancer and protect against cataracts.

Salmon although not vegetarian, is a particularly good source of omega-3 fat, a type of fat that has been shown to help thin blood and keep blood platelets from clotting and sticking to artery walls. The result is a lower risk of heart attack and stroke. Go for the wild salmon. It’s caught from a healthy wild stock with sustainable methods, is free of contaminants, and avoids the problems with farmed salmon, which can not only pollute local waters near the farm but also be polluted themselves because of the fish meal they’re fed. Plus I think it is much tastier than farmed salmon.

Tomatoes, especially in the form of tomato sauce, and other members of the nightshade family. Eggplant, tomatillos, cayenne and chili peppers contain a substance called lycopene, which research has shown may help to reduce the risk of prostate, colon, and bladder cancers. Chili peppers are a source of capsaicin, which is the compound that makes the peppers spicy hot. Capasicin has been shown to help prevent the growth of certain types of cancer and is a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

When cooking your healthy vegetables you’ll want to use healthy cookware too. In our upcoming demos we will be using the state of the art ceramic cookware for green cuisine from Xtrema.

JOIN FIT CULINARY ARTS ON NOVEMBER 15th, 1-2 in A734 for a

SUSTAINABLE VEGETARIAN DEMONSTRATION

October is Vegetarian Awareness Month – Meatless Mondays

Hey FIT – Try a Vegetarian Monday for the rest of October. You will be doing yourself and the planet a favor. Why not visit your local green market and get in on some of the Fall Harvest or order up the Vegetarian option at Aramark!

COME TO THE FIT CULINARY ARTS  SALSA DEMO

on THURSDAY 10/11 at 1PM in A734

 

Environmental Benefits
REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT. The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization estimates the meat industry generates nearly one-fifth of the man-made greenhouse gas emissions that are accelerating climate change worldwide . . . far more than transportation. And annual worldwide demand for meat continues to grow. Reining in meat consumption once a week can help slow this trend.
MINIMIZE WATER USAGE. The water needs of livestock are tremendous, far above those of vegetables or grains. An estimated 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into a single pound of beef. Soy tofu produced in California requires 220 gallons of water per pound.
HELP REDUCE FOSSIL FUEL DEPENDENCE. On average, about 40 calories of fossil fuel energy go into every calorie of feed lot beef in the U.S. Compare this to the 2.2 calories of fossil fuel energy needed to produce one calorie of plant-based protein. Moderating meat consumption is a great way to cut fossil fuel demand.

Health Benefits
LIMIT CANCER RISK: Hundreds of studies suggest that diets high in fruits and vegetables may reduce cancer risk. Both red and processed meat consumption are associated with colon cancer.
REDUCE HEART DISEASE: Recent data from a Harvard University study found that replacing saturated fat-rich foods (for example, meat and full fat dairy) with foods that are rich in polyunsaturated fat (for example, vegetable oils, nuts and seeds) reduces the risk of heart disease by 19%
FIGHT DIABETES: Research suggests that higher consumption of red and processed meat increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.
CURB OBESITY: People on low-meat or vegetarian diets have significantly lower body weights and body mass indices. A recent study from Imperial College London also found that reducing overall meat consumption can prevent long-term weight gain.
LIVE LONGER: Red and processed meat consumption is associated with increases in total mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality.
IMPROVE YOUR DIET. Consuming beans or peas results in higher intakes of fiber, protein, folate, zinc, iron and magnesium with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat.