Tag Archives: Video

TATTOO ARTISTS IN MOTION, PART ONE: VICTOR MODAFFERI

Hue’s fall 2013 issue profiled five FIT alumni who have become some of the most successful tattoo artists in New York City. In addition to being interviewed and getting photographed, each one offered a brief tattooing lesson on video. We’ll be posting one a week for the next five weeks.

First up is Victor Modafferi, Illustration ’94, who shows viewers his tattooing setup.

Modafferi tattoos exclusively in black and gray, which allows for subtle shading. An artist working in color would have a different set of ink caps.

Enjoy! — and let us know what you think.

HUE HEARTS MOVING PARTS

In the Spring issue of Hue, Assistant Professor Sean Cormier shows off FIT’s state-of-the-art textile-testing lab. Manufacturers of clothing and other textiles subject each item to rigorous testing, to make sure it doesn’t tear too easily or wrinkle too much or burn too fast or fade too strongly in the laundry or rub off on an unsuspecting sofa… you get the point.

The pictures tell the story pretty nicely, in Hue’s humble (and insanely biased) opinion, but if a picture is worth a thousand words, then this video of the testing lab’s machines in action, at 24 frames per second, is worth almost 2 million words. That’s almost twice as long as the longest novel in history, In Search of Lost Time. You’d be a fool not to watch.

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64 COLLEGES AND FIT AIN’T ONE

Hip-hop artists will have to add another topic to their traditional repertoire of money, women, and violence: Higher ed.

That’s right, B. Martin, winner of HOT 97’s Who’s Next competition, has released a surprisingly danceable “SUNY Anthem,” an homage to his alma mater, SUNY Albany (where he earned a 4.0, mind you), and the 63 other colleges in the system. And Hue cannot stop singing it.

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Martin has certainly read up on the message points. For example,

My momma is proud that I could hold it down / And picked a school that wouldn’t ruin her bank account.

And:

The student association / Repping the population / Of students on the campus / Making sure they got a say in / Everything from groups and shows and who they sponsor / So let ’em know you want me at your next concert.

Note the subtle self-promotion at the end there. We’re on to you, B.

Um, why aren’t the cheerleaders trying harder to reach him? There isn’t a barricade or security guards, ladies.

Bummer that FIT wasn’t mentioned even once! You’d think he might have slipped in a nod to possibly the most prominent fashion-industry school on earth. He’s got scenes of cheerleaders trying to tickle him, kids measuring the circumference of a tree, and a runner nearly collapsing after a poorly attended race, but not a dress form in sight.

“After careful analysis, I have concluded that this is a tree.”

He managed to rhyme “New Paltz” with “sixty-four” and “Cortland” with “walk in,” but he couldn’t slip in FIT? FYI, it rhymes with “dream,” “team,” “free,” and “oh, gee.”

This runner looks tired.

Mr. Martin, might we recommend an additional stanza, just for fairness?

Lest I forget ’bout my kickin’ homies down at FIT / Where design and business students study 46 majors, not to mention PE / Led by Dr. Brown, the school has great renown / And I contracted one grad to make a wedding gown.

Otherwise, bravo.

BOOTS = HEIGHT x FASHION

Hue recently acquired a top-secret video in conjunction with the graduate student exhibition, Boots: The Height of Fashion, running through April 6.

The video you are about to watch, produced for a graduate studies class, has scenes that have been deemed both informative and amusing, and potentially inappropriate for a museum audience. Consider yourself warned.

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Powerful stuff indeed. Hue is still puzzling over the lessons learned. Here are the facts:

Boots are the height of fashion. Given that the word “of” signifies multiplication, boots = height(figurative) x fashion.

Boots make women feel powerful, the corollary being that boots are a danger to anyone in the path of their wearers. In mathematical terms, boots = danger.

The higher the boot, the more powerful the wearer. Making a simple substitution, height(literal) is proportional to danger.

Finally, boots are sex, status, and rebellion. Therefore, boots = sex + status + rebellion.

Solving for fashion, then:

Fashion = boots / height(f)

Fashion = danger / height(f)

Fashion : height(l) / height(f)

From this we can learn that fashion is proportional to the literal height of the boot divided by its figurative height.

Also, height(f) = (sex + status + rebellion) / fashion

Solving for sex:

Sex + status + rebellion = fashion x height(f)

Sex = fashion x height(f) – status – rebellion

In other words, sex is nothing more than the height of fashion minus status and rebellion.

Hue senses a pun in here somewhere.

HUE GETS REALLY REALLY CLOSE TO 35,000 BEES

In the latest issue of Hue, Nick Parisse, Photography and the Digital Image ’09, takes readers on a tour of his beehive. Flip through the issue online here; the bee feature appears on page 14-15.

Hue got up close and personal with the bees over the summer. Check out this video by Alex Joseph, Hue‘s managing editor, as, bare-handed (!!), he goes “into the hive” with Parisse. Note: Turn up the volume on your speakers to hear dialogue at the beginning.)

Watch as, at approximately 1:30, Parisse taps 30 bees onto his bare hand. And, at about 2:50, a special appearance by the queen bee herself!

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Lexi Parisse, Fashion Design ’09, who owns her own green fiber business, can also be glimpsed, standing at a safe remove.

And here’s a mesmerizing closeup video of Nick’s bees. The queen has a yellow dot painted on her back.

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These bees are amazing creatures, but Hue will probably wait in the car next time.