Posts tagged: C.J. Yeh

The Media Design Club in motion

By , October 20, 2013 10:39 am

So the organizers of World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship decide they want their awards ceremony preview to be media experimentation. You’re Prof. C.J. Yeh, and you say “of course” because every design challenge to this guy is “of course.”

Prelude to the World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship

The event, to be held at the Museum of the Moving Image, was ideal for motion graphics. Yeh hailed students from the Media Design Club to create an immersive environment. It meant setting up five large-scale projectors in a space where nothing can be put on walls or ceiling. They devised a tripod system consisting of “a laser tripod that can be raised nine feet high,” says Yeh. “We combined that with the boom stick for the microphone stand and hung the projector on top of that. Did I mention we had four hours?”

For the prelude, old horror flicks are shown juxtaposed with student videos, ones that pose challenges and “a call-to-action,” says Yeh. Let’s watch:

“Last Drop,” by Alexis Gallo was completed in broadcast design CD441, a course for graphic design and advertising design juniors.

“I liked that texture is being used in ‘Last Drop.’ These days given the popularity of digital tools design, projects easily become ‘too perfect’ using a lot of the digital color and shapes. In this piece Alexis hand-cut shapes, then scanned them in to get the tactile feel that is perfect for the topic,” says Yeh.

The State of Inequality,” by Christina Hogan

“What’s most innovative is the way Christina, a graphic design senior, used graphic elements as well as all the details in the motion,” says Yeh.

“Case Study: Project Dreamer,” by Annie Zeng and Cindy Leong was created in graphic design in digital media GD344, a six semester sequence for graphic design and advertising majors.

“This particular semester the final project is to create an online interactive project to support something that they hold dearly. The project authors decided to use social media platforms to remind us to  never stop chasing our dreams,” says Yeh.

And then it was on with the gala.

“It was exciting to see how the experience empowered the students. Often the conversation is between designer and designer. This competition gave them a chance to get feedback from business people and entrepreneurs. Even while setting up the show, people were curious and talking to us. They were watching our setup — seeing how in such a short time we could deliver.”

Photo courtesy of World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Raves for Cintiq keep coming

By , October 12, 2013 10:43 am

It’s not a new disco, a cutting edge designer or the stylist from the Hunger Games.  It’s a revolutionary technology in the drawing industry. “Think of it as an interactive iPad connected to a computer,” says C.J. Yeh,  professor of communications design. “You use a special ‘pen’ to draw or manipulate images directly on a touch screen. Cintiq is precise. It’s pressure sensitive, too, so it feels like working with traditional media,” says Yeh.  

Illustration student Eduardo Cuba

“In Chinese, we say: ‘good tools are essential to a job well done.’  Professionals spend a lot for tools like Cintiq because they are critical to reducing friction in the creative process.  Technology is not equal to creativity, however. Technology provides the necessary support to facilitate the creative workflow. – Prof. C.J. Yeh

Cintiq is a natural evolution of stylists-on-tablets also pioneered by Wacom. In the previous version says Yeh “When you were operating the mouse, your eyes were looking at the screen not at the mouse.  In a sense, your hand and your eyes were only remotely connected. With Cintiq, you work directly on the screen so you have much more control.  You are looking at what and where you are drawing.”

Illustration student Chase Beck Michaelis

“It’s number one virtue is its immediate connection between creativity through the hand to the computer. It gets a lot of students over the hump of going digital” says Dan Shefelman, professor of illustration. 

“This is so cool,” says illustration student Naya Diaz as she draws on a Cintiq. “It’s not something you’d otherwise have access to.” Cintiq displays can cost well over $3,000.”

Illustration student Kerri Brown

“We need to be well rounded in both the traditional and cutting-edge methods of making artwork,”  says illustration student Rebekah Bennington. “While I love that the FIT illustration program has focused heavily on traditional media, it’s great to see the school embracing this awesome technology. The touch screen really helps narrow that gap between traditional media and computer media in a way that a tablet doesn’t quite manage.”

Illustration Prof. Dan Shefelman with class in the Cintiq lab

Cintiq can open students’ eyes to new possibilities in digital imaging.  I believe it is a perfect bridge into  the world of digital media for visual artists because it resynchronized the hands and the eyes,” says Yeh.

In the past, illustration student Giancarlo A. Fernandéz says he “stood staunchly on the side of traditional media…I was reared on traditional media, and for the most part work faster and more efficiently with pencil in hand…While working with a stylus on a tablet seemed to make digital work less alien, it did nothing to push me toward embracing software.”

Fast forward to Fernandéz’s first experience in the Cintiq computer lab. “For the first time working digitally seemed visceral–no need for an extensive knowledge of the inner workings of a program. This felt like a new incarnation of ‘traditional’ media. The possibilities are so exciting…Working on the Cintiq made digital work so approachable and familiar…I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to see the artistry that can be achieved on a screen as opposed to a canvas.”

It turns out, says Fernandéz,”Cintiq can make a believer out of even the most reluctant traditionalist.”

 

FIT temporarily exports Dean Arbuckle to Taiwan

By , August 6, 2013 4:26 pm

Dean Arbuckle, C.J. Yeh , int’l faculty & Asian Univ. of Taiwan students w/ their collaborative projects

Call it creative ingenuity across disciplines and cultures. And call it the product of a long flight to Taiwan!  Last week under the direction of Prof. C.J. Yeh from Communication Design, students from Asia University of Taiwan participated in a four-day workshop with a visiting assortment of international academics, including Dean Joanne Arbuckle.

Collaborative projects with an unusual mix of disciplines — including fashion, communication and industrial design — were judged on the last day of the workshop.

Dean Arbuckle led a group that used its fashion and product design skills to produce hats.  “It’s an exciting process when you bring students together from disciplines that don’t traditionally work together,” said Dean Arbuckle. 

Ad design students showcase and mingle at The One Club

By , May 9, 2012 4:40 pm

If you’re an advertising design student, having your work shown at the The One Club 18th Annual Student Exhibition is more than a singular honor.  This year the student exhibition is showcasing the best advertising design projects submitted by students from 30 schools from 15 cities and 5 countries. Selected for display were 30 print advertising campaigns and 20 motion graphics projects created by FIT students from Advertising Design and the Media Design Club.

ad students checking out The One Club work/photo: Birgit Schwarz-Hickey

The event is part of The One Club’s Creative Week, which includes educational conferences, the Student-Client Pitch and various award shows. This year, the events were held at Eyebeam,  NYC’s prestigious art and technology center.

“The vibe was right and seeing all of the best ad design work in one room from schools across the country was inspirational,”  said BFA student Stephen Weisbrot,  whose digital work appeared on  one of FIT’s eight computers ” It took this theory of advertising that I’ve been studying and exploring at FIT and brought it into a real life application.”

FIT students next to their work at The One Club/photo: Birgit Schwarz-Hickey

“The response was outstanding,” said Assistant Professor Birgit Schwarz-Hickey for AD.FIT was one of the only colleges showing digital work, which is expected by the industry after graduation.” – Assistant Professor Birgit Schwarz-Hickey

photo: CJ Yeh 

30 print advertising campaigns and 20 motion graphics projects from FIT were selected for the exhibition.

FIT student work for  The One Club 18th Annual Student Exhibition was organized and curated by professors Joe Stalluppi, Birgit Schwarz-Hickey and C. J. Yeh.

Invite to REPURPOSE Opening in the form of pizza delivery

By , May 25, 2011 4:11 pm

Dean Arbuckle accepted a surprise pizza delivery from Prof. C.J.Yeh of the Communication Design Dept. today. This was no ordinary pizza. No extra cheese, mushrooms or pepperoni. But the ingredients were purely artisan-made!

“Dear Joanne,” the delivery slip read. “Please come join us at the opening of this exciting exhibition! Thursday from 5-8 PM @ Red Bull Space.”
Inside the “custom made to your order” pizza box lay 40 collectible mini posters by the designers of the REPURPOSE Show. All are invited and welcome!

The opening for the REPURPOSE exhibit is May 26th at the Red Bull Space, located at: 15 Watts St, #4, hrs. 5-8 p.m. The show remains open from: 12-6 p.m., Friday through Sunday. Subway: A, C, E, 1 to Canal St.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy