Monthly Archives: March 2015

A GALLERY SHOW AS DIVERSE AS FIT’S FACULTY

FIT’s gallery spaces and corridors are often filled with award-winning shows at The Museum at FIT as well as impressive student work, but the college’s world-class faculty traditionally show their own work in other venues.

Not so this month! From March 7 to 22, the School of Art and Design presents the second annual New Views: FIT Art and Design Faculty Exhibition, a juried show featuring more than 90 works, in the John E. Reeves Great Hall.

Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the exhibition is its eclecticism. Nontraditional artworks such as a maquette for a proposed Nelson Mandela memorial by Johannes Knoops, assistant professor of Interior Design, and a kickin’ pair of boots by Vasilios Christofilakos, assistant professor of Accessories Design, are positioned among traditional paintings, mixed-media pieces, and interactive installations from  a total of 17 different Art and Design programs. It gives visitors a glimpse of FIT’s dazzling scope.

Check out these standout examples from New Views.

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POETRY IS A DISH BEST SERVED LOUD

Every year, thousands of high school students nationwide compete in Poetry Out Loud, a poetry recitation contest. SUNY hosts the regional competition, which is organized by the Brooklyn-based Teachers and Writers Collaborative — and the New York City regional finals were held on February 5 at good old FIT.

Admittedly, Hue went in with modest expectations. How good could high school students be, right?

The answer: MAGNIFICENT.

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Kiki Giannoulas exults in her performance.

Their voices were surprisingly mature, their readings full of emotion. The poetry, selected from an anthology of 800 choices, blossomed under their skilled interpretation. Half the students could have been professional actors. Hue didn’t want these poems to end.

Shanelle Webster won the contest with "Testimonial" by Rita Dove.

Shanelle Webster won the Poetry Out Loud regional contest with “Testimonial” by Rita Dove.

Four judges, poets themselves, judged the performances based on physical presence, voice and articulation, and other criteria. Accuracy was also extremely important — and very few students flubbed a line. If Hue had been judging, all the students would have been winners.

Maggie Capozzoli-Cavota took second place with "Famous" by Naomi Shihab Nye.

Maggie Capozzoli-Cavota took second place with “Famous” by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The judges included three poets: Reginald Harris, Professor Amy Lemmon (left), and Jeanne Marie Beaumont (second from left). Amy Swauger, director of Teachers & Writers Collaborative, also judged.

The judges included three poets: Reginald Harris, Professor Amy Lemmon (left), and Jeanne Marie Beaumont (second from left). Amy Swauger, director of Teachers & Writers Collaborative (third from left), also judged.