Category: Tech Tuesday

Learn WordPress — Starts May 28, 2014

By , May 20, 2014 3:30 pm

Altered WordPress Logo

Have you heard about WordPress?

If you haven’t you are

  1. Not living on Planet Earth
  2. Not reading this page which was made using WordPress

WordPress is one of the most versatile and user-friendly web publishing applications. It has been enjoying rapid and widespread use over the past few years. Find out how easy it is to make web sites, change or create themes, add plugins and expand your offerings to clients – or maybe you just want to create a new web site for yourself.

Do all of this without having to know a lick of code!! How crazy is that?!?!?

Learning WP is a skill that you can hardly live without in today’s world whether you are just making a web site or are going to work for others.

And besides. Its too much fun.

Here is where you can get started learning something that is fun and useful.

Next Class Starts Wednesday, May 28, 2014!!

Details And Registration

Not too late to enroll and start learning WP!!

Contact Instructor Bud Kraus bud@joyofcode.com if you have questions.

 

Bud Kraus teaches CTD 600 Web Design: HTML , CTD 605 Web Design: Cascading Style Sheets, and CTD 613: WordPress.

Learn How To Style Web Pages With CSS Starting 3/2

By , February 25, 2014 8:00 am

CSS

What is CSS, you ask?

It’s Cascading Style Sheets and it is what designers use to style web pages. With CSS we add art direction – typography, layout, color and background images to our pages.

My next CSS class on FIT campus  starts Sunday, March 2 and ends the following Sunday. We go from 10 AM – 5Pm and if you’re nice to me  I will even let you take me to lunch.

Here are the topics we do with hands on exercises and demonstrations:

1. Smart ways to set font size.
2. Working with color and background properties.
3. Tried and true layout techniques.
4. Rollover navigation without javascript.

Plus we will get a good look at what Responsive Design is all about.

Yes, CSS3 is built into what I teach.

Since most web sites today are built upon a pre-existing framework I will introduce you to that idea as well. And if you have ever seen me create a customized WordPress theme and want to do it yourself this class is a must!!

This class is good for anyone but web design and developer wannabes wool love it the most. You will need to know some HTML before you take this class.

Now Go And Register Before It’s Too Late!!

 

Bud Kraus teaches CTD 600 Web Design: HTML , CTD 605 Web Design: Cascading Style Sheets, and CTD 613: WordPress.

EduTech Day: Building for the Future

By , November 12, 2013 8:58 am

Fifth Annual EduTech Day at FIT
Thursday, November 14th
9am-4pm
The Great Hall & John E. Reeve’s Conference Center
Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, NY

Edu Tech Day 2013 flyer

The day will include presentations, panels, workshops, luncheon and book signing by Jason Miles – bestselling author and expert in Pinterest and Instgram!

The Technology Development Team (TDT) in collaboration with The Center for Excellence in Teaching will be holding the fifth annual EduTech Day on Thursday, November 14, 2013. Our theme “Building for the Future” focuses on how we can integrate technology and pedagogy in response to the increasingly complex and diverse environments faculty will encounter academically and students will encounter professionally. This year’s theme is in part responsive to the college’s plan of strengthening the academic core, which will be reinforced while keeping an eye on emerging trends in the professional world. Among our goals are to foster student-centeredness within the FIT community by focusing on collaborative activities. The event will provide hands-on experience linking best practices in education and in professions with current and emerging trends in technology.

Learn WordPress — Starts November 14, 2013

By , November 5, 2013 5:44 pm

Altered WordPress Logo

Have you heard about WordPress?

If you haven’t you are

  1. Not living on Planet Earth
  2. Not reading this page which was made using WordPress

WordPress is one of the most versatile and user-friendly web publishing applications. It has been enjoying rapid and widespread use over the past few years. Find out how easy it is to make web sites, change or create themes, add plugins and expand your offerings to clients – or maybe you just want to create a new web site for yourself.

Do all of this without having to know a lick of code!! How crazy is that?!?!?

Learning WP is a skill that you can hardly live without in today’s world whether you are just making a web site or are going to work for others.

And besides. Its too much fun.

Here is where you can get started learning something that is fun and useful.

Next Class Starts Thursday, November 14, 2013!!

Details And Registration

For questions about this class contact Bud Kraus, bud@joyofcode.com.

Fashion Tech Event

By , August 17, 2013 10:26 am

If fashion tech interests you, or you are a fashion tech person, then this event is well worth attending.
http://fashiontech-ny.eventbrite.com/?utm_source=Copy+of+Copy+of+Copy+of+Events+June%2FJuly+2013&utm_campaign=MAY+2012&utm_medium=email

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Learn WordPress Starting May 29

By , May 21, 2013 3:59 pm

Altered WordPress Logo

Have you heard about WordPress?
If you haven’t you are

  1. Not living on Planet Earth
  2. Not reading this page which was made using WordPress

WordPress is one of the most versatile and user-friendly web publishing applications. It has been enjoying rapid and widespread use over the past few years. Find out how easy it is to make web sites, change or create themes, add plugins and expand your offerings to clients – or maybe you just want to create a new web site for yourself.

Do all of this without having to know a lick of code!! How crazy is that?!?!?

Learning WP is a skill that you can hardly live without in today’s world whether you are just making a web site or are going to work for others.

And besides. Its too much fun.

Here is where you can get started learning something that is fun and useful.

Details And Registration

For questions about this class contact Bud Kraus, bud@joyofcode.com.

Bud Kraus teaches CTD 600 Web Design: HTML , CTD 605 Web Design: Cascading Style Sheets, and CTD 613: WordPress.

4 Reason To LOL About Learning Online

By , March 19, 2013 8:21 am

Thinking of taking an online class, like my Web Design class, here at FIT?

Let me give you some reasons that you will not see any where else on why learning online just might be fore you.

  1. You can eat anything you want in class. Order a pizza and a coke and spill it over your keyboard. No one will tell you that you can’t have food in the lab.
  2. You can wear anything you want. Fashion is totally up to you when you take an online class. Work in your T-shirt or even a little less.
  3. When you get up at 2am, rather than eat a piece of chocolate cake, you can feed your brain with something good to learn.
  4. Didn’t swallow a bottle of Scope just before class? Not to worry. Bad breath is not a problem.

 

Some Online Classes that start soon
CEO 003: Formulating Your Financial Strategy
CTD 361: AutoCAD I
CTD 525: Interactive Design for Tablets and Smart Phones
CTD 600: HTML
SUS 001: Introduction to Sustainability
SUS 032: Sustainable Design Technology
SUS 041: Sustainable Product Development II
Click for all Online Classes offered

 

Bud Kraus teaches CTD 600 Web Design: HTML , CTD 605 Web Design: Cascading Style Sheets, and CTD 613: WordPress.

 

Social Media week – observations and a guest blogger on those observations

By , February 23, 2013 8:37 am

Social Media week was full of fantastic events with different experts in various sectors.  The networking was great because each venue had different people to meet and multiple points-of-view.

There were two global takeaways I had from the events I attended.

·   The first is that there’s still no magic bullet to get customers, even in social media.  SEO, blogs, websites, linked in, pinterest, etc. must all work in as part of a strategically organized system in order to be successful. And that requires a fair degree of participation on your, the entrepreneur’s, part

·   The second takeaway I observed and heard from techies who were self-proclaimed “not” marketing people (that’s how obvious the problem is) is that the paradigm of giving the customer what the company and ad agency wants hasn’t changed at all.  The only change is how it’s delivered –- using new, sexy technology.  This is troubling. For example, at the “Marketing without words” event, there was a discussion of social engagement through images. Tools to follow each visitor from first look to sale, re-tweet or re-pin, etc. is now available. It’s called Curalate.  Great. But what does it measure AFTER a customer’s visual trail?  How does that affect a company’s bottom line? Imagine how much more impactful a  brand would be if they asked their customers what THEY wanted to see before they posted anything.  I predict that audience participation would skyrocket.  And Curalate would confirm that.  There is some progress in that, but where’s the ROI?

Here are some thoughts by Joe Bergmann, who has many years of online marketing experience. His approach is simpler and more effective than anything I’ve heard in a long time.

“Just By Asking”

Why do ad/brand companies try so hard to quantify people? Why do they try to dictate what they want people to think? Why do they think they have the power to brand themselves in people’s minds?

Most ad/technology companies of late adopters (advertisers), try to be hip, thinking they are on top of the latest technology and social networks so that they can exploit early adopters (customers, who don’t want their social media invaded by yellow creamy cheese and canned soup). Advertisers talk about controlling “authentic” relationships directly with customers, as if that was possible. Actually, it’s self-delusional. And then they take that delusion in-house (what next — outsourcing that authenticity to India?). Unbelievable.

This is top-down, invasive thinking. Most companies believe that what is important to them is important to their audience. It’s eyeball gathering that gets dirty looks from the consumer, because it is perceived as interrupting customer conversations and trampling on their privacy. What it is, is bad manners. Many companies seem to have forgotten that serving the customer also serves their stockholders. Until companies stop imposing meaningless marketing messaging on people, they will be stuck in a morass of the latest technological gimmick and the old-fashioned broadcast mentality. The Internet is a graveyard of technologies and metrics that have been the next, best thing.

So what’s a company to do? Remember, your brand is what the customer experiences of you — not what you want them to think (no matter how much and where you advertise). To make that work for your company, you should consider asking your customers what’s important to them. All you have to do is ask. So few companies do that, because they fear the of loss of control. But loss of control is not a bad thing. Being too much in control will make you less effective in the sales process. It turns your marketing message into a monologue. And most monologues don’t produce sales. After all, that’s what marketing boils down to — sales. Giving in to your customers and listening to what matters to them is liberating. It helps you think clearly about how you should approach your audience — without trying to interpret what they mean. In our experience, your customers are more than willing to help. They are the most important asset your company has.

So why do so many marketing companies and ad agencies still operate in broadcast mode? Again, loss of control. So they offer focus groups to pick the “best” of their controlled ideas. So what if the best idea isn’t in the 3-5 boards presented. Just keep developing more controlled ideas. Wouldn’t it be simpler to ask the customer what’s important to them and then build your marketing around their needs? But that takes a willingness to lose control and let people speak freely.

But that takes an approach to market research that requires a sense of humility, listening skills and a commitment to giving people what they want from your company (and a good product  or service that meets a need doesn’t hurt). The problem with most companies is that they rationalize or assume they know what the customer wants without having ever asked. They think their product or service should be interesting without being interested in their customers. Or worse, to be able to manipulate their perception. It doesn’t work.

That’s why I developed the OpenMind session and methodology. There is no better way to discover what your audience wants — and helps you give it to them. It’s the simplest, most time and cost effective way to make your marketing work. One OpenMind session will open your eyes to a whole new way to brand your company and then turn that brand into an experience to your audience. In OpenMind sessions customers are the ones who inform you how they want to be “told and sold.” Then and only then can technology become a tool that enables you speak to their needs.

Just by asking.

To learn more about OpenMind visit: http://www.holtzmancom.com/teamwork_openmind.php

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

Brand MarkETing… No More Brand Marking!

By , January 31, 2013 12:06 pm

Brandpsych logo

Brand MarkETing

Are we seeing Trans-Planetary Brand MarkETing in our digitized mobile economy? Drawing by Arthur Winters

So what is the difference between brand marking and markETing?

In the past, branding was initially a way of marking or identifying a brand as in marking a rancher’s cattle with a branding iron. As time went on, logos were developed to mark and establish an identity for companies, products and services. More recently in our digitized world, brand managers must bring an ET — Extra-Terrestrial or more likely, an Essential Technology element to their branding. Bringing a more advanced brand marking to their brand markETing.

In the past few years, many customers have felt more of a divide between what they want and what brands offer. Brands that have a vision of what the customer really wants make the most of what their customers value and enjoy. In addition, the customer is increasingly aware of their involvement in product development in their role as “prosumer.”  We see an increase in the desire for personalization from and customization of products, services and experiences.

To satisfy their new brand expectations, customers are moving rapidly to shopping with online retailers. Retailer brands will have to explore more UC, Unified Communications, that include retail pop-up stores and departments similar to Amazon.com and kiosks for brand offers similar to Groupon.com. UC strategies will be created that involve real voice (as opposed to electronic menus) responses to customers’ demands for personal attention and customization.

Strong brands that fulfilled customer expectations in the past may diminish, as many consumers are no longer loyal to brands they perceive as category leaders. As always, Brand Managers have to create strategies that convert consumers into customers. The hard work is now in creating an innovative presentation of relevant and much desired brand attributes for the most effective brand positioning. Some brands are creating differences that are being told through their brand story. A compelling brand story and the brand’s history can be delivered to better sell the brand’s positioning assets, differences, and superiority.

So we find content and technology merging in new ways. Consumers may now depend on apps that provide applications to personally bring to mind brand differences and values. These can be inspired by knowledge of their singular profiles and their current desires. And right up there in ET brand positioning is the brand manager’s awareness of their customers who are not really engaged. Previous paradigms for customer-engagement may no longer be effective and customer experiences, CX, that are no longer current in today’s retail marketing, will need to adjust and innovate like never before!

Next, brands will rely more and more on VOC (Voice of customer), innovative interactions with customers and encourage buying recommended by their friends via social media. Successful brands will acquire more knowledge about operations involved in a consumer-run world. As we have mentioned previously, PDA’s/mobiles employed by consumers will dramatically increase. Consumers will be scanning their own screens to connect with a brand, and perhaps, influence their buying. A brand will need to unify all of its messaging and specifically its advertising that is designed for the mobile customer. This may include new screen-oriented techniques for these new retail venues. Google made over $20 billion in ad revenues this year, more than all U.S. print media combined!

We suggest the oft-quoted phrase: “The Future is NOW” — might apply.
What do you think?

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

RETAILOR-MADE… CUSTOMIZED CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES THROUGH MOBILE ENGAGEMENTS

By , December 27, 2012 6:09 pm

Brandpsych logo

RETAILORS might remember, as we have often suggested, to make their brand management an ongoing process of reinventing customer experiences and providing more personalized mobile engagements. For retailors, their creative strategies must now be based on their target customers’ own positioning of their most relevant attributes, differences and behaviors. Customers’ self-brand perceptions rely on their omni-present sources of contact, information and cultural sharing. The concept of “everywhereness” is a current zeitgeist in the mobile world, as exhibited in the Tracfone Everywhereness commercials.

Retail innovations by leading retailers mandate that all their strategic planning is a brand retailoring that evolves from their study of the current evolution of our species, technologically. Quickly gone is the concept of the physical “retail store” as a shopping destination or necessity. Struggling to remain relevant is the mission, “should you choose to accept it.” We hope it will not be a “Mission Impossible.”

Drawing by Art Winters

There is no doubt that mobile is now a bio-digital part of the customer, aka 21st Century Human. For example, living within all the “everywhereness,” retailors must consider that there is a stronger customer’s need for individuality, as exhibited through an interest in fashion tailor-mades or bespoke products – from clothing and accessories to automobiles. Mobile customers are quickly adopting and increasing their mobile “self-styling” options. Changing their shopping behavior more readily than those who are store-only shoppers. Retailors are building their “everywhereness” opportunities to attract more customers with new personalized mobile apps and interactive options.

Inevitably, retailers have to consider “showrooming” as a challenge. How should they strategically respond to this use of their physical store as a showroom and the Internet sites as the P.O.S.? Certainly the retailor is actively working to provide targeted CX (Customer Experiences) that offer personalized mobile and in-store service and incentives that would also advance their NPS (Net Promoter Score). Also, brand managers should be creating new, innovative, and more customer interaction options for their ever-changing loyalty programs and tailor-made offerings. The retailor must realize that since mobile technology enables the customer to shop many stores on their own time, from wherever they choose, it is time to get creative and inventive. Work at brand “relate-ability” with self-visualizations of value and helpful relevant touch points for the customer’s tailor-made desires.

Our thought is: “If retailers want to be anywhere, they must now be everywhere.”

 

Arthur & Peggy Winters co-teach SXB 200 Brand Marketing Communications for Image & Meaning and SXR 050 Intro to Branding: The Art of Customer Bonding.

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