Posts tagged: social media

Are you still the sucker you used to be?

By , December 14, 2013 8:46 am

New research was just released that demonstrates a big shift in how consumers buy and what influences their purchase. Traditional ads no longer have the same power to shape consumer opinions as they once did. Amazon (the ultimate cost and quality comparison, along with others) influence consumers more than ever.  The studies were based on the “compromise” effect – (see NYT article below for the full story) are probably now saying to yourself, ho hum… and why is this news?  Well, it took a while for the establishment to document what most of us already know and practice organically.  However, some of the results of the study suggest that digital feedback in the digital world allows marketers to see what works and what doesn’t – what messages are influencing customers and which ones aren’t.  And they can make adjustments accordingly…and very quickly.  This is all very well and good, and excellent support (although the writers and researchers don’t see it from the customers’ point-of-view, so they are still missing the point) for my position that customer-focused information and insight right from the beginning…pre- advertising/marketing/PR efforts and spending, is more valuable than measuring what works after you’ve spent all that time, money and effort and then correcting it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/08/business/theres-power-in-all-those-user-reviews.html?smid=pl-share

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

EduTech Day: Building for the Future

By , November 12, 2013 8:58 am

Fifth Annual EduTech Day at FIT
Thursday, November 14th
9am-4pm
The Great Hall & John E. Reeve’s Conference Center
Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, NY

Edu Tech Day 2013 flyer

The day will include presentations, panels, workshops, luncheon and book signing by Jason Miles – bestselling author and expert in Pinterest and Instgram!

The Technology Development Team (TDT) in collaboration with The Center for Excellence in Teaching will be holding the fifth annual EduTech Day on Thursday, November 14, 2013. Our theme “Building for the Future” focuses on how we can integrate technology and pedagogy in response to the increasingly complex and diverse environments faculty will encounter academically and students will encounter professionally. This year’s theme is in part responsive to the college’s plan of strengthening the academic core, which will be reinforced while keeping an eye on emerging trends in the professional world. Among our goals are to foster student-centeredness within the FIT community by focusing on collaborative activities. The event will provide hands-on experience linking best practices in education and in professions with current and emerging trends in technology.

EDITORIAL AND PRESS RELEASE – P.R. influence through $$

By , October 31, 2013 10:06 am

Brandpsych logo

PRESS RELEASES BY PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEES lead to content that functions like press releases but are paid-for in so-called NATIVE ADVERTISING. Here are some vital questions to consider:
Is a brand’s PR’s use of mobile media a sign of authenticity?
Will media have explicit editorial surveillance for a press release content that is paid for?
Will editorial content now be dominated by press releases in omni-media and omnicon?

Also, if Native Advertising consists of paid-for deals made between PR committees and a variety of media, how will reward advertising affect authenticity? Will the significant audience care – as long as they are rewarded? (see our July 2013 blog on Native Advertising.) (reward-based advertising rewards consumers for interacting with branded-content in their favorite mobile apps.)

Considering these new forms of PR content, what will editorial content become? Will it lead to an erosion of inconvenient factual positioning found in Brand Marketing Communications?
Will the PR factions of Brand Management actually create “contracts” between Brands and Media? Will the media be receptive to this idea as it changes the role of gatekeeper — to what exactly?

drawing by Art Winters

drawing by Art Winters

Now that we have omni-tweets and facebook updates and e-mail blasts, what will the consumer believe is the real story of the brand’s positioning, its image and meaning? A significant answer to this question is in the changes in marketing communications. We now have so many more methods of messaging and outlets for those messages: e-books, infographics; blogs, social media, email newsletters, webinars, … , not to mention, the traditional media that still exist.

These can be effective especially when they are a creative part of a brand’s PR and marketing campaign strategy. News outlets still need connections with the people and stories behind the brand.

The press release that was, is still useful. However, it is so much changed. What is needed now is relevant content that truly involves the receiver. The receivers of press releases used to be the media gatekeepers – reporters and editors… but this has changed due to the advent of social and mobile media, company websites and blogs. And a serious reality in this new age of PR is that the receivers of press releases are now almost any audience … and the harsh reality that content providers must face is that their press release content might never be read!

The evolution in information exchanges now requires a whole new
Brand Think!!

What do you think???

 

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

Fashion Tech Event

By , August 17, 2013 10:26 am

If fashion tech interests you, or you are a fashion tech person, then this event is well worth attending.
http://fashiontech-ny.eventbrite.com/?utm_source=Copy+of+Copy+of+Copy+of+Events+June%2FJuly+2013&utm_campaign=MAY+2012&utm_medium=email

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Developing Your Personal Brand

By , July 29, 2013 11:54 am

FIT Students are ambitious, energetic pacesetters who pursue careers in design, fashion, art, communications, and business. No matter what your career, developing a personal brand will allow you to differentiate yourself in the market, whether you want to design a new shoe line or become a movie producer.

We found a great article, Personal Branding 101, by Lisa Quast at Forbes.  A quick summary of the six specific tips follows, but the full piece is worth the read so check it out:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaquast/2013/04/22/personal-branding-101/

Step 1: Define your aspirations. Be specific about your goals and objectives. FIT students need to set clear goals that relate to their interests, such starting their own jewelry line.

Step 2: Conduct research. What can you learn from what others are doing? There is a lot of competition in the fashion and related industries, so learn more about your competition.

Step 3: Determine your brand attributes. What adjectives do you want people to associate with you and why?

Step 4: Assess your current state. How large is the gap between the current you and the person you want others to perceive you? For FIT students, this may mean that you are a hobbyist with tremendous talent who wants to be seen as a serious designer.

Step 5: Create your game plan. Your game plan needs to include all aspects of yourself as a product. Your specific media strategy counts, but so does but how you present yourself in person.

Step 6: Manage your brand. Proactively manage all aspects of your brand and make sure everything works together to reinforce your attributes and market niche.

This article definitely offers a lot of great ideas for both established and developing professionals.

NATIVE ADVERTISING… a new definition, or will it lead to consumer deafinition?

By , July 25, 2013 11:14 am

Brandpsych logo

It may be the time to ask whether this new definition is helpful — NATIVE ADVERTISING is a method of communication that is “native” to the experience offered within a website’s content, valuable content integrated within the editorial feed — not an ad-in-a-box alongside the search page.

Actually, we have already used descriptions of Native Advertising such as advertorial, brand reference, and sponsored content, among others.  Thus, Native could be defined as any ad that is blended within content.  Also from a consumer’s view, it may be an opt-in interactive choice in which she or he is aware of the advertiser’s message intent, and still opts-in.  Different age groups react to marketing online in more or less accepting/receptive ways.  Therefore, a Native Advertiser needs to communicate how its offer has personal appeal and feels native to the site, overcoming the consumer’s wish not to hear or see advertising messages.

Up to this era of constant change and 24/7 communications, the advertiser and the media had agreed that the blending of advertising and editorial was not allowed. There was a wall between the two because it was considered confusing to the consumer.  It might be suggested that the media’s main interest was in making money through advertising, even more than in providing useful information and entertaining experiences.  However, many of the media are in a new world of needing to find new revenue streams.

At this time, an argument is occurring about what the term Native Advertising really describes.  And if it also means advertising that will not be received as advertising.  On the other hand, it may prove to be perceived as better than the newer omni-channel forms of advertising that surely are on the way.

Some practitioners will contend that in this new “social media world,” many consumers don’t perceive any difference between editorial and advertising.  They regard it all as content in their communication.com lives.  Behind the strategist’s attempt to create appeals by linking content to a consumer’s wants and/or needs is still the positive positioning of a brand.  Whatever method used, increased brand relationship + loyalty = improved brand equity, which is the goal.

It is important to note that consumers are now more informed, aware, and selective.  So we ask: Is it wise to use “Native” in our advertising and communications?  Will it be a strategy to increase trust or mistrust?  Will it be constructive or obstructive?  Will marketers get better results, publishers get a premium revenue stream, and audiences get a better experience?

Will Native Advertising be the new strategic direction or just one more arrow in our ad quiver?

Native Advertising Mad Avenue

“I feel that Native Advertising may turn out to be the Mad Avenue to be on…” Drapered by Art Winters

 

For more on Native Advertising:

Adyoulike.com; Nativo.net; AdsNative.com

sharethrough.com

 

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

The New Role of Market Research

By , June 29, 2013 8:31 am
Today’s guest blogger is Dev Das, Founder of Expleo Insight, a consulting and market research company specializing in emerging biotech and pharma (see bio below).  Dev has several years of experience in big pharma as well as running his own business so he understands the challenges and needs on both sides of the market research equation.
 
Trying to compete in an increasingly competitive market with fewer resources?  It’s become the name of the game these days for most companies, both large and small.  Startup companies have always been resource constrained due to tight budgets. Now, with a glut of choices and minimal differentiation, mid and larger sized companies are also feeling the pinch.  
 
And as large companies, as well, struggle to keep growing profitably, there is an urgent need for more operating efficiencies.  Success now lies in being more flexible, agile and efficient than others.
 
The rapid advances in technology and telecommunications have provided a plethora of options to tap into as companies grapple with growth and differentiation.  They have also created the need for a new type of market researcher.  This new strategic market researcher can no longer solely rely on methods from the past.  They will need to be open to piloting and experimenting with new approaches, and with how to channel the flood of new data and technology into actionable strategic insights.  
 
A big challenge and opportunity lies ahead of us as market researchers … 
can we harness the power of our new options in crowdsourcing, mobile technology, social media and big data spaces, to provide the insights we seek WITHOUT being inundated with more data dumps and analysis paralysis, or in plain English, too much information with only a small percentage being useful.
 
 
Dev Das has a  20+ year career which has spanned the biotech, pharmaceutical, and consumer packaged goods industries.   Immediately prior to creating Expleo Insight, Dev built the Strategic Insights & Analytics function in Auxilium Pharmaceuticals.  As Group Director, he successfully managed the market research, analytics/forecasting, and competitive intelligence needs for the company portfolio.  Prior to Auxilium, Dev led the market research efforts for several early and late-stage opportunities within Virology, Immunology, and Cardiovascular/Metabolics areas at Bristol-Myers Squibb.  Dev started his career in the Consumer Packaged Goods industry with market leaders, Procter & Gamble and Kraft Foods, which gave him a solid foundation of the underlying principles of effective marketing.
 
Dev’s educational background includes a BS from the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai and an MBA from the Case Western Reserve University.  He is currently pursuing a doctorate at the Pace University.
 

From MADMEN to MADMOBILE The Next Era of Advertising and Promotion

By , June 27, 2013 9:58 am

Brandpsych logo

Advertising and Promotion (AdPromo) is now developing a new I.D. for marketing communications, which we could call MADMOBILE. This is recognition of the blending of Social Media, Global Technologies, and 2-way mobile communications. Much has been discussed about what advertising and promotion will get to be. Mobile advertiser/customer engagement and exchange in social media is the big think in AdPromo’s quickly changing present and exciting future.

The thinking behind some new innovations is to provide “glocal–(Global Localities) –with—mobile” opportunities for local AdPromo. Those on the forefront for developing these new services are employing their knowledge of changes in consumer behavior, which is being caused by, and satisfied by, the ever-expanding presence of Smartphones and social media.

These give the advertiser and promoter the opportunity for the delivery of local marketing communications. In the past, and still in the present, big business with its big money has used AdPromo to knock out small business. Many small-businesses can now make the most of the opportunity to advertise and promote to specific local targets through mobile “MadPhones” with a smaller, more effective and efficient budget.

In addition, there are recent connectivity innovations that enable customers to learn of a promotion without being in or even near a store, along with advances in Near Field Communications (NFC), receiving contact when they are passing near the brick and mortar store. More and more, retailers are encouraging word-of-mouth referrals by loyal customers, which is helping to build their loyalty through interesting engagements and an active relationship.

For now, customers are able to find advertising and promotions on their phones and tablets. Most importantly, a store can launch its advertising for a promotion in a few minutes, designing the message for today’s deals and targeting a specifically valued customer. The opportunity for retailers to present promotions in real time is a salient feature of the New World of MADMOBILE.

MadMobile drawing by Art Winters

drawing by Art Winters

 

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

10 Trends for Better Marketing and Results in 2013

By , March 23, 2013 10:08 am

Everyone loves top 10 lists.

So now that we’re ending the first quarter of the year…here’s some helpful directions to focus on in your marketing and business (they are in no particular order of importance)

1.       Integrate your marketing
As much as everyone would really love “the answer” and that it be just one thing…social media is the “one” at the moment…that’s just not how marketing works. Marketing is an eco-system that includes social, PR, collateral, branding etc.

2.       Put in a call to action in every piece of marketing you do
This may sound self-serving but it actually helps direct the customer to the key next steps in order to buy your product or otherwise engage with you.

3.       Create content that is valuable to your customers
This includes helpful tips and case histories that will help move the prospective forward to become a customer.

4.       Communicate
Tweet, blog, get your voice out there and heard.  I posted a jobs graph from another source a while back and suddenly it’s been “Pinned” by dozens of people on Pinterest. Who knew?

5.       Do primary research with your customers
Ask them open-ended questions about what’s important to them about your product or service and what will drive them to buy it.

6.       Listen to your customers’ answers
The information may be different from what you expected. Welcome the face that you do not know it all and keep your ego out of it.

7.       Follow-up after the sale
Thank your customers. If they have feedback (which you should solicit) listen to it and if something is wrong, make changes or otherwise implement their feedback.
Follow-up again.

8.       Identify your influencers
Build a relationship with them either on-line or in person.

9.       Brand yourself, your product, your company
Remember, you are your brand.  Use experiences and stories to help with brand identification. Your customers will also help you create your brand.

10.     Write better subject lines
It’s a crowded, competitive world out there…make sure your communications are opened.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Just say yes…to networking

By , March 2, 2013 9:12 am

A lot of business (particularly service businesses) is done by relationships.  Chemistry is one factor that helps to foster those relationships. Sharing an experience is another. That’s why networking is important.  (Yes online networking is important as well and chemistry and experience sharing occur there also but my focus in this post  is on in-person networking encounters).

Now, don’t just jump up and run to the nearest networking events – there are too many each day. So you have to be selective.

Here are some tips that work for me on events:

  • Select events that interest you – it’s easier to start conversations and ask questions of panels if you’re interested. Also once you’ve asked questions, people are aware of you and may approach you after the panel.
  • Stretch – go to an event that’s geographically different – cross the river –  if you’re in Manhattan, go to Brooklyn or New Jersey. I’ve gone as far as the outer suburbs of Philadelphia.  I was in a networking event in Newark, and had the opportunity to meet Christine Quinn, President of the New York City Council, and chat with her for a  few uninterrupted minutes – I might not have been able to do that in a Manhattan venue (especially in her district) because when she’s local, everyone wants to meet her.  A few months later, I ran into her again at another event and she recognized me – we chatted again and I was connected to her chief of staff for ongoing communication with her. Valuable connection.
  • Use social networking to find out which events are high quality.  Sometimes someone in the know will offer you a discount to the event. Almost always someone will direct you to a good event and maybe even one you hadn’t heard of before.
  • Get to the event early – I often wind up speaking with the guest speaker or panelists prior to the event before anyone knows who they are – after the panel, they are usually surrounded by lots of people.
  • Go no matter how you are feeling – sometimes just walking in the door without any expectations brings nice surprises.
  • Don’t expect to meet everyone.  That results in lots of business cards in the trash later.
  • Networking is not limited to a time and place – I know colleagues that got business by chatting while waiting on a long line at a professional meeting. Here are some other networking ideas http://adminsecret.monster.com/benefits/articles/1211-alternative-places-to-network

In my entrepreneurship classes, I sometimes run into an individual who is shy and says they can’t network. There is one universal answer: “get over it!”   If you are starting a business, the single most important factor in the business is you  — YOU ARE YOUR BRAND.  You must get out there and network because people are buying you.

Here are some more tips on how to make your networking succeed: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-bernard/six-tips-how-to-network_b_1954824.html

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy