Tag Archives: Illustration

ART AND DESIGN STUDENTS DID IT AGAIN (AND BY “IT” WE MEAN CREATE AWESOME WORK)

It’s mid-July, and FIT is (relatively) quiet. But Hue can’t forget that just two months ago, a stunning array of graduating student artwork from the School of Art and Design festooned FIT’s corridors and gallery spaces.

Enjoy some of our favorites in this slide show!

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GRAPHIC MEMOIRIST EATS, WRITES, DRAWS (AND EATS SOME MORE)

“Comics gift the written word with color and line and bless the drawn image with narrative,” graphic memoirist Lucy Knisley rhapsodized, when she spoke at FIT in late March, sponsored by FIT Words, the Culinary Arts Club, and the English and Speech Department.

Lucy Knisley

Lucy Knisley, plotting something.

Knisley gave an annotated reading of her graphic-memoir-cum-cookbook, Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, which came out in 2013 but is still being translated into more languages. The story follows her foodie family (her mother is a chef), with family recipes interspersed. The drawings, Knisley noted, make the recipes much easier to follow.

“Comics are a nice balance between learning to cook from a cookbook and learning to cook from someone,” she explained.

The cover of Relish: My Life in the Kitchen

The cover of Relish: My Life in the Kitchen.

The Culinary Arts Club whipped up a few recipes from the book—including chocolate chip cookies and a delicious spaghetti carbonara—and served them to guests. At this moment, for some reason, Hue began to like Knisley very much.

Hue asked her if it was tricky, writing about and drawing real people in her work. She responded that she follows a few basic rules. “I never use comics as a weapon. I usually ask permission. And I always draw them as attractive as possible.”

Knisley's illustrated recipe for Huevos Rancheros, from her book, Relish.

Knisley’s illustrated recipe for Huevos Rancheros, from her book, Relish.

TATTOO ARTISTS IN MOTION, PART THREE: MAGIE SERPICA

Magie Serpica, Illustration ’07, is co-owner of Milk and Honey Tattoo on Castleton Avenue in Staten Island, NY. Here she explains how cover-ups are done.

When tattoos get old, they begin to fade and warp, or they no longer represent a person’s values. Serpica applies a new, bolder tattoo atop the old one, so that you’d have to look really closely to see evidence of earlier work.

This is part three of Hue’s video series on alumni tattoo artists. Don’t forget to watch parts one about Victor Modafferi of Bullseye Tattoo and part two about Johann Florendo of Mean Street Tattoo!