Just say yes…to networking

A lot of business (particularly service businesses) is done by relationships.  Chemistry is one factor that helps to foster those relationships. Sharing an experience is another. That’s why networking is important.  (Yes online networking is important as well and chemistry and experience sharing occur there also but my focus in this post  is on in-person networking encounters).

Now, don’t just jump up and run to the nearest networking events – there are too many each day. So you have to be selective.

Here are some tips that work for me on events:

  • Select events that interest you – it’s easier to start conversations and ask questions of panels if you’re interested. Also once you’ve asked questions, people are aware of you and may approach you after the panel.
  • Stretch – go to an event that’s geographically different – cross the river –  if you’re in Manhattan, go to Brooklyn or New Jersey. I’ve gone as far as the outer suburbs of Philadelphia.  I was in a networking event in Newark, and had the opportunity to meet Christine Quinn, President of the New York City Council, and chat with her for a  few uninterrupted minutes – I might not have been able to do that in a Manhattan venue (especially in her district) because when she’s local, everyone wants to meet her.  A few months later, I ran into her again at another event and she recognized me – we chatted again and I was connected to her chief of staff for ongoing communication with her. Valuable connection.
  • Use social networking to find out which events are high quality.  Sometimes someone in the know will offer you a discount to the event. Almost always someone will direct you to a good event and maybe even one you hadn’t heard of before.
  • Get to the event early – I often wind up speaking with the guest speaker or panelists prior to the event before anyone knows who they are – after the panel, they are usually surrounded by lots of people.
  • Go no matter how you are feeling – sometimes just walking in the door without any expectations brings nice surprises.
  • Don’t expect to meet everyone.  That results in lots of business cards in the trash later.
  • Networking is not limited to a time and place – I know colleagues that got business by chatting while waiting on a long line at a professional meeting. Here are some other networking ideas http://adminsecret.monster.com/benefits/articles/1211-alternative-places-to-network

In my entrepreneurship classes, I sometimes run into an individual who is shy and says they can’t network. There is one universal answer: “get over it!”   If you are starting a business, the single most important factor in the business is you  — YOU ARE YOUR BRAND.  You must get out there and network because people are buying you.

Here are some more tips on how to make your networking succeed: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-bernard/six-tips-how-to-network_b_1954824.html

 

Sandra Holtzman teaches CEO 035: Licensing.
She is the author of Lies Startups Tell Themselves to Avoid Marketing.

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