Tag Archives: Illustration

TATTOO ARTISTS IN MOTION, PART ONE: VICTOR MODAFFERI

Hue’s fall 2013 issue profiled five FIT alumni who have become some of the most successful tattoo artists in New York City. In addition to being interviewed and getting photographed, each one offered a brief tattooing lesson on video. We’ll be posting one a week for the next five weeks.

First up is Victor Modafferi, Illustration ’94, who shows viewers his tattooing setup.

Modafferi tattoos exclusively in black and gray, which allows for subtle shading. An artist working in color would have a different set of ink caps.

Enjoy! — and let us know what you think.

A FINAL TIP OF THE HAT TO ELAINE STONE

The audience in the Katie Murphy Amphitheatre was a sea of hats on December 4, when the FIT community gathered to pay tribute to Elaine Stone, professor emerita of Fashion Merchandising Management and one of the college’s true icons.

“She was an old-school retailer,” Christine Helm, coordinator of the Enterprise Center, remembered. Helm worked under Stone since the late ’80s and considered her a mentor and friend. “She was very much a career girl from Queens who knew her industry and was serious about teaching. She had a real presence. It was fun knowing her.”

Stone wore a hat every day—usually something flamboyant. “Everybody had a story of when they saw her without a hat on,” Helm said. “What people don’t know is that she had a very small head. All those hats were stuffed with plastic to keep them on.”

Attendees of the memorial were encouraged to wear hats, and Melanie Reim, chair of the Illustration MFA department, sketched a few of her favorites. Hue thinks her drawings speak for themselves.

Ten people spoke at the event, including President Joyce F. Brown; Peter Scotese, chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees, and Robin Sackin, chair of Fashion Merchandising Management.

As for Helm, she barely said anything, instead showing a video of Stone. “Elaine always did the talking.”

In the spirit of letting Stone speak for herself, check out this compilation of video clips of her. Jump to about 7:25 to see the professor at her cleverest.

FIT ILLUSTRATORS REFLECT ON JOHN F. KENNEDY AND MARTIN LUTHER KING

A new show at The Museum at FIT puts a collection of dreams on display. Inspired by two 50-year anniversaries—the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the delivery of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech both took place in 1963—the exhibition features stark images, some hopeful, some less so, by students and faculty from the college’s MFA program in Illustration.

Entitled Dreams Lived/Dreams Shattered: MLK, JFK 50 Years Later, the show includes works that range in media from scratchboard and canvas to pen and ink, clay sculpture, and digital print.

“I like bringing the culture of our times to our work,” said Melanie Reim, chair and associate professor of the program. “It’s important to remember that visual interpretations are potent, powerful ways of assigning a feeling to the written word, and in today’s world the illustrator is more powerful than ever with the combination of media they have at their disposal.”

In order to deepen the students’ understanding of these two seminal events in America’s history, Daniel Levinson Wilk, associate professor, American History, provided background, and Matthew Petrunia, associate professor, English and Speech, followed with the key aspects of great speeches. The students were then asked to interpret the events of half a century ago in any way they chose.

“Islands,” by Bruno Nadalin

Bruno Nadalin used the metaphor of Hurricane Katrina and the rooftops of New Orleans to represent the “lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity” that Dr. King spoke of in his “I Have a Dream” speech.

Maria Carlucco’s “Marching for Freedom,” above, is also featured in the exhibition.

The show runs until December 7.

THE AMAZING BIL DONOVAN ’78 DRAWS THE AMAZING RALPH RUCCI ’80. UTTER FABULOUSITY ENSUES

There are times in Hue’s life when we are simply overwhelmed by gorgeocity.

This is one of those times.

For Fashion Week, New York magazine asked illustrator Bil Donovan, Fashion Illustration ’78 to sketch some of the shows in traditional pen and ink. They posted the results here.

At the show by Ralph Rucci, Fashion Design ’80, Donovan had his eye on Rucci’s sister, Rosina. Her ecstatic flourish at the end of every Rucci show is designed to inspire the audience. Donovan’s piece captures the siblings at the most dramatic moment:

“Rucci Bow” by Bil Donovan.

Upon seeing the whole collection of drawings, we cried, “Genius!”

Donovan replied: “Don’t know about the genius part but it was so in the moment… And my dread was to have some accident with the ink on my lap, especially at Thom Browne.”

“Thom Browne Hair and Makeup” by Bil Donovan.

See the rest of Donovan’s works for Fashion Week here.

SUCCESSFUL ROMANCE NOVEL COVER ILLUSTRATOR’S LIFE AFTER THE DEATH OF THE ROMANCE NOVEL COVER

For more than 20 years, Leslie Peck, Illustration ’87, painted the covers of romance novels, bodice ripper and genteel love story alike. Although the contents may have been tawdry (Hue wouldn’t know), the covers were often masterful. Take a look at some of those covers in Hue’s summer issue.

But they didn’t come cheap, and, as publishing houses looked to cut their spending, these lush paintings went by the wayside. Peck, looking for a new career, turned to painting the world around her: farm animals, still lifes, potraits. Hue thinks she gets them just right.

See more painted beauties on Leslie Peck’s website.