Dont Miss Me Too Much

Sadly, my class has come to an end. My mood board is being perfected and when I finish I will be emailing my professor for feedback. Now, I know all the skills I need to get into FIT. Professor Cutting made it easy and clear on how to make everything perfect and neat. He taught me how to photoshop my background, shade and cut out my fashion figures, how to cut swatches and how to make everything the best I can.

When my portfolio is complete, It will look something like this:

 

 

 

But, don’t miss me too much, FIT. In the summer I will be taking a sewing class to create a denim jacket to add to my portfolio. I will be focusing on my portfolio this summer and hopefully, I will be accepted into FIT. 

I am a dream chaser and I will not let anything stop me from accomplishing my goal. I hope one day I’ll become a big brand designer for swimwear and will be able to thank FIT. I highly recommend classes at FIT because it made everything seem possible and taught me things that I had no idea about in the past. Being successful means you have to work hard at everything you do and don’t let any obstacles break you or stop you from completing your goal. What is your goal in life? 

Keep in touch with me:

https://www.instagram.com/isabellaava11/

https://www.instagram.com/i_candy_blog/

~Isabella Basile

Last goodbyes and my experience with my photography class

Hi guys!

Unfortunately, this is the last blog I will be writing. Not only that, but this Saturday was my last day of photography class. I enjoyed this class so much. The first day I walked into the classroom I knew I was going to like it. My classmates were so nice and funny. That first week we took pictures of each other and talked to our classmates. The second week we also took photos of each other (aperture). The third week we shared our photos and received feedback. We also talked about different photography, looked at photos, and then went out and shot photos on our film cameras. The 4th week I missed class, so the 5th week I processed my film. Then the 6th and 7th week we processed the film. The 8th week we talked about our final project that we had to do — shoot studio. Then the 9th week we shared our photos and processed more photos.  The 10th week our portfolio was due and we also visited different galleries.

My favorite part of this class was learning how to process film. I learned so much and I really enjoyed it. I also enjoyed going outside and taking photos of our classmates, buildings,  and things we found interesting. Overall,  if you are into photography I think you will enjoy this class a lot. You will learn so much.

My least favorite part of the class, though, was waking up early. But once I got used to it, it wasn’t so bad.  I have really enjoyed writing blogs here. Unfortunately, I won’t be writing anymore, but if you want to see what I’m up to, check out my youtube channel. I hope you guys enjoyed reading my blogs like I enjoyed writing them.

Ciny Beal Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg76JCgl1n8oIVEfn-jDEQQ

~Cindy Beal

Childhood Dreaming Becomes a Reality

My substitute professor taught us how to draw a basic blouse and skirt. I’ve always liked drawing but I never know how to fit it on a body and make it look real.

My experience with FIT so far is amazing. I love getting out of bed every Saturday and knowing I’m going to a class for my dream school. Prof. Cutting is a wonderful teacher and he helps everyone as much as he can.

I also entered a contest for pockets and purses. I designed a bathing suit and a backpack with little pockets in it, to keep wax for your surfboard or sunscreen sticks. It is so fascinating seeing your sketch on tracing paper and transferring it to marker paper, watching it come alive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This contest was introduced March 17th. Three students from the  who run the program took the class down to the museum to see how pockets and purses have evolved through the years.

Here are some photos:

~Bella Basile

Get Out Of the “Dark” About Darkroom Photography

Traditional film and darkroom processes have been undeniably dying out over the past several decades with the invention of the digital camera. The new generation of photographers is following an interesting trend, though, with a sudden enthusiasm for the film medium. It’s a craze led by the likes of Gucci muse Petra Collins that can be compared to the record player: trend in music, people seem to believe that film is more “raw,” “real,” and creative.

Sheets of rolls of film.

Last class, when had my second experience with traditional black and white manual photography, I worked on developing film. If you aren’t familiar with this, there’s an entire process including working in the darkroom, that allows photos that are taken on a roll of film to be accessed. The whole process of development is multilayered and can be stressful for a beginner, especially in the darkrooms; a pitch-black environment that is essential for the photos to not be ruined because they are light-sensitive materials. After processing the roll of film, it is soaked in chemical baths and left to dry. This process allows you to access only 36 photos that one cannot see until the end, meaning that there is no way to tell if the shots will appear until you take out the photos and set them to dry. This is the risqué nature of the medium that some people reference as more artful than digital.

I interviewed photography instructor Cornelia Hediger to create an exposé on the ins and outs of traditional darkroom film, in comparison to digital photography.

Q: Do you prefer digital or film photography, and why?

A: Overall, I prefer the look and quality of a darkroom print vs a digital print. A traditional printed image, shot on film, has grain. I love the look of grain printed on fiber based paper. You cannot beat that look. It is absolutely stunning.

Q: What are some of the advantages of darkroom photography? What are some of the disadvantages?

A: The advantage of darkroom photography is that you have a negative to work from, versus a digital file. Each image is unique as the prints are done by a person and not a machine. A darkroom print still looks superior to me than a digital file printed in black and white. There are some very nice papers out there that mimic the look of a traditional fiber based print. Definitely, the paper and technology have come a long way and prints, produced with digital files, are starting to look better. The ‘disadvantage’ of a darkroom print is the time factor. It takes longer to produce a darkroom print versus a digital print.

Q: What is your favorite aspect of black and white film photography?

A: My favorite aspect of black and white film photography is that I absolutely love the process. I love to develop film and I love printing in the darkroom. I find it magical to watch an image come up in the developer and I like the slower process of producing an image. In the end, I also prefer the look of a black and white image printed on fiber based paper vs. a digitally produced image.

Q: For young photographers, do you recommend that they learn how to use both film and digital cameras? Do you consider film photography an essential for photographers?

A: I think it is a good idea for young photographers to learn shooting with film and at least experience the process in the darkroom. Film ‘forces’ you to slow down and perhaps be more responsible when taking an image. Each image is recorded on a negative and cannot be deleted like you would delete a digital image. Personally, I find the experience of learning how to take images with film/print in the darkroom essential when learning photography. To some people, it opens up a whole new world whereas others will find the process a slow and tedious one.

Q: Do you think darkroom photography will ever go “extinct”?

A: I do not know if darkroom photography will ever go extinct. In the fine arts, it seems to be making a comeback. The masses and everyday household will not turn around and go back to film. It seems that film and traditional darkroom printing is perhaps surviving through the arts. I have no idea, however, how photography will develop over the next decades.
-End of Interview

Chloe Abidi

Introducing Precollege Intern: Mahalia

Photo by Romy Weng

Hi! My name is Mahalia, I’m a photographer in the making, and I am an intern here at FIT’s Precollege Program. My passion for art, more specifically photography, was what brought me to FIT. I enjoy exploring different learning methods of art in different environments, and FIT is an incredible place for me to approach photography with a mindset on social components.

Out of all the different kinds of pictures I enjoy taking, landscapes, fashion, sports, etc. I adore taking portraitures. What caught my eye, was something about how humans react when they are on camera. People say you cannot judge a book by its cover, but I believe that a picture is worth a thousand words and more.

My goal in life is to become a professional photographer and be my own boss, which will require that I work extremely hard to reach that goal. In 2016 and 2017 I took classes at International Center of Photography (ICP) which taught me mostly about manual photography. However, right now I am focused more on the depth of digital photography and photoshop. Because not that many people know me, I also am learning how to network. Whenever I take pictures I am really fond of, I post them on an official photography Instagram account (@photo_moro) in order to make myself more known to the public.

Because I am a senior in high school, I deal with plenty of work and deadlines which builds stress for me. Coming from an artistic family, I find not only photography but art in general a stress reliever and much more. To me, art is something extremely fun and wonderful. Art makes the person I am today.

Mahalia :-)