A GALLERY SHOW AS DIVERSE AS FIT’S FACULTY

FIT’s gallery spaces and corridors are often filled with award-winning shows at The Museum at FIT as well as impressive student work, but the college’s world-class faculty traditionally show their own work in other venues.

Not so this month! From March 7 to 22, the School of Art and Design presents the second annual New Views: FIT Art and Design Faculty Exhibition, a juried show featuring more than 90 works, in the John E. Reeves Great Hall.

Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the exhibition is its eclecticism. Nontraditional artworks such as a maquette for a proposed Nelson Mandela memorial by Johannes Knoops, assistant professor of Interior Design, and a kickin’ pair of boots by Vasilios Christofilakos, assistant professor of Accessories Design, are positioned among traditional paintings, mixed-media pieces, and interactive installations from  a total of 17 different Art and Design programs. It gives visitors a glimpse of FIT’s dazzling scope.

Check out these standout examples from New Views.

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POETRY IS A DISH BEST SERVED LOUD

Every year, thousands of high school students nationwide compete in Poetry Out Loud, a poetry recitation contest. SUNY hosts the regional competition, which is organized by the Brooklyn-based Teachers and Writers Collaborative — and the New York City regional finals were held on February 5 at good old FIT.

Admittedly, Hue went in with modest expectations. How good could high school students be, right?

The answer: MAGNIFICENT.

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Kiki Giannoulas exults in her performance.

Their voices were surprisingly mature, their readings full of emotion. The poetry, selected from an anthology of 800 choices, blossomed under their skilled interpretation. Half the students could have been professional actors. Hue didn’t want these poems to end.

Shanelle Webster won the contest with "Testimonial" by Rita Dove.

Shanelle Webster won the Poetry Out Loud regional contest with “Testimonial” by Rita Dove.

Four judges, poets themselves, judged the performances based on physical presence, voice and articulation, and other criteria. Accuracy was also extremely important — and very few students flubbed a line. If Hue had been judging, all the students would have been winners.

Maggie Capozzoli-Cavota took second place with "Famous" by Naomi Shihab Nye.

Maggie Capozzoli-Cavota took second place with “Famous” by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The judges included three poets: Reginald Harris, Professor Amy Lemmon (left), and Jeanne Marie Beaumont (second from left). Amy Swauger, director of Teachers & Writers Collaborative, also judged.

The judges included three poets: Reginald Harris, Professor Amy Lemmon (left), and Jeanne Marie Beaumont (second from left). Amy Swauger, director of Teachers & Writers Collaborative (third from left), also judged.

 

 

SOME PEOPLE JUST HAVE ALL THE TALENT (AND OTHER THINGS WE’VE LEARNED FROM ADAM EZEGELIAN)

Hue has recently been expending quite a bit of energy trying not to feel jealous of Adam Ezegelian, a Toy Design student who is making American Idol a must-watch this season.

Adam Ezegelian does FIT proud.

Our hometown hero: Adam Ezegelian does FIT proud.

In his audition, before launching into a freewheeling, revved-up rendition of “Born to Be Wild,” Ezegelian showed off a few spectacular caricatures he’d drawn of the judges.

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Next came Hollywood Week, and he sang a version of “Demons” by Imagine Dragons. It’s hard to tell what J.Lo’s grimace meant, but they seemed happy with his performance.

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And on group day, singing “Pretty Young Thing,” he killed it with buoyant, driving energy, nabbing himself a spot in the competition proper. Not only that, while the other contestants quaked in their boots, he seemed to be having a rollicking good time.

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We can’t wait to see what vocal pleasures Ezegelian will bring to our televisions in the coming weeks!

HAPPIEST HOLIDAYS FROM HUE!

Hue heartily hopes that you find a way to relax, recharge, and renew in these final days of 2014.

Best wishes for success and happiness in 2015!

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FOUR THINGS WE DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT GAY HISTORY

Jack Drescher, MD.

Jack Drescher, MD.

Jack Drescher, MD, one of the world’s experts on the psychology of gay men, lectured at FIT last week about the history of psychiatric views on homosexuality. (He was invited by Daniel Levinson Wilk, Associate Professor of American History. )

Turns out Hue didn’t know nearly as much as we thought we did. For example:

1. Pioneering psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud considered homosexuality to be a result of “developmental arrest,” and nigh impossible to treat, but he didn’t judge it as perversion. Only later did psychiatrists pass judgment on it.

2. At the American Psychiatric Association convention In 1972, Dr. John Fryer spoke to the membership about his life as a gay psychiatrist. At that time, a psychiatrist could lose his or her license for being gay, so to conceal his identity, he spoke through a microphone that distorted his voice, and he wore an oversized suit and mask. Creepy!

A landmark 1972 panel on the question of whether homosexuality is mental illness, featuring a moving speech by Dr. John Fryer, right.

A landmark 1972 panel on the question of whether homosexuality is mental illness, featuring a moving speech by Dr. John Fryer in disguise, right.

3. When the APA voted in 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM (the official list of mental disorders), it was the first and only time the membership has voted on a scientific matter.

4. Conversion therapy, the effort to change the sexuality of gay people, is now illegal in some places because it is considered consumer fraud. In other words, any claim that it can be “successful” is false.

Hue plans on reading Drescher’s book, Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Gay Man, to learn more.