Critiques

It’s incredible to think we’re nearing the home stretch of this FIT experience. It feels like not even a few days ago I was walking into orientation, wide eyed and ready to learn. Being at FIT has definitely broadened my horizons and taught me far beyond what I expected. Many of our lessons I’ve already been familiar with (I have a bit of experience in most of the Adobe suite, so all the introductions to the programs and basic lessons I had already knew) but the one thing I’ve been exposed to that I could never been on my own has been the class critiques. And let me tell you, I’m in love.

A critique is just about exactly what it sounds like, you take you work, present it in front of the class, and they tell you what they like/dislike, what you should add/remove, and/or any bit of advice or insight to further improve your work. I know, sounds daunting, but getting the opinions from others is one of the best possible things you can do for your work. Or at least, it’s one of the best I can do for mine.

After looking at the design for so long, I definitely can begin to get a little numb to it. It’s like when you get used to a smell because it’s been there so long, or when a song just becomes background noise since you’ve heard it so many times. Having a fresh set eyes look at it helps me notice some faults I didn’t realize was there, or realize my direction. Think back to the old writing exercise, which is to read your piece backwards in order to make sure it makes sense, since you’ve read it forward so many times and might just skip over the mistakes.

Not only are critiques great for your own artwork, but they’re also a great place to be heard and really show your knowledge. There’s always the fear that if you just go up to someone and tell them all the things you think could be improved you’d come off as rude, pretentious, and/or other negative descriptions. Critiques provide an open environment to let people know what you really feel, and give you the opportunity to talk about what you love. It’s a win win! In the end, critiques break the ice. At the beginning of my class, no one would really say anything regarding other people’s work. However, after participating in our first critique, it’s rare someone doesn’t make a comment as they’re walking about the room. Do critiques sound as daunting as they did in the beginning?

Have you participated in a critique, and if so, what’s your favorite/less favorite part? If you haven’t, what’s one thing you’ve learnt in your class that you couldn’t have learnt anywhere else?

As always,

Izzy

FIT Myths vs. Realities

For the most of us, we’ve done our fair amount of research on FIT before we finally arrived at the classes. I know I definitely did mine, especially going a bit past the official FIT site and information and onto testimonies from current students, alumni, and the like. However, after being in the school for almost a week, I’ve found that not all the preconceptions always match up to the truth. So, I’ve debunked some FIT myths just for you. My myth busting didn’t involve many explosions or potentially deadly experiments, so I do encourage you to try this at home (or campus, technically)!

Myth: Everyone dresses like they’re about to walk a runway, everyday.

Reality: It’s true: FIT students do bring it. But that doesn’t mean everyone is dressed and ready to be in the latest issue of Vogue. Plenty of people just like to dress comfortably (after all, some of us have to wake up pretty early to commute to those AM classes), and even those who dress to impress daily take a day off now and then. Plus, the wonderful thing about being in a school such as this is that individuality is admired, especially in the way you dress. Everyone always wants to see something new, so don’t be afraid to wear what you want to wear.

Myth: The fashion girls are super catty.

Reality: This is a common stereotype, but luckily for everyone it is not one that proves true. My magazine design class is filled with people who are also taking fashion courses during the PM sessions and I’ve also gotten the pleasure to get to know. They are some of the most interesting, kind, and thoughtful people I’ve ever met! Don’t let stereotypes get in the way to what could potentially be a lasting friendship.

Myth: I’m interested in art, but not really into fashion. I guess FIT really isn’t the school for me.

Reality: The FIT precollege program offers far more than just fashion classes! Whether you’re into photography, graphic design, drawing, even computer animation, FIT probably has a class that suits your needs. If this thought is what kept you for signing up for this summer, definitely look into the Saturday/Sunday Live (or workshop) classes in the fall or spring. Precollege really is a great place to learn more about your passion, and meet people with similar interests and goals.

Myth: I’m going to have to work really hard at FIT.

Reality: Actually, no, this isn’t a myth. You will definitely have to work hard, and push your limits. If you want to go to a class where you can sit around and not do much, you’ve come to the wrong place. No matter what class you take, you will have to fine tune your skills, get in the zone, and work like never before. However, if you’re taking a class doing the thing you love, then it will never be a chore.

The expectations of anything will never always meet the realities, so don’t rely on them. Instead, keep an open mind and don’t let other people’s thoughts and opinions cloud your own. Do you have your own FIT preconception that turned out to be nothing but a myth? Leave it in the comments below!

Talk to you soon,

Izzy

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Izzy

IsabellGeffner

Taking course:
HAD 150 Magazine Design 

AN INTRODUCTION, OF SORTS

So, yes, hello. My name is Isabell Geffner, Izzy for short, and I hail from Long Island. I am 16, and am currently going into my junior year of high school. This semester I will be losing my FIT virginity as I venture into the magazine design class in hopes of expanding my knowledge, meeting new people, and spending my summer doing the thing I love.

All my life I’ve had a thirst for knowledge, it could possibly be my most defining trait. Even if it’s the most seemingly irrelevant fact in the world, knowing for the sake of knowing is one of my greatest drives. I love being able to know everything I can, be it the fact that the word chivalry was derived from the French word for horse, cheval, or the fact that the first ever typeface was invented by Johannes Gutenberg, and was based off of the handwriting of the scribes, who had previously been the ones to create books. Knowing gives you a sense of understanding of the world around you, gives you new perspectives to look at, and information you could use in everyday life, even if you didn’t know you needed it.  I love knowing, and I believe that no matter how much you know, and no matter how long you’ve spent learning any topic, you could always know more. This need for knowledge is the driving factor in why I’m taking this class. I love design, I love talking about design (In fact, I never shut up. At this point most of my friends know the difference between a serif and sans serif typeface, and can properly identify between old style, transitional, and modern serif typefaces. I’m quite proud.), I love looking at intricate logos and thoughtful advertisements, and most importantly I love sitting down at my laptop and creating a poster or a website.

 My passion for design along with my passion for knowledge has brought me on a never ending quest, to learn all I can about design and use that knowledge to become the best designer I possibly can be. I’m so incredibly excited to be enrolled in this course, to be able to expand my horizons, grow as a designer (and hopefully a person) and continue on this quest. I hope you packed your armor, and brought along your cheval, because it’s going to be an exciting journey.

Until next time,

Izzy