Hello from South Carolina! : Guest Post by Faculty Aya Kakeda

Hello from South Carolina!
I was invited to an Artist Residency from  at
The Children’s Museum of the Upstate in Greenville South Carolina.
Thank you to the Museum and also to the
National Endowment for the Arts Foundation for the grant.
The Children’s Museum is having an exhibition called Hello Japan, introducing children to the old traditional as well as new Japanese culture such as Karaoke,
Prikura, Harajyuku Fashion, Manga, Anime, etc.
I was invited to do four workshops and an artist talk during this residency.
My workshop was about a simple way to make characters. It was fantastic to work with kids (and adults) during the workshop.
They were amazing once they got the “how to” part down-
they really got into it and created many of their own characters.
workshop2 workshop4 workshop6 workshop11
Here is a link to a TV show that museum president Nancy Halverson and I were invited to. You can see the exhibition here and very small part of what I did at the workshop.
You can see more of Aya’s work here.

As promised…

What a day we had this past Saturday! Our newly conferred MFA in Illustration students, grads now, delivered a workshop to junior year students from the High School of Art and Design in New York City, in partnership with the Society of Illustrators in NY. Professor Anelle Miller, who is also the Executive Director of the Society of Illustrators and Chair Melanie Reim, worked with the FIT students to develop the workshop.

Han

girls

Felipe JorgeScott Shun

Our FIT grads were fantastic teachers, ushering over twenty students though an afternoon of visual storytelling and explorations of media that included clay to make 3D characters, printmaking, color paintings, experiments with black ink and collage. The high school students blew us away. They are super talented, imaginative, smart and were all a pleasure to work with. They created amazing stories and characters. We all had such a fun day!

This program is a complement to the Visual Thesis Exhibition in Gallery FIT at the Museum at FIT. The exhibit will be up through July 3- so do not miss it!

 

Mouse

Visual Thesis Exhibition Opens!

Final Postcard Exit Lines Front

Exit Lines, the MFA in Illustration Visual Thesis Exhibition, 2015, is open in Gallery FIT, the Museum at FIT. Nine illustrators have filled the gallery with works that move and emerge on the walls. Explore Times Square in 3D with Scott Fowler, visit the studios of artists vicariously through the work of Lynsey Hirth, travel on an animated journey through the Museum of Natural History with Han Yuan Yu, groove to rock classics and the interpretations with Jorge Saldana, just to name a few! Kudos to the class and to Professor Dennis Dittrich for leading another successful year towards the exhibition.

class

 

 

shun wall

Bruno

hollis

felipe wall

lynsey wall

jorge

ligangFor the first time this year, our students have developed arts programming in partnership with the Society of Illustrators and the High School of Art and Design, led by Professor Anelle Miller. We’ll be posting pics from that, too, so come back!

Cristy Road, MFA ’17 to speak at Conference

733c0d_94330b8cbed54a2db539d21996d7cb7f.png_srz_p_980_160_75_22_0.50_1.20_0Our own Cristy Road will be a speaker at the conferences below. Cristy’s voice, through her art, is a force. She urges, “Please come out and support the queer demographic of the comics world, watch us overcome our historical battles with visibility and inclusion via sick publications! +Checkout my website for xtra info on my life: www.croadcore.org

QUEERS AND COMICS LGBT CARTOONISTS CONFERENCE
May 7th-8th 2015 
@Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies (CLAGS) The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY 

Queers & Comics Conference celebrates, explores and analyzes queer cartoonists and their work. The Queers & Comics Conference will offer two days of panels, workshops, portfolio reviews, and slideshow presentations, as well as an exhibition of queer cartoon art. Ill be participating in the Queer characters of Color Panel, and Memoir: Discovering Queer Identities panel. For more details, please visit http://www.clags.org/queers-comics/

                                                           FLAME CON: NYC’S FIRST QUEER COMIC CONVENTION 11064670_863397047063645_7493241193160828183_o
Saturday, June 13th 2015

@Grand Prospect Hall, Brooklyn NY
Flame Con will be a one-day comics, arts, and entertainment expo showcasing creators and celebrities from all corners of LGBTQ geek fandom, including comics, video games, film, and television.For more info please visit www.flamecon.org

Guest Post: Margo Dabaie, MFA ’13, Paying it Forward with Comics

Earlier this month, I had the unique experience of being invited to teach students from the High School of Art and Design about the fundamentals of comic-making. It was a workshop held in conjunction with Will Eisner Week (http://www.willeisnerweek.com/) at the Society of Illustrators in New York.

9h01quMN5lSamWMu7jp2CYETpvj7spP3o-vN8GHtTNQI co-taught the workshop with
Sara Woolley and
N. Stephen Harris, two cartoonists whose works and careers are quite different from mine. We meant it this way, so that we could highlight our unique paths as ways for the students to eventually get their comics work published. Since the students were coming from a magnet art school, we knew they would already know how to draw technically and wanted to challenge them with the storytelling aspects of comics.
After brief introductions by Danny Fingeroth—who discussed Will Eisner’s biography, accomplishments, and how Eisner’s life culminated into a weeklong celebration of comics—and by each of us to give an idea of the kind of work we did, we dove into the hands-on part of the workshop. As a warm-up, we had the students work on comic jams. They split into pairs, made tiny, blank books out of single sheets of paper, and worked on comics together, one page at a time at two minutes per page before passing the book to their partner—sort of like a comics version of Exquisite Corpse. The resulting comics are almost invariably goofy and the students got a kick out of them. But the exercise also helps with drawing loosely and prioritizing the comics style of pacing more than the end product looking beautiful. As a bonus, they also now know how to make a very inexpensive mini-comic out of a single sheet of paper.
We then asked the students to design a character onto a model sheet we supplied and segued into creating a fully completed one-page comic with panel templates. We emphasized thinking of characters that weren’t too complicated. It’s easy to forget sometimes how comics require you to draw the same character over and over!
Watching the students work on their own projects and talking about them was the funnest part for me.

nosO5tZ4xFgCL31X3I1na_MgoqKhdrVvton0dcv2nfMI loved hearing the stories they had in mind because they were always really ornate and involved (I definitely had to drop some gentle reminders that there’s only one page to work with!). It was clear the students were fans of comics and were excited to make work. We had this opportunity to talk more informally with the students as well, and some were very interested in the paths we had taken as artists. It was great to be able to discuss what steps they might take after high school. They also knew their drawing chops and I got to appreciate that!
We’re glad we were able to take the opportunity to impart any information that could help the students in their future art careers; I got to enjoy their energy and innovation.

Thank you, Margo! We are really proud of you!–Melanie

Guest Post: Felipe Muhr, MFA ’15 Curates Latin American Art Show

Migratory Patterns
I came with my heart full of Sinatra
March 20 – 22, 2015
Opening Friday March 20, 2015. 6:00-9:00PM
CuatroH – 56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11237. Fourth Floor

Migratory Patterns
showcases the works of nine young artists who were raised in Latin America but have lived and worked in the US in recent years. The exhibition looks to acknowledge that working and exhibiting as artists in the US entails the adoption of a different set of parameters through which these art works are experienced. As Latin Americans, these artists question the prevalence of the stereotypes that surround their practices and the frictions that are created when producing work that is to be read in
both contexts.
Each piece in the show embodies a particular point of view, recreating the complexity of a territory often read through a single narrative. Migratory Patterns provides an opportunity to discuss issues such as immigration, travel, memory, socio-political differences and to open a dialogue in terms of representation between the artists’ home countries and the United States, from a critical perspective.

sebayork_1Adalberto Camperos will be showing his illustrated book Seba York. The work is a result  of his experience in NY while he was still a student at FIT. Through his work, Camperos revisits the notion of New York, not as the luminous city that houses Times Square, but as a disenchanted and dry place that overwhelms him as an ex-pat. Through his drawing practice, a broken-hearted Camperos analyses the food truck culture, the chaotic MTA system, the “do it yourself” philosophy, the sophisticated attires of the locals, and the refined art scene.

felipe muhr pato donald1Current MFA ’15 student Felipe Muhr participates in the show with How to Draw Donald Duck, a large-format drawing based on the Donald Duck comics he used to read as a child in Santiago de Chile and that later became the topic for his written research at FIT. Through his reading of translated, censured and re-edited Donald Duck comic books, Muhr encounters an US American reality that had been renegotiated for the Chilean context. In the spirit of William Hogarth’s diagrams, Muhr replicates backgrounds, objects and graphic gestures found in Donald Duck’s Latin American comics, creating a fictitious manual which revisits the standardized parameter of a commercial drawing form. http://felipemuhr.com

The exhibit also showcases photography, sound, video, performance, sculpture and drawing by Alejandro Yoshii, México; Constanza Alarcón, Chile; Luciana Pinchiero, Argentina; Margarita Sánchez Urdaneta, Colombia; Maricruz Alarcón, Chile; Orlando De la Garza, México; and Paz Ortúzar, Chile.

BEHIND THE BLING: LECTURE WITH NORA KRUG!

Behind the Bling Letter.72Where better to have a lecture that highlights bling than at FIT?!
The MFA in Illustration Program, School of Graduate Studies is so excited to bring the first lecture in a series that will highlight the stories of award winning projects- you know, the bling that acknowledges the admiration of one’s peers for an illustration. Now, we all know that an award is not the only barometer of good work- not by a long shot- but it is a great thrill and sense of accomplishment.

So, how does it happen? What is the journey? Nora Krug will be on our campus, telling us the story behind her bling- the prestigious Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators in New York for Shadow Atlas, an encyclopedia of ghosts. The art director, Enrico Fiammelli, will join us from ITALY in live time! We are so excited and will remind you again- SAVE the DATE! Wednesday, March 18, 6:30 pm in Katie Murphy Amphitheatre. Open to the public! Spread the word!!

Written Thesis and Beyond: Scott Fowler, MFA’15 at SUNY Symposium

The written thesis is an important component of our curriculum and requirement for degree conferral. The topics have been broad and far reaching and so very interesting. While working on it, our students discover the inner writer, the academic, the researcher, and ultimately, become an authority on his/her chosen topic. And- the papers do not simply sit on the shelves. This month alone, three of our grads are lecturing on their topics, taking part in a panel discussion, in talks with a book publisher and exhibiting at a the SUNY Graduate Research Poster Symposium.

It was a proud day for FIT, and for me, as I saw Scott Fowler mount the incredible poster that he created, speaking to all the wonderful projects and opportunities that have followed his thesis defense last April, on Illustrating Black, the story of the African American Illustrator. One could say that I am a bit biased, but when you see a poster like this, can you blame me?

Scott.poster

Guest Blog: Jennifer Merz, MFA’14 writes about SCBWI

From the time that we first met Jenn, her first love was for writing and illustrating children’s books. So who better to get a report about the SCBWI conference. Take a read below and to see more about Jenn, click here:

REPORT FROM THE TRENCHES: Seven Lessons from the 16th Annual SCBWI Winter Conference

By now, you know that I am a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and that this international, professional organization is key for any creative person in children’s books, whether newbie or pro, or in between.  This organization provides encouragement, support, and information on all aspects of the business.

So, you know that I was thrilled to attend this year’s SCBWI Winter Conference in New York: a three-day affair for over 1400 people held in the swanky halls and conference rooms of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, in Grand Central Station. While I have attended several times in years’ past (different venues), I felt ready to plunge back in, to pick up where I left off before I took a 3-year hiatus to attend FIT for my MFA Degree.

While I didn’t attend Friday’s Intensives, I entered my portfolio in Friday’s Art Directors’ Review.  No prizes for me, but I did get the chance to see a plethora of portfolios on display.  Competition, Baby, competition! Many illustrators had already been published, and most portfolios were of very high quality.  Conference Lesson # 1:  Raise Your Game!

On Saturday, YA writer Anthony Horowitz kicked off events with a humorous, informative speech on how to grab young readers from first line to last.  He spoke of looking for “light bulb moments” to give your writing authority of tone and truthfulness of character.  Never write down for children, he advised.  Make the children rise up.  Lesson # 2: Kids are Smart.  Don’t Patronize Your Audience.

This was followed by an Editors’ Panel, a Report from the Front Lines, by four distinguished publishers.  My best take-aways were Laura Godwin’s remark that we are going into a Renaissance of the picture book, even though adult titles are currently flat; and Stephanie Owens Lurie’s advice for writers and illustrators to ‘look broader’ than just having the goal of publishing one story.  (She also said that kids prefer hardcopies over eBooks!)

My first break-out session was with Ben Rosenthal of Katherine Tegen Books on Creating Nonfiction.  His advice “not to overvalue information over narrative” gave me food for thought re: my picture book proposal on the Triangle Factory Fire.  I will need to take another look at that…  It was wonderful to hear that literary non-fiction is desirable now.  Lesson # 3: Narrative, Narrative, Narrative (even in nonfiction).

I also had a break-out session with agent Heather Alexander (Pippin Properties) onDeveloping Your Brand and Career Path.  This event was disappointing to me, however, perhaps because so much of the info was familiar to me from my FIT classes.  Heather also had tech problems, and that didn’t help, either.

Saturday ended with two dynamite presentations to the entire conference: Hervé Tullet of wide-spread picture-book fame declared his love for producing books that express ideas, those that might shock or provoke.  Like Eric Carle’s books-as-toys before him, Hervé aims for freedom from the expected, books that are engaging as toys. Lesson # 4: Take Risks!

Kami Garcia, author of teen novel Beautiful Creatures, concluded Sat. night’s events, speaking of her publishing experience.  She took many risks in creating her book since she was not writing to be published, but writing for the love of her teen readers’ group.  (Kami is a teacher.)  She advised: Who is reading your book? Who is your tribe?  Lesson # 5: Write for Your Audience, Not to ‘Get Published’.

 

As if Saturday’s events weren’t enough, I kid you not when I say that Sunday’s were evenBETTER.  Please keep reading!

Picture book writer/illustrator and Caldecott Honor winner Laura Vaccaro Seeger was first up on Sunday morning with a CAPTIVATING presentation. Her generous display included sketchbooks, journals, and lists, giving all of us a peek into her incredible process.  She showed us how she creates her deceptively simple concept books, reminiscent of the work of Lois Ehlert, and how all fits together like a Rubik’s cube.  She spoke of the power of certain words, and leaving something to the imagination.  I was mesmerized and told her so later on.  Lesson # 6:  Be True to Your Vision.

James Dashner of Maze Runner fame was up next, with a humorous speech on Writing Commercial Fiction, followed by an Agent Panel.

The last speaker of the day, however, was the one that truly brought down the house.  Newbery Winner Kwame Alexander was simply electric!! In an engaging presentation,Saying Yes to the Writerly Life, the talk centered on his own writing journey, and was peppered with his emotionally-charged poems (yes, there were tears flowing…), and was infused with his humor, his advice, his humility, his charisma.  Working the room like a powerful preacher, he asked the crowd, “How are you going to live this writerly life?” Answer: “Not just sitting in a room writing; it’s about getting out there and living,” he advised.   Woven into the info and narrative was the lesson to say yes to opportunities that come your way, and the mantra: “Do not let other peoples’ “NOs” define your Yes.”   That bears repeating:  Lesson # 7: Do Not Let Other Peoples’ “Nos” Define Your “Yes”!

Needless to say, I bought Kwame’s Newbery book, The Crossover, and had him sign it to me, too.  I told him how enthralled I was by his speech, and that I was moved to tears when he’d recited his poem on his daughter’s growing up, adding that my own daughter had just gotten married.  He replied, with an impish grin, “Then you know what that’s all about.”  Indeed, I do.  Thank you, Kwame.
Then we all went home, tired but inspired, and ready to take up the challenge of our work once again.
Until next time,
Creatively yours,
Jenn

THAT’S NOT ALL-

55th Long Island Artists ExhibitionJenn will be speaking about her own book,
and Visual Thesis Project, SEW STRONG, on Long Island.

 

 

Speaking Out of School

Screen Shot 2015-02-07 at 10.26.34 PMEven after earning an MA degree in Art History, and a successful Kickstarter campaign, first year student Robert Geronimo wanted more- and we are so glad he did! Now earning his MFA, Robert is busy in AND out of school He has been invited to speak on a panel at the Ceres Gallery in Chelsea alongside Elizabeth Nyamayaro, Director of UN Women and the head of the HeforShe campaign! He will discuss his work on Little Maia and Agent 87; both of which demonstrate gender equality. Call to reserve a seat! The talk is on March 11th. Congratulations, Robert!