Colors in Serapes, Rio Grande Weavings, Contemporary Kachinas and more!

By , September 28, 2011 9:30 am

THE COLOR CORNER

I am over the moon when I see colors that sing to me. This happens very frequently when I see color combinations that turn me on. Some are part of the landscape like this wonderful blue pick-up truck that is out at Ice’s Farm & Teahouse in Alcaide, NM. What a treat! Just take a look at these fantastic serape and Rio Grande weavings and Gregory Lomayesva’s Hopi Kachina dolls.

Rio Grande weaving started after 1540 when Churro sheep came to NM with Coronado’s expedition. Serapes are long shawls that are brightly colored with fringes and are worn in Mexico by men.

Gregory Lomayesva is an American artist with Hopi Indian roots who uses his imagination and amazing sense of color to recreate traditional shapes of Kachina dolls. The Hopi believe that the spirits (Kachinas) come down to the villages to dance and sing and give gifts to children, bring rain and are known to be deities.

Barbara Arlen teaches SXC 100: Color Theory and Culture, SXC 110: Color Discovery Interactive Workshop, SXC 260:Color Painting Studio, and SXF 840: Career Opportunities for Working with Color.

One Response to “Colors in Serapes, Rio Grande Weavings, Contemporary Kachinas and more!”

  1. Delia says:

    What a bevvy if inspiration! I love the ponchos, especially the one with great geometric detailing that’s second from the right.

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