Critiques

It’s incredible to think we’re nearing the home stretch of this FIT experience. It feels like not even a few days ago I was walking into orientation, wide eyed and ready to learn. Being at FIT has definitely broadened my horizons and taught me far beyond what I expected. Many of our lessons I’ve already been familiar with (I have a bit of experience in most of the Adobe suite, so all the introductions to the programs and basic lessons I had already knew) but the one thing I’ve been exposed to that I could never been on my own has been the class critiques. And let me tell you, I’m in love.

A critique is just about exactly what it sounds like, you take you work, present it in front of the class, and they tell you what they like/dislike, what you should add/remove, and/or any bit of advice or insight to further improve your work. I know, sounds daunting, but getting the opinions from others is one of the best possible things you can do for your work. Or at least, it’s one of the best I can do for mine.

After looking at the design for so long, I definitely can begin to get a little numb to it. It’s like when you get used to a smell because it’s been there so long, or when a song just becomes background noise since you’ve heard it so many times. Having a fresh set eyes look at it helps me notice some faults I didn’t realize was there, or realize my direction. Think back to the old writing exercise, which is to read your piece backwards in order to make sure it makes sense, since you’ve read it forward so many times and might just skip over the mistakes.

Not only are critiques great for your own artwork, but they’re also a great place to be heard and really show your knowledge. There’s always the fear that if you just go up to someone and tell them all the things you think could be improved you’d come off as rude, pretentious, and/or other negative descriptions. Critiques provide an open environment to let people know what you really feel, and give you the opportunity to talk about what you love. It’s a win win! In the end, critiques break the ice. At the beginning of my class, no one would really say anything regarding other people’s work. However, after participating in our first critique, it’s rare someone doesn’t make a comment as they’re walking about the room. Do critiques sound as daunting as they did in the beginning?

Have you participated in a critique, and if so, what’s your favorite/less favorite part? If you haven’t, what’s one thing you’ve learnt in your class that you couldn’t have learnt anywhere else?

As always,

Izzy

What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up?

What do you want to be when you grow up? A question asked to every single person under the age of 22 from their first day of kindergarten to the day they graduate college. I hate it because I think it’s a cop-out from adults who don’t know any other way to relate to kids. Who don’t know what to say or how to act so they try to relate in a way that they can understand. It’s a definition. A way to compartmentalized people into groups. All any of us want is definition. A way to explain everyone and everything.

I personally hate answering it because I feel some sort of commitment. Like after I say what I want to be that that’s it. That’s who I am and what I have to do. For the longest time when someone asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up the answer was plain and simple: a fashion designer. Now I have begun to change my mind. My definition of myself had changed, lines have been blurred, truths have been lost. My future isn’t so clear anymore. I don’t know what I want. Now my cop-out answer to that cop-out question is fashion designer because that’s simpler than the truth: I don’t know.

After writing this blog I have become interested in fashion journalism. Working for a magazine or some blog sounds like a lot of fun, who knows if in the next ten years there will still be real magazines.  I have turned into a thing I used to hate and have become what I thought I didn’t want, but what I realize now was that I didn’t know what I was talking about. I love writing about fashion, I love sharing my ideas with people. I have lost some motivation for sewing and designing but who knows. I have years ahead of me to decide, we all do. Nothing is really permanent. We put so much weight on decisions like college and career because we are afraid of making a mistake. But if we regarded these things with more of an open mind, and remembered that there is always room and time for a second chance, maybe things would be a little easier, and maybe we would all be a little happier.

Sophie

When Fashion Doesn’t Fit into High School

I love reading my fellow Precollege bloggers’ posts, and when I read Sophia’s post on fitting fashion into high school, I couldn’t help but feel a little envious. I’ve always wished I had gone to a creative school in Manhattan. Instead, I go to a public school in the suburbs of Long Island where all the money gets poured into a science research program that still can’t compete with those of some of the schools around.

Fashion is something I have always loved and felt a deep passion for. However, where I live, creativity really isn’t an admirable trait. The creative ones are discouraged from being who they really are; in fact, they are encouraged to pursue other interests. The creative ones are coincidentally the ones with bright blue hair and 10 different piercings, labeling them as the “art freaks”. Parents of the “art freaks” are looked down upon, since they did not raise their children in the same conservative way that the rest did.

The only respected kids are the ones that want to be doctors and lawyers; the ones that got into the Ivys (and the like) get a congratulatory hug from basically all of the school’s staff, while those going to art or fashion schools get a meek smile at best.

I used to succumb to the standards that were set upon me. My parents are very conservative, and I used to follow suit. However, this past month in Manhattan, as well as my classes at FIT, have taught me so much. Loving art or fashion is not a bad thing. Being creative is just as impressive as being good at math or science. Maybe it is even more impressive, since the creative ones are able to survive being torn down time and time again. I was never into math or science. I wanted to read, and write, and design. I wanted to create. I’ve finally accepted who I am and who I’m not.

Hiding myself away only made me miserable. Ever since I have started being more real with myself, I’ve been so much happier. I can’t wait to go to FIT this fall. I can’t wait to be in a place where I am fully accepted for who I am, what I love, and what I’m good at. I am so excited; I feel like I’m finally going to find my niche.

But something even more important that finally getting to go somewhere where I finally fit in is the realization that I should have never let other people get to me. I should have always just been myself. I should have never have tried to hide away the part of myself that so desperately wanted to be free.

I apologize for being so cliché, but don’t be ashamed of who you are. Once you really accept yourself and embrace who you truly are, others will follow suit. The only way to be truly happy in life is to be who you really are, not what other people want you or expect you to be.

Now I’m not saying that piercings and unnaturally colored hair necessarily correlate with being creative or loving art, but I have always wanted to have purple hair…

We’ll see

-Arielle

Introducing Precollege Blogger: Nicole

NicoleHeaneyColorHi everyone! My name is Nicole and yes red is my natural hair color. Now that that’s out of the way let’s get down to business. I am currently a junior in high school and I live on Long Island, New York. I discovered my love of fashion at a very young age. I remember the first time picking up a magazine and thinking to myself “ Wow look at all these different styles.” Ever since then it has been my goal to pursue a career in something I’m most passionate about, which is the fashion industry. When I’m not looking at the newest trends or browsing the racks at the mall, you can find me twirling flags with my color guard team, blogging and hanging out with my 4 year old sister. (Trust me I know it’s a big age difference)

This semester will be my first time attending the Precollege program at FIT. I am taking The Ins and Outs of Fashion Merchandising and I couldn’t be more excited. In the future, I hope to become a buyer. Analyzing the trends of what consumers are buying and deciding on the trends that will be coming out is what I am all about. Oh hey I’m a poet and I didn’t even know it! Wow sorry for that corny joke, but I felt like the timing was right. Last week was my first class and I was so excited that on the first day, I walked the wrong way for 3 blocks! That’s pretty embarrassing for someone who goes to New York City as often as I do, but hey it happens.

Like most other high school juniors, I was feeling really overwhelmed in deciding what to major in. All of my friends are going crazy trying to decide what they want to do and taking this Precollege class has kind of made me feel at ease. Stepping into FIT just feels right and every time I walk out with a smile. I’m so excited to see what is in store for this semester. Wow that was really sentimental, I think I need to go grab a tissue. Ok, I’m back now. Until next week, xoxo gossip girl.

Totally kidding. I can’t wait to share my experiences this semester with you all. Being able to blog for FIT is such a dream come true and I can’t wait to let you all know how class goes.

Until Next Time,

Nicole

Been There, Done That – An Interview With Precollege Alum Lilly Truscott

Lilly Truscott

This week, Precollege Programs had the opportunity to speak with FIT undergraduate student and Precollege alumni, Lilly Truscott. Lilly was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, but moved to Nashville, TN during high school. She is currently in her first semester at FIT, working towards her AAS in Advertising and Marketing Communications. After gaining her Associates Degree, Lilly plans to graduate with her BS in Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing.

Lilly currently works in the Precollege office through FIT’s Work-Study program, where she is able to share her experiences as a Precollege student with current students and parents.

Courses Taken in Precollege Programs:

HAD 146 Typography for Graphic Design
HFM 064 Business of Fashion

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