Tag Archives: FIT Students

PACKAGING DESIGN STUDENTS CELEBRATE GREEN GABLES

Who knew that the most eco-friendly container for milk and juice is almost a century old? That’s right, the humble cardboard gable-top carton, patented in 1915, delivers freshness with minimal strain on the environment. The cartons create very little waste and can be recycled.

Through January 30, Project Carton, an exhibit about this sturdy standby, including faux refrigerator cases stocked full of student-designed cartons, brightens up the Fred P. Pomerantz Art and Design Center lobby.

FIT’s “supermarket,” chock full of cartons created by Packaging Design students. Photos by Smiljana Peros.

Evergreen Packaging, producer of paperboard containers, sponsored the exhibition, along with an FIT student contest to design cartons for “Pure No Pulp Calcium Enriched Orange Juice,” “Good Grazes Skim Plus Milk,” “Frontier Farms Almond Milk,” and “All Natural Pure Granulated Sugar.” Judges from Walmart and Coca-Cola, among other companies, picked the winners, which are displayed on the contest website.

Packaging Design students created the cartons, and representatives from the Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design Department crafted an environment reminiscent of a high-end supermarket, plus an immersive interpretive pathway at the edge of the room. Hue hopes to see more environmentally friendly packaging from the Sustainable Packaging Design credit certificate, which launched last fall.

The back view of the supermarket display case.

Hue enjoyed all the entries, though the winning milk carton stood out as unique and particularly enticing. We generally prefer not to stare at the cow when drinking the milk, but Jennifer Ahern’s whimsical contour drawing makes us excited to down our calcium.

The interpretive walkway, featuring a blown-up version of the winning milk carton.

HOLIDAY “MAGRITTE-INGS” FROM FIT! (OR, THINGS JUST GOT WEIRD)

The holiday season came early this year at FIT: This week, a Surrealism-themed pop-up shop, “Holiday Bizarre,” touched down in the Pomerantz Center lobby, featuring designer fashions selected from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Thrift Shop—“the Bergdorf of thrift stores,” according to Anne Kong, Display and Exhibit Design ’77, assistant professor of Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design. The shop is open from 12 to 8 through Saturday, November 23, and all profits go to cancer research, education, and patient outreach.

“Thrift store shopping is not just a trend,” Kong said. “With Beacon’s Closet, Housing Works, and Buffalo Exchange, it has become a new channel of retail experience.”

The storefront of “Holiday Bizarre,” created by students in the Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design Department. The Merchandising Society is staffing the shop.

The space didn’t pop up out of nowhere. Earlier this year, the MSK Thrift Shop worked with two VPED classes, led by Kong and Adjunct Assistant Professor Mary Costantini, to invent and execute a retail concept to bring secondhand fashion to FIT. One of the classes, on “point of sale,” teaches pop-up shops; the other involves building installations for visual merchandising.

There was no shortage of fun proposals: a gingerbread house, an antique circus, an homage to Bryant Park holiday shops, everything purple, and more. But the Surrealism idea won out for a few reasons. First, it reflected the artistic bent of the School of Art and Design. Second, it didn’t hew to any particular religion. Third, it coincided with an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art about René Magritte. Fourth, it had a killer name.

“Originally it didn’t have the name, and I said it needed one,” Kong remembered. “When the students came back with ‘Holiday Bizarre,’ everything changed.”

Shopping at the “Holiday Bizarre” is totally surreal.

The students had three weeks and $4,000 to build it. They crafted a storefront to look like picture frames and made eyeball ornaments out of beach balls. The details are all there, too: hand-printed hang tags, customized shopping bags, a Magritte shower curtain for the changing room, and other surprises.

They also worked with the thrift shop to curate the merchandise for the FIT community. (Net-A-Porter also donated new and slightly damaged pieces.) Considering a pair of Louboutins already went for $550, Hue thinks they got it right.

Update: The final sales tally after five days was a whopping $35,000. Bravo to all involved!

A TASTE OF MOVIE MAGIC

Hue finds the work of Computer Animation and Interactive Media students utterly delightful. Working mostly alone, they create films of the quality you’d expect in a movie theater. Sean Peterson, CAIM ’13, is no exception. Poppet: No Strings Attached is a gorgeous, amusing piece about a magician, thwarted in his conjurings by his rascally kitty. The animation is so precise, Hue could watch the magician squash and stretch for hours.

Impractical Magic: “Poppet” by Sean Peterson, Computer Animation and Interactive Media ’13.

Long interested in classic Disney cartoons, Peterson got the idea for Poppet after seeing Paperman, the Oscar-winning hand-drawn short that opened for Wreck-It Ralph in 2012. He created 3-D animation set against a still background, augmenting hand-drawn figures with automated techniques to save time. Then he meticulously worked in details like the rim lighting, 1920s-era static, and filmed smoke and dust, using more than 15 layers in the final project.

Peterson hopes to find work in character animation in Hollywood. Based on Poppet, Hue is confident he’ll make a splash—complete with a pool-emptying animated geyser, no doubt.

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MORE STUPENDOUS WORK BY FIT STUDENTS

A public service announcement from Hue: Anyone who hasn’t seen the Art & Design Graduating Student Exhibition is missing out.

But if you are missing it, or if you did miss it (it closes May 23), then here is your consolation prize: more photos of the fabulous work by the (equally fabulous) Smiljana Peros.

In Packaging Design, in the lobby of The Museum at FIT:

Skin care product packaging by Kathleen Gamboa, Packaging Design ’13. The triangular boxes have major shelf appeal.

In Illustration, in the downstairs gallery at The Museum at FIT:

“Queen Elizabeth as the Cat and the Fiddle,” an oil painting by Sunna Yim, Illustration ’13. So lifelike, one could almost believe that man-dog is real!

Another luscious illustration with phenomenal detail:

“Solitary Woman,” an oil painting by Alyssa Bauer, Illustration ’13.

The floor plans by the Interior Design BFA students were hard to capture in a photo, so here’s a design by an AAS Interior Design student.

“Bird House — Inspiration: Ridley Scott,” a mixed media project by Esther Bang, Interior Design.

Last but not least, the Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design group project is an exhibition about the superhero, entitled “Heroes and Villains,” in the Pomerantz lobby. It’s a lot of fun, especially for youngins and comic-book geeks, but also for anyone who enjoys superhero movies and innovative exhibitions.

A jester in the Heroes & Villains exhibition in the Pomerantz lobby, created by the Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design graduating students.

ALL THE SCHOOL’S A STAGE

FIT is in bloom this month — and we’re not talking boring old flowers.

Through May 23, the culminating work of 800 graduating Art and Design students is displayed all throughout the school; for example, Accessories Design and Photography in the Feldman lobby, more Photography in the library, Fine Arts in the Great Hall, Packaging and Fashion Design in the museum lobby, and, oh gosh, just take a gander at this chart.

Hue will post a few more times about the exhibition before its end; for today, here’s a sampling of stunners.

“Transience,” fantastically fluorescent shoes by Rachel Bohn, Accessories Design.

“Ode to Southern Summer,” a necklace by Daniell Hudson, Jewelry Design, made with real cicadas, just in time for the Jurassic Park rerelease this summer. Oh, and the cicada “swarmageddon.”

Spectacle in the Fine Arts exhibition hall. The green resin clutter of body parts is “Ouch,” by Dimitri Dimizas, Fine Arts, a commentary on our culture’s lust for violence.

The “Sammy” plush toy and the “Sammy Can’t Stand Her Bangs” book. Is it a response to Michelle Obama’s look at the inauguration this year?