Posts tagged: Small Business

Licensing – Signing the deal is just the beginning

By , October 26, 2013 9:24 am

A licensing agreement is like any other legal agreement.  You can’t just sign on the dotted line and fold up the agreement and put it away for safe keeping. Like a relationship, you must nurture all the parties involved.  It’s a living, breathing and highly dynamic bond.  Sure you’ve agreed to amounts, the frequency of payments, milestones, if any, and all the other details.  But, as in life, things happen.  What happens if one party doesn’t reach the milestone?  Or goes bankrupt? What if there are manufacturing or shipping delays?  What if the product composition or the amount of product isn’t exactly what you agreed upon?  And, probably most commonly, what if the personnel change or the license gets shifted from the original department into some other department’s bailiwick? Yes, the license should cover most of these possibilities but sometimes things come up unexpectedly.

This is why, whether you are the licensor or licensee, it’s really important to develop and maintain your relationship with the other party since both fates might depend on it.

The Licensing Executives Society’s upcoming meeting deals with a lot of these issues.  The focus will be on pharma, since that’s the 800-pound gorilla in the region.  However, if you attend, there will be lots of valuable information to gleam. Here’s the link:

http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=2d4d04d50b85ccc79f5b5b933&id=173b67560e&e=

Here are some other examples of what can happen with copyrights, license rights etc.

http://kateharperblog.blogspot.com/2009/08/how-to-protect-your-assets-in-licensing.html

http://www.cracked.com/article_19683_6-terrifying-user-agreements-youve-probably-accepted.html

http://www.hrfmlaw.com/img/articles/The_IP_License_Agreement_A_View_from_5_000_Feet_article_370958.pdf

My parting suggestion:  Start a relationship with an Intellectual Property attorney who you trust.  It’s always important to have a trusted and knowledgeable partner on your side.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Socks, Tights, and More!

By , October 22, 2013 7:00 pm

Meet our new Instructor, Fern Pochtar!

She will be teaching SXF 222 Intro to Legwear Design: Socks, Tights and More,
starting October 29, 2013!

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Hi Fern! So, tell us a little about yourself…

I am a graduate of Pratt Institute and have been a professional in the legwear hosiery industry for many years. After working for several corporations designing and merchandising legwear and other accessory items, in 1983, I started a business with a partner and we are still going strong. I’ve traveled all over the world making socks and hosiery and it has been a very fulfilling career.

For those of us unfamiliar with this market, please inform us…

One of the really great things about this market is that there is always a need for the product. The trends can change from one item to another, but but there is always a need for legwear. The most exciting thing about this category is the fun to blend the technology with the creative. Take the course and learn just how creative you can get!

Tell us about a project or accomplishment that you consider to be the most significant in your career…

Before I started my company, I was the designer at Danskin and made the first cotton tights. These have become a basic and classic for everybody’s wardrobe.
Also, starting my own company, SoloLicensing/Legwatch, Inc., after working for others. I understood the technical part of designing which was a unique quality and I felt that I was well respected in the industry and could build a business, which we did.

What will the students learn from your class?

Students will learn how to understand the technical information that one needs in order to detail and design any legwear item and have product come out exactly as they imagined. They will learn the terminology and all phases of the legwear design process.

Thank you and we look forward to your new class!
To register for this new class, please visit http://www.fitnyc.edu/noncreditregister.

 

Corporate ID

By , October 19, 2013 9:26 am

Part 2: Focus on your Tag line

The tag line, slogan, customer promise, value proposition, etc. is a key part of your corporate identity and brand.  Like your logo, it’s important to get it right the first time so that you start to build and reinforce a story/image about your company. It’s a verbal complement and reinforcement of your logo. And vice versa.

All those phrases I used do not mean the same thing – I’m purposely over simplifying to make a point.  The same characteristics and endpoint should be the goal of that line and that is – it should provide a benefit with a very brief (a few words) phrase as pithy as possible.

Let’s take the value proposition – in short, it’s a promise from the company or the product, to the customer. It delivers a benefit or value to the customer.  Some lines serve to differentiate the company from the competition at the same time.  A really good line will do all of the above and take it even further.  Those lines are rare.  There are many methodologies to develop a tag line.  Again, as in having an intuitive and creative designer for your logo, use a resource who will work with you to develop an equally sustainable tag line.

Here are some memorable taglines — some deliver a perceived benefit that is larger than the actual product:

BMW  -  The Ultimate Driving Machine
DeBeers   -  A Diamond is Forever
American Express   -  Don’t Leave Home Without It
Calvin Klein (fragrance)  -  Between Love and Madness Comes Obsession
Calvin Klein Jeans  -  Nothing Comes Between Me and My Calvin’s
Clarks  -  Shoes Designed for Living
Clarks  -  Shoes Designed to Live in
Levis  -  Original Jeans. Original People

Make your tag line memorable; it’s vital to capturing the image and story of your company, plus the immediate and aspirational benefit of your product/service.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Your corporate identity…get it right the first time

By , October 5, 2013 10:13 am

Part 1: Focus on your logo

Every company should start out with minimal corporate IDs or branding – logo, name, tag line (value proposition), design templates and color palettes. There should be a template developed that shows how these items are used (in larger companies, a brand book is created that spells out exactly how sizes, placements, colors etc. are to be used ).

This is the core of your company’s identity. Like a skeleton, it supports your body.  Do it early, and do it correctly. And especially don’t skimp on the fees to get it done.  It’s a lot more difficult to correct a brand identity mistake or direction than to establish it the first time – to make a correction, you will have to re-ID your company, and then spend countless dollars and time on PR to explain why the company has changed its basic identity and to overcome confusion created by this change.

I’ve seen a lot of results from websites where designers bid for the logo work.  Some of it is okay.  Okay is not good enough for your company.  A lot of the results are derivative of other logos, and leftover designs an artist hasn’t sold. Remember, you are going to pay for the result.  Pay one time and get it right and it won’t cost you dollars and time down the road.

So invest the money into a designer or firm who gets you.

When it’s my money, I look for someone who is intuitive about what my client or my company is and what they are trying to do/say to the marketplace (how do you know they are intuitive?  Check out what they’ve done for other people…you’ll get a feel for if they have a feel for their clients).  My designer is one of my company’s secret weapons to success.

An interesting take on designers is expressed in this link:
http://www.manta.com/TOTD/marketing/20131004?referid=16483&su=MT1000787066&uu=511dac7431f24625b3909f94

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Are You A Design Entrepreneur?

By , September 28, 2013 8:21 am

DENYC logo

The second (annual I hope) Design Entrepreneurs NYC program came to an amazing finale Thursday evening September 26 with the announcement of two winners of cash awards of 1st place- $25,000 and 2nd place- $10,000. Becca McCharen owner of CHROMAT (chromatgarments.com) placed first in the business plan competition and Vasumathi Soundararajan (an FIT grad!) of Ken Wroy, Inc. (kenwroy.com) came in second (there were only two places). Kudos to the winners!

Design Entrepreneur Winners 2013

L to R: Dr. Joyce F. Brown, President, Fashion Institute of Technology; Vasumathi Soundararajan, Ken Wroy, Inc.; Becca McCharen, Chromat; Jeanette Nostra, President, G-III Apparel Group.

And kudos to the entire 2013 class of Design Entrepreneurs NYC! Everyone is on their way to growing their companies with freshly minted business plans in their possession.  The intensive mini-MBA program started in June with solid weekend-filled classes and then the entrepreneurs spent their summer, under the guidance of mentors,  working hard writing and refining their business plans. After submitting their business plans, the entrepreneurs waited to hear which ones were selected to present – half of the class of 35.  The presentations, in front of industry judges in four different rooms, narrowed down the field to 4 finalists who then presented in front of all the judges and the 2013 class.  Some of the Judges included: Tim Baxter (EVP & GMM, Macy’s), Morris Goldfarb (CEO, G-III Apparel), Ellen Rodriguez (President & CEO, French Connection), Jeffrey Binder (Consultant, Former Divisional Merchandise Manager, Bloomingdales), and Laurence Leeds, Jr. (Chair, Buckingham Capital).  I was privileged to be a moderator for one of the panels.

So the entrepreneurs are off now to grow their businesses and take them in new directions as a result of this experience.  As well as stay in touch with their classmates, faculty, school and judges.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Warby Parker talk

By , September 23, 2013 7:58 am

Warby Parker

DIY or hire it out

By , September 14, 2013 9:31 am

Two Sides of the DIY Coin
What every entrepreneur should understand before they Do It Themselves

Side One:  Efficient Use of Your Time
You’re the CEO.  You must figure out the value of your time in general against the value of your time spent against a DIY project.  Is it worth it?
While you are writing the patent and filing it yourself (I know of at least two entrepreneurs that did this, one in fashion, one in tech), six months could easily go by and your business is headless during that time because your energies are focused elsewhere. Can your company really survive without you running it for that length of time?

For more insight on this side of the coin see: http://blog.nyctechconnect.com/2013/08/13/why-am-i-doing-this/

Side Two:  Good Communications Skills

“The only way to get something done right is to do it myself”.  If that’s the way you think, then there’s a problem with the way you are communicating…you aren’t.  Making yourself understood is crucial in business (and every other aspect of your life as well).  Not only with employees and freelancers but with vendors and clients as well. You must be able to make yourself understood to grow your business and to operate it efficiently.  You can’t do everything yourself (I’m sure you’ve seen org charts where every function is “YOU”) or you and your business won’t get very far.

For more insight on this side of the coin see: http://blog.gcsagents.com/2010/10/06/if-you-want-something-done-right-you-can-do-it-yourself-but-if-you-want-a-lot-of-things-done-right-communicate/

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

The Press Release — what works, what doesn’t

By , September 7, 2013 10:15 am

Before a fashion designer (and most start-ups these days) will turn to advertising or other traditional forms of marketing these days, they are most likely to use PR first. Why? Because of the broad reach and cost efficiencies PR is capable of delivering.So for those of you first embarking on a PR campaign, or maybe just starting to send press releases, here’s some do’s and don’t’s.

Don’t – Waste the time of the recipient of the Press Release

Spew of a lot of press releases just to make “noise” – they are not appreciated by editors and will not be read and when you have something that’s really important, guess what?  Straight into the trash.
- Noisy press releases include, so-and-so has just joined the firm as CFO.  If so-and-so isn’t well known, it’s not newsworthy
Meander around and tell a long story with the point, or news nugget, at the very end.
- If I gave an example here, you’d be asleep or gone by the time you hit the third line
Assume the recipient understands your industry’s jargon
- Jargon-type press releases include, The CFO of LIMA is a featured speaker on the USPTO IP panel at FSLV.

Do – Get to the bottom line(s) quickly

Create a catchy, SHORT, newsworthy headline which gives the bottom line in it – like a news story headline.
- LVMH Gives Middle Finger To Hermes, Acquires More Shares Despite Enormous Fine
If you have an existing relationship with an editor, separate their press release from the rest and customize it
- Susan, I think this information will be useful to the article you’re preparing
Make sure to put in quotes from key players in the action – it increases likelihood of the quote and point being picked up
- LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault had this to say about the situation….

For other tips, all necessary to create a powerful press release, and to increase your branding, check out the two links below.

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/15014.aspx?goback=.gde_64854_member_266792579#

http://www.nwcphp.org/communications/news/the-nine-components-of-a-press-release

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Franchising

By , August 31, 2013 8:20 am

Thinking about franchising? Either buying one or starting one?  Check out the stats.


Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.

She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

SHOPPERSONA … CUSTOMER BEHAVIORAL CONDITIONING through DIGITAL MARKETING CONTENT

By , August 29, 2013 9:33 am

Brandpsych logo

Knowing your key customers’ lifestyles and work behaviors can help create content to align your brand shoppersona with your target customer’s shoppersona. In this digital era, to communicate real value, it is necessary to provide meaningful experiences through content that is based on your carefully researched key customer persona. With exploding competition for the customer’s time and attention, brands must become the “go to,” “top-of-mind” brand name for acquiring that special “persona” humans seek. To ring that bell, as Ivan Pavlov’s studies in behavioral conditioning explored, brands must create web content experiences based on knowledge of what will activate the customer‘s want/need to shop and buy. Brands have always sought to learn how they shop and why they buy; now they must go deeper.

Ivan Pavlov by Art Winters

Ivan Pavlov by Art Winters

So what do digital marketers need in order to create their behavioral conditioning strategies? Starting with lifestyle and life work, learning your customers’ online habits: Do they spend a lot of time online? When: While at work? Only when at home? Any time on the go? For What: Are there categories of products they are more or less likely to shop for online? Where do they get relevant brand information; which blogs do they value; how much do they rely on friends and associates for referrals; what media and devices are they using …?

To gain and keep customers, a brand must align its “positioning conditioning,” to establish why the customer should consider changing their brand preference behaviors. Again we ask: How is your brand different and better in terms of what it offers the customer in their managements of life? How do you lead the customer to your touch points and get them to engage with your brand?

If you haven’t been thinking about how digital marketing is changing the behavioral conditioning in customer behavior, it may be time to update your knowledge. Specifically why and how potential customers are now shopping and buying. These insights can be used to create content for the new Native Advertising (see our July 2013 blog) that takes a new approach to how media and brands are communicating what products and services a brand can promise and deliver. Digital marketing strategies should concentrate on interactions rather than transactions. The primary goal is to develop new ways to approach your key customers with content that contains sincere concerns for helping them and developing experiences to build a relationship that is based on knowledge of their new behavioral shoppersona.

For more on Online Shopping Habits of Technology Consumers, go to these very interesting and current survey results: http://www.logicbuy.com/features/survey-online-shopping-habits-of-technology-consumers-infographic

 

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

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