Tag Archives: Creative

etching of musicians

Illustration Interview

Meet our Instructor,  Joan Chiverton!

Joan Chiverton

So, tell us a little about yourself…

I’ve been an artist and illustrator my whole life. Recently I’ve discovered I really enjoy etching, monoprinting and silkscreen printing. I make it a point to sketch wherever I go. I often bring etching plates to concerts and jazz clubs and work directly on them at those venues.

I’m currently represented by The Old Print Shop, where I’m showing a new series of musician etchings this fall.

I’m on the Board of Directors of the Society of Illustrators. I teach at the Fashion Institute of Technology, and Harbor VA Hospital. And I organize a special sketching program at the Bard Graduate Center Gallery. My work has been in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and numerous other publications.

I’ve also worked with numerous ad agencies and corporations as an award-winning art director and designer.

I can’t remember a time I wasn’t painting and drawing. My father, Albert Pels, was a fine artist, my mother, Gertrude Pels was an artist and children’s book writer. I’ve also managed to make time to raise 3 amazing children, Michael, Peter and Julia.

etching of musicians
Etching of musicians


Was there a project or accomplishment that you consider to be significant in your career?

I won Art Director’s Club awards and One Show gold awards as an art director in New York City before becoming creative director at several ad agencies in the Albany, NY region, including owning my own business. During that period, my companies won hundreds of creative awards. I also had a close working relationship with the New York State Children’s Theater in Albany, a pioneering theater group that saw the debut of many important plays and musicals.

Since my return to New York City, I’ve concentrated on illustration, my first love. The city is, and has always been my favorite subject, and I’ve been creating work that captures its people and its music.

concert sketched on location by Joan Chiverton
Concert sketched on location


Tell us about your current/upcoming exhibits…

Recently I’ve had exhibits and been part of shows at the Society of Illustrators, NY Society of Etchers, New Jersey City University and the Mehu Gallery. I am represented by The Old Print Shop on Lexington Ave and 30 Street.

sketch at Bark Dog Walk for Cancer Society
sketch at Bark Dog Walk for Cancer Society


What do you enjoy most about teaching?

When students start to draw they observe their environment and see the world differently. It literally changes their lives. I especially enjoy seeing some of my students progress professionally and gain recognition in the arts. And of course, I love to see students using the talents and skills they’ve learned with me, to enrich their lives and professions, whatever path they choose.

Thank you for taking the time to chat with us!

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Joan Chiverton teaches SXD 635 Quick Sketching for the Pet Product Business and SXG 140 Life Drawing Basics for Costume Design.

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How to Design and Merchandise an Accessory Line

Meet our new Instructor, Art Veloira!

He will be teaching SXF 218 How to Design and Merchandise an Accessory Line, starting October 30, 2014!

FIT1

So, tell us a little about yourself…
I moved to New York in the summer of ’96, and immediately found a job in a costume jewelry company. For the last 18 years, wherever I lived and live, worked and work, I always walked the block of 39th Street, between 7th & 8th Avenues, five days a week. To this day, I would sometimes still stop and think how lucky I am to be working in the famed Garment District. The excitement goes on after so many years, without cease.
As a designer in a private label design and manufacturing facility, I’ve had the most rewarding experience of working with many famous labels and talented designers, including Peter Som, Zac Posen, Tommy Hilfiger, Michael Kors, Lela Rose, Isaac Mizrahi, and Doncaster Collection. This training has sharpened my skills as a designer and artisan with a unique perspective, and that is the ability to interpret, understand, and even get excited by an aesthetic that is not my own, as my prime objective is to deliver a piece–if not a collection–worthy of the customer’s label or name.

Was there a project or accomplishment that you consider to be significant in your career?
I consider that during the end of every major market season, Spring market in September and Fall market in February, is an accomplishment simply for having survived it, since I cater to the runway needs of a few designers during NY fashion week, and since accessories are oftentimes the last to be developed, I always worked with a challenging and tight deadline. Remember, I don’t work with just one or two designers at a time! I’m sure many designers would agree with me that talent and sense of style is a given, but stamina is another outfit we must put on every day, to make it in this industry.
But my very first taste of the garment district is what I consider most significant, in relation to my career as a designer. It was the searing summer of 1993, and to support my short stay in NYC as a struggling visual artist, I accepted a job as a delivery person to a dear friend who makes garment samples for a few clothing designers in the area. My afternoons were spent carrying multiple garment and shopping bags, schlepping them from Woodside to midtown, after a morning of ironing the freshly-sewn garments I was going to deliver. No blood, but sweat and tears, yes. But this experience opened me to the idea of possibly, one day, a career in fashion might be a nice idea?

What is exciting in the accessories market right now?
Since I work closely with different types of manufacturers, I hear more often now that there seems to be a boost in interest in manufacturing locally. This means that many designers will be more comfortable producing, since MOQ’s here are relatively not as high as any given factory in China. That to me is very exciting.

Can you give us a sneak peek of what your class will be like?
Other classes seem to have been attended by enthusiastic professionals who are mostly not in the fashion industry yet. I would expect this class to be the same, and by experience, I see that it’s not about trying to find inspiration in designing a collection, but rather, many students battle with the fact that they have too many ideas! My class will be about trimming and editing these ideas, culminating with a concept for a collection that is cohesive, impactful, and relevant. Lots of talk, visuals, and interaction!

Thank you and we look forward to your class!
To register for this class, please visit fitnyc.edu/noncreditregister

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My SS15 Fashion Week

Ann Yee (DENYC 2014)
Ann Yee SS14 Ann Yee SS14 Ann Yee SS14

Parke & Ronen (DENYC 2012)
Parke & Ronen SS14 Parke & Ronen SS14 Parke & Ronen SS14


I also attended this event with Instructor Melissa Hall: http://www.refinery29.com/2014/09/73904/bill-cunningham-fern-mallis-interview
Favorite bits:
“Fashion is armor to get through life.”
“I eat with my eyes.” (In response to question about food. When he moved into his new apartment the first thing he did was have the refrigerator removed to make more room for his file cabinets. He can always grab something at the deli. Doesn’t much care what he eats.)
Told a story about taking a photo of a woman because of the marvelous (his most used word) way the shoulder was cut in on her fur coat. Realized later it was Garbo.
Fiercely independent. For example, pays for his ticket to Paris each year. NYT would pay but then he’d have to do what they want him to.
He cried– touched that when spoke of mother gathering coal from the train tracks or sharing a story about a wonderful party on Fire Island (the last before the AIDS epidemic hit) or his experience of the famous 1973 Versaille fashion show– he had to stop and collect himself before returning to his almost constant smile.
Never spoke ill of his family although they clearly rejected him for being in fashion.