JESSICA, MEET CAROL: AN EXAMINATION OF FIT’S MOST POPULAR NAMES


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Ever since FIT’s 2012 Commencement, Hue has been thinking about names. So Hue did what any slightly obsessive personality with statistical leanings would do: make a word cloud out of all the names from the program and see which ones rose to the top.

2012 FIT graduates

Nicole and Jessica seem to be the winners, though Samantha, Alexandra, Lauren, and Stephanie are well represented. (Trust Hue, there are far more men at FIT than the word cloud would suggest.)

Compare these to the Social Security Administration’s list of most popular baby names for 1991, around when many of these gals were born. Nicole is #15, Jessica is #2. The only real surprise is Alexandra, #36 on the SSA’s list, yet prominently represented here.

That got Hue to wondering, how do the names compare with FIT grads from 50 years before?

1962 FIT graduates

Hello, Carol! And Barbara, Susan, and Judith. There doesn’t seem to be much of a link between 1962 and 2012 names… though if you look closely at this one, you can see Stephanie peeking out in the upper left.

One last experiment: Do the names of FIT’s Art and Design grads differ from those from Business and Technology? Does a person’s name have an effect on their choice of career?

2012 Art and Design graduates

2012 Business and Technology graduates

Hmm, not a huge difference. Nicole is the most popular in Art and Design, Jessica in Business and Technology. But Katherine and Sarah seem to be artier names, while Brittany and Alexandra are more businessy. Also, the men’s names are significantly larger in the Art and Design cloud. Note to men: Apply for a business degree.

Alas, with all these names flying around, Hue can’t help feeling left out.

One thought on “JESSICA, MEET CAROL: AN EXAMINATION OF FIT’S MOST POPULAR NAMES

  1. Nancy

    Interesting analysis! (The names of art/design grads vs. business/tech grads.)

    Some studies have found that people are slightly more likely to choose careers that “resemble” their names. That is, Laura is more likely to go into law, Duncan is more likely to become a doctor. etc. It’s called the Name-Letter Effect. It may also influence where you live, who you marry, what brands you buy, etc.

    Reply

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