Tag Archives: Sustainability

WHERE DOES FIT’S TRASH GO?

As part of Hue staff writer Jonathan Vatner’s Spring 2014 feature, “Where Does FIT’s Trash Go?”, he led three site visits to recycling facilities in the New York City area. Watch short videos of two of the field trips here.

Pratt Industries paper recycling plant, Staten Island. Video by Suzanne Baer, FIT Technology Development Team

Sims material recovery facility, Brooklyn. Video by Jonathan Vatner

SUSTAINABILITY COMES TO FIT’S LIBRARY

Visitors to the Gladys Marcus Library this fall will see a new patch of greenery where file cabinets once stood:

The Sustainability Council's new exhibition wall in FIT's library.

The Sustainability Council’s new exhibition wall in FIT’s library.

The inaugural displays are twofold. First, a selection of photos from one of FIT’s green roofs by a student in Photography professor Keith Ellenbogen’s class. Hue loves the close-up of the Sedum plant — it’s simply succulent!

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Photos of FIT’s green roofs from Assistant Professor Keith Ellenbogen’s class.

The right half of the wall is home to something near and dear to Hue’s heart: the sustainability poster, “Where Does FIT’s Trash Go?” that ran in the Spring 2014 issue of Hue, plus seven posters that will be placed around campus in September, just in time for the college’s first No Impact Week.

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Sustainability posters supported by President Joyce F. Brown and the Sustainability Council.

These posters will guide our community not only in how to dispose of different kinds of waste but also what happens to it after we throw these things away. Hue fervently hopes the information encourages more thought, both about what we throw away and where we toss it.

DJ SPOOKY HAS DONE EVERYTHING EXCEPT TAKE A VACATION

Hue is ambivalent about the concept of a “renaissance man,” not least because women need not apply. But OK, maybe just this once.

Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid, who guested at FIT’s Sustainable Business and Design Conference this spring, has done a lot that most deejays have not. He is the executive editor of Origin Magazine, an “art and conscious lifestyle” magazine. He composed the score for Downloaded, a documentary about Napster that VH1 is releasing later this year. He served as artist in residence at the Metropolitan Museum, creating compositions based on exhibitions. He released a popular iPad app for deejaying. And he’s got a social conscience: After a trip to Antarctica, he wrote The Book of Ice, “part fictional manifesto, part history, and part science book” about climate change.

The cover of “The Book of Ice.”

Along with that came Of Water and Ice, an atmospheric, brooding symphony based on charts of troubling weather and temperature patterns. The music veritably brims with urgency.

Hue only wonders one thing: When does he sleep?

Paul D. Miller in Antarctica. Photo by Maria Thi Mai.

DJ Spooky

BALI + BAMBOO = BEIGE BEAUTY

While vacationing in Bali, Professor Joan Melnick, Interior Design ’61, spent a day in a bamboo wonderland. She was inspired to visit after watching a Ted Talk.

Almost everything in the Green School and adjacent Green Village are made out of bamboo. Because bamboo takes just four years to mature, harvesting it doesn’t cause deforestation. The school’s founder, John Hardy, helped set up bamboo farms where the village now gets its wood.

A bamboo house

Swiss Family Robinson goes green: The Green Village in Bali. All photos courtesy of the Green Village and Ibuku.

The school offers its mostly international students a natural, holistic education. Instead of spending the whole day at a desk, students explore their surroundings and help create their own experiential curricula.

The Green Village, created by Hardy’s daughter Elora, allows for a community of residents by the school.

A villa at night

A villa at night.

The architecture is marvelous. All the structures fit together without nails, and the entire village is powered by a nearby river. “The light and shapes are beautifully undulated,” Melnick says.

A center column of bamboo with a concrete base provides strength for the multilevel structures.

Bamboo column

The foundation for the buildings starts with a column of bamboo.

Instead of blueprints, the architects create 3D models.

3D model

A “blueprint” for a bamboo villa.

“The Balinese are considered incredible craftsmen,” Melnick says. “That’s something we’ve lost in Western culture.”

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Working on a bamboo roof. Building is mostly done by hand.

As of now, three homes have been built. Visitors can rent them short-term or long-term. The interiors are, of course, stunning.

Green Village living room

That’s some serious cross-ventilation.

It’s paradise. And if we see more sustainable developments like this, maybe this paradise will last for future generations.