Guest Post: Felipe Muhr, MFA ’15 Curates Latin American Art Show

Migratory Patterns
I came with my heart full of Sinatra
March 20 – 22, 2015
Opening Friday March 20, 2015. 6:00-9:00PM
CuatroH – 56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11237. Fourth Floor

Migratory Patterns
showcases the works of nine young artists who were raised in Latin America but have lived and worked in the US in recent years. The exhibition looks to acknowledge that working and exhibiting as artists in the US entails the adoption of a different set of parameters through which these art works are experienced. As Latin Americans, these artists question the prevalence of the stereotypes that surround their practices and the frictions that are created when producing work that is to be read in
both contexts.
Each piece in the show embodies a particular point of view, recreating the complexity of a territory often read through a single narrative. Migratory Patterns provides an opportunity to discuss issues such as immigration, travel, memory, socio-political differences and to open a dialogue in terms of representation between the artists’ home countries and the United States, from a critical perspective.

sebayork_1Adalberto Camperos will be showing his illustrated book Seba York. The work is a result  of his experience in NY while he was still a student at FIT. Through his work, Camperos revisits the notion of New York, not as the luminous city that houses Times Square, but as a disenchanted and dry place that overwhelms him as an ex-pat. Through his drawing practice, a broken-hearted Camperos analyses the food truck culture, the chaotic MTA system, the “do it yourself” philosophy, the sophisticated attires of the locals, and the refined art scene.

felipe muhr pato donald1Current MFA ’15 student Felipe Muhr participates in the show with How to Draw Donald Duck, a large-format drawing based on the Donald Duck comics he used to read as a child in Santiago de Chile and that later became the topic for his written research at FIT. Through his reading of translated, censured and re-edited Donald Duck comic books, Muhr encounters an US American reality that had been renegotiated for the Chilean context. In the spirit of William Hogarth’s diagrams, Muhr replicates backgrounds, objects and graphic gestures found in Donald Duck’s Latin American comics, creating a fictitious manual which revisits the standardized parameter of a commercial drawing form. http://felipemuhr.com

The exhibit also showcases photography, sound, video, performance, sculpture and drawing by Alejandro Yoshii, México; Constanza Alarcón, Chile; Luciana Pinchiero, Argentina; Margarita Sánchez Urdaneta, Colombia; Maricruz Alarcón, Chile; Orlando De la Garza, México; and Paz Ortúzar, Chile.

For the love of Chimps: Nathaniel Gold MFA ’11

Today marks another chapter in Nathaniel Gold’s life-long ambition to be “The Chimp Artist.” Nathaniel has long been a lover and a champion for the rights of chimpanzees. What began as an MA  capstone project and continued with Nathaniel’s MFA Visual Thesis presentation, has grown in unexpected ways, from a regular column in Scientific American online to today-the opening of Nathaniel’s collaborative show, Equality and Individuality,  in Vero Beach, Florida.  All proceeds will go to the Save the Chimps organization and the preservation of the animals so near and dear to us all, but especially to Nathaniel. The show runs from May 1 to June 1. Great work, Nathaniel and best of luck to you!