The New Black to Menswear

By , December 16, 2013 1:13 pm

By Jove: The Biz Buzz

Aha weekly tidbits for the HT Insider

Well, just when we thought the “new black” was going from grey to pink – news has it that new black is ….BLACK.  Of course for those of you haven’t noticed, black actually is the color of choice at FIT with both students and faculty.  I guess it must be that urban thing but I know I stand in front of a rack, and see all sorts of colors.  What do I buy?  The black. How about you?

WSJ Magazine, December 2013/January 2014. Check out this super layout.

Speaking of the WSJ, there was a great article last weekend on the surge in the men’s footwear business. Almost 2 full pages devoted to styles, care, shopping habits, etc. In fact, according to the Journal, men are starting to outpace women in building a full shoe wardrobe.  This is no surprise to us as the real excitement in the market both wholesale and retail right now is men’s. http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303497804579242313439812406  If you haven’t checked out the re-done menswear floors at Lord where it is  calm and well edited with  great values.  Go to the 9th and 10th floor and you will a full selection for all the men in your life, plus if you are a younger guy, there is lots of stuff for you.  I promise.  Don’t forget that HT is offering more and more menswear related  courses these days and all of Spring is now available on line.

If you haven’t had a chance to see the current HUE, the FIT alumni magazine there is a wonderful extensive article on tattoos that really connects with a post I made quite a while ago that we still get comments on.  Check it out. http://www.fitnyc.edu/3636.asp.

Looking for that last minute gift? How about a HOT TOPICS course?  Gift Certificates are available.  Go to D130, open through Friday afternoon at 5:30pm or http://bit.ly/1bYBlT1.

 

Are you still the sucker you used to be?

By , December 14, 2013 8:46 am

New research was just released that demonstrates a big shift in how consumers buy and what influences their purchase. Traditional ads no longer have the same power to shape consumer opinions as they once did. Amazon (the ultimate cost and quality comparison, along with others) influence consumers more than ever.  The studies were based on the “compromise” effect – (see NYT article below for the full story) are probably now saying to yourself, ho hum… and why is this news?  Well, it took a while for the establishment to document what most of us already know and practice organically.  However, some of the results of the study suggest that digital feedback in the digital world allows marketers to see what works and what doesn’t – what messages are influencing customers and which ones aren’t.  And they can make adjustments accordingly…and very quickly.  This is all very well and good, and excellent support (although the writers and researchers don’t see it from the customers’ point-of-view, so they are still missing the point) for my position that customer-focused information and insight right from the beginning…pre- advertising/marketing/PR efforts and spending, is more valuable than measuring what works after you’ve spent all that time, money and effort and then correcting it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/08/business/theres-power-in-all-those-user-reviews.html?smid=pl-share

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Thanksgiving to Personal Shopping

By , December 9, 2013 3:20 pm

By Jove: The Biz Buzz

Aha weekly tidbits for the HT Insider

Ok, so what are they saying?  The Friday after Thanksgiving is no longer black, its charcoal grey? Or is it barely black and now starts at 8 pm on the day before. Wasn’t grey the new black this year, anyway?

According to the WSJ, Tuesday 11/26 black Friday is a retail illusion.  I guess the market expression, “Mark it up to mark it down.” finally traveled from 7th Ave. to Wall St. Article- http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304281004579222370781619390

In case you missed the NYT, Sunday 11/21 article “It Takes a Lot of Money to Look This Good” both Emma Sosa and Joan Volpe (FIT Center for Professional Studies) were quoted. The article validates personal shopping as a service and career opportunity.  Kind of reminds me of the old cliché “Does Macy’s tell Gimbel’s?” since the WSJ ran “Really Personal Shopping” on 12/4 underscoring the same theme.   Of course we knew the value of the personal shopper  already since Image Consulting is the longest running Professional Development certificate program. But it is so nice to see top media thinking like us. Article- http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/01/fashion/Personal-Shoppers-Still-Busy.html?smid=pl-share

At the Retail Marketing Society luncheon on Tuesday 12/4 (absolutely one of the best networking and learning experiences in the market, www.retailmarketingsociety.org) the always profound Robin Lewis told it like it is in retail today “The Retail Future: Landscape or Landmines”. According to Robin the faster retailers embrace an Omni-Channel strategy the better their chances of survival. Pure players will not grow and Amazon is already opening stores.  Robin says the market desperately needs talent who understand Omni-Channel and can adapt decisions and merchandising to multi-formats.  Head’s up all of you taking courses in the Omni-Channel certificate.

Have you noticed? Students in the Color certificate program develop a trend forecast in SXC 260 and try to predict the hottest color for the coming season which is then used for the next Hot Topics catalog.

Guess what color Spring 2014 HT will be???

“Love it or Hate it, a new Pink is coming” the WSJ, Thursday, 12/5 as well as Gawker and several other media sources.  Just remember we’ve known about that color for weeks – it’s a Hot Topic! Article- http://gawker.com/the-2014-color-of-the-year-assaults-eyeballs-everywhere-1477259786

How a clothing line moved itself from product to brand

By , November 23, 2013 10:15 am

Here’s a really great case history about how a fashion company used customer-focused market research and marketing.

The TwirlyGirl clothing line polled their customers about the feelings/descriptive words that identified the clothing to them.  They took the results, which when all combined generated a single consistent image, and came up with the word “transformative”.  This was the genesis of the brand.  They next took this information a step further and changed all their copy to reflect the transformative attitude.

This not only became the brand, which TwirlyGirl now has established, but also positioned the company and clothing line in its own space with regards to other girls clothing lines.  A very important double punch to success.  Because there are lots of girls clothing lines, but only TwirlyGirl provides an experience with each piece of clothing. What a great differentiator and competitive advantage.  By following this course of action, they have created a strong niche for themselves.

http://www.twirlygirlshop.com/blog/post/3577776


Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.

She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Holiday Bizarre Pop-up Shop @ FIT

By , November 16, 2013 1:51 pm

Holiday Bizarre at FIT

Holiday Bizarre Pop-up Shop
November 19-23, 2013
11am-8pm
FIT, corner of 27th St & 7th Ave

FIT students in the department of Visual Presentation and Exhibit Design led by Assistant Professor Anne Kong have developed a “Holiday Bizarre” Themed shop inspired by the Surrealist and Dada art movements. This is a collaboration between FIT and The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s Thrift Shop, featuring women’s designer clothing, shoes, bags, jewelry, gift items, and furnishings.

All proceeds benefit the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

New law protects fashion/runway models and could cost YOU

By , November 16, 2013 8:18 am

On November 20, a new law New York State law will go into effect that qualifies and protects child (defined as anyone under the age of 18) print and runway models as “child performers”.
So what does this mean for a fashion designer using “young” talent?

Even if you are not paying your models a traditional fee, you are still affected by this new law. According to Wendy Stryker, who is  Counsel, Executive Compensation and Employment Group at Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC (a law firm who has a specialization in entertainment and media law) “I think that the new law is at odds with any practice of having models work for merchandise or experience.  It makes clear that employers using print and runway models who live or work in New York must comply with the permit, trust account and other provisions.  This will place additional administrative and financial burdens on all employers, and particularly on those without staff who are equipped to deal with the new paperwork. “

For a lot of you this new law will present a huge headache when planning to present new lines.  When you plan for your next runway show, trunk show, catalog, look book etc.  check out the age of the models you plan to use and make sure you are in compliance with the  law.  If you violate the law and are caught, your permit could be suspended and you could pay a fine of $1,000 for the first time you are caught, $2,000 for the second and so on.  Make sure you are in compliance by checking out your specific situation with your attorney or you can ask Wendy at wstryker@fkks.com.
Here are some more of the basic parts of this rule concerning the new law. For more information contact your attorney or Wendy.

Permits: Employers must now apply for and obtain a general Employer Certificate of Eligibility from the New York State Department of Labor before they employ any child performers. Employers must also verify that all child performers they employ have a valid employment permit from educational authorities such as a superintendent of schools as well as a certificate of physical fitness. All certificates and permits must be available at all times for inspection by authorized entities. At least two days before employing a child model, employers must also file a Notice of Use with the Department of Labor advising of their intent to employ child performers.  Notice of Use forms can be found http://labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/wp/LS556.pdf?utm_source=11.5.13+Fashion+Law+Alert&utm_campaign=11.6.2013+Fashion+Alert&utm_medium=email.

For purposes of the new law, a “child performer’s employer” will be considered a person or entity that employs a child model either directly, or through an agency or loan-out company.

Parent or Guardian: Child models must now have a designated responsible person on set at all times (for performers under age 16) or a nurse (for infants).

Trust Accounts: Prior to the first instance of employment, the Department of Labor requires that a child performer’s parent or guardian establish a child performer trust account. Employers must deposit at least 15% of the child’s gross earnings into this trust account. Trust accounts may be set up anywhere, so long as they meet the New York State requirements, or are a California “Coogan” type account.

Limited Work Hours: Under the existing child performer regulations, child performers are limited to restricted working hours based on age and school attendance. A chart summarizing the permitted working hours can be found http://labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/wp/LS559.pdf?utm_source=11.5.13+Fashion+Law+Alert&utm_campaign=11.6.2013+Fashion+Alert&utm_medium=email.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Gentlemen’s Vintage Clothing Show and Sale

By , November 15, 2013 10:01 am

This looks to be an interesting event!
If you go, please let me know how it was.

Gentlemen’s Vintage Show and Sale

 

Interested in Menswear classes? Check out:
SXF 325 Men’s Image Consulting with Style
SXF 335 Fit, Balance, and Proportion Fundamentals for Men’s Image and Styling
SXF 340 Most Iconic Menswear Milestones in Fashion History
SXS 330 Fashion Styling for Men

 

EduTech Day: Building for the Future

By , November 12, 2013 8:58 am

Fifth Annual EduTech Day at FIT
Thursday, November 14th
9am-4pm
The Great Hall & John E. Reeve’s Conference Center
Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, NY

Edu Tech Day 2013 flyer

The day will include presentations, panels, workshops, luncheon and book signing by Jason Miles – bestselling author and expert in Pinterest and Instgram!

The Technology Development Team (TDT) in collaboration with The Center for Excellence in Teaching will be holding the fifth annual EduTech Day on Thursday, November 14, 2013. Our theme “Building for the Future” focuses on how we can integrate technology and pedagogy in response to the increasingly complex and diverse environments faculty will encounter academically and students will encounter professionally. This year’s theme is in part responsive to the college’s plan of strengthening the academic core, which will be reinforced while keeping an eye on emerging trends in the professional world. Among our goals are to foster student-centeredness within the FIT community by focusing on collaborative activities. The event will provide hands-on experience linking best practices in education and in professions with current and emerging trends in technology.

When technology intersects with fashion – you benefit.

By , November 9, 2013 8:17 am

There’s a new tech idea/website that’s been specifically developed for fashion designers (although other businesses can certainly use it).  It seems to be a cross between crowdfunding/sourcing and market testing.  Here’s how it works: A designer posts several new items from their upcoming collection – or variations on one item – for instance the designer could post one item in multiple colors to see which color is the most appealing. The customer, if interested in the item, makes a commitment to purchase it.  When orders reach a minimum number designated by the designer, then the customer is charged and the designer starts production.  If the orders don’t reach that minimum, then the customer is refunded their money and the designer doesn’t produce it.  It’s a fashion variation on the crowdfunding theme.  But this idea goes one step further.

In crowdfunding, you go to a designated crowdfunding website and put up your idea.  Then there’s a huge hurdle which people rarely discuss – marketing. You have to market like hell to get people to go to the crowdfunding site. So you are essentially doing double marketing – first for your own website (assuming you have one) and second to the crowdfunding site.  With this product, you actually overlay the crowdfunding program onto your own website, thus driving people to your website only, which I think is a much more organic way to market yourself (although you will lose the crowdfunding site surfers who might be a source of revenue).

The concept sounds like a total win-win for the customer and for the designer.  It’s a great way for the customer to be not only ahead of the trend but to actually influence the trend – and to be the first wearing a new style.   Customers order their clothes in advance, and designers don’t risk wasting materials and manufacture for a product that isn’t going to sell well, thus avoiding excess inventory and cash flow difficulties among other issues.

So far, Voy-voy, a NY based clothing company, Feit, a shoe and accessories company, and Gustin, a jeans company are all using this new concept.

It’s called Mimoona – to learn more and hear testimonials, visit the site and see if it’s something that will work for you.  http://www.we.mimoona.com/Projects/1443?share=true&reffID=4299.

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

3D Printing

By , November 8, 2013 3:09 pm

3d demo

An up close and personal conversation with the Chief Technology Officer of MakerBot, Justin Day, on Tuesday, November 12 at 6:30 pm in the Marvin Feldman Center, 2nd Floor, Haft Auditorium. The implications of 3-D printing on the fashion industry cannot be understated. It has the potential to do great things: create shorter lead times for designers, offer the ability to produce things in smaller quantities, and create easy personalization. Hear how a Brooklyn-based company, MakerBot, is helping lead the world of fashion into the digital age.
Free and No Sign Up Required.
For more information contact Steven Brookstein at 212-217-4496.

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