Category: Student Exhibit

Portrait of Christine: not overdoing the details

By , April 4, 2014 5:30 pm
It’s so well executed: the bright-eyed sideward gaze and razor thin eyebrows. Teal-colored nails the right degree garish. A hidden expression behind a fantasy novel and an overall noir feel. “It was a process of learning when to stop, so as not to overdo certain details,” says Hiu Lim of her “Portrait of Christine,” created in Prof. John Nickle’s fifth semester illustration class.
Hiu Lim's "Portrait of Christine"

Hiu Lim’s “Portrait of Christine”

Part of Lim’s process was to create a grisaille, a painting executed almost entirely in monochrome. “It was very helpful in establishing the values and the overall warmth of the piece,” she says. “The undertone helped bring a brightness to some parts of the skin and clothes.” 

“Portrait of Christine” is on display on the third floor of the Pomerantz building. “I first saw Hiu’s work in the second semester and I am quite impressed by her growth as a painter,” says Prof. Nickle. “In just the fifth semester she is painting at a very high skill level.”

Says Lim “The painting was really a great learning experience.”

The masters reloaded

By , April 2, 2014 5:51 pm

Holding a teddy bear hostage while flaunting an arcade machine gun and goggles may be a geek’s mojo. It’s also a characterization of video game-obsessive Hyoung, a close friend of student illustrator Giancarlo Alicea. “Hyoung has a vivid imagination and a wry wit.  He’s a happy guy who is also serious and driven,” says Alicea who sought classical means to capture his friend’s duality.

Giancarlo Alicea

Giancarlo Alicea’s “Hyoung Uncommon”

“Hyoung Uncommon” was a product of “classical portraits re-imagined,” Prof. John Nickle’s assignment for a fifth semester illustration class. Students applied classical painting techniques and a “contemporary spin,” to an acrylic painting. It struck Alicea as an opportunity “to make a post-apocalyptic video game character seem magnanimous.”

Alicea chose a pharaonic pose and an undefined background, so that the focus would remain on his subject — a trick of the old masters. “The lack of extraneous detail helped focus the piece.” 

Says Prof. Nickle, ”The portrait of Hyoung is both sensitive and comical.”

Giancarlo Alicea's Initial rough sketch

Giancarlo Alicea’s Initial rough sketch of “Hyoung Uncommon”

Alicea completed an early drawing, “mapping the value relationships and figuring out composition.” He then worked on an “in-progress monotone painting,” a technique “of painting in values first in order to glaze in colors on top. It helps give the final painting good luminosity.”

Monotone underpainting before color glazes are applied

Monotone underpainting of “Hyoung Uncommon” before color glazes are applied

“I love seeing the sketch with the finish to reveal some of his process,” says Prof. Nickle. “Giancarlo made constant revisions to the finished painting, which continued even after the semester ended.”

From the earliest concepts to the actual painting, says Alicea, “Prof. Nickle was a source of wisdom and support. Without his help I wouldn’t have had ‘Hyoung Uncommon’ in my portfolio.”

Albrink and Arnold’s art of matchmaking

By , March 11, 2014 3:18 pm

No one knows what a couple might be thinking in a classical painting. But we sure know what their artful counterparts are thinking in Lynn Albrink and Laura Arnold’s modern replicas for their Match.com ad campaign. It’s something like “I really like this girl. How do I get her to the altar?” Or, “He’s hot. I’m so lucky I could pinch myself.”

Jan van Eyck "The Arnolfini Portrait"

Ad based on Jan van Eyck “The Arnolfini Portrait”

“It’s about finding your perfect match to show that dating and even the experience of finding ‘the one’ can be fun,” says graphic design student Lynn Albrink.

The project grew from a Fine Art’s-related assignment: go to a museum, find an artwork you like, and create an ad.

When Albrink and Arnold saw René Magritte’s surrealist painting of raining men, they had an idea. It could be reworked to represent a single woman watching men pour out of the sky. Such easy picking! And a perfect metaphor for an abundance of eligible men one might hope to find on match.com

Ad based on Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte’s “Raining Men”

Ad based on Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte’s “Golconda”

Albrink and Arnold continued with their match.com theme for the next assignment in Professor Frank Csoka’s Foundation in Advertising Design class. “We used the same idea to create an entire campaign for match.com,” says Advertising Design student Arnold.

behance-1s

Ad based on Jean Honoré Fragonard’s “Girl on the Swing”

They weren’t the only ones enjoying themselves. “It was an amazing and interesting experience working with Lynn and Laura on the ‘Girl on the Swing’ ad,” says Annie Yang who modeled for the ad. “It’s funny when I picture how I had to sit on a cooler while holding one chopstick in each hand. They even threaded a string through my black dress and pulled it back to give it the effect of movement.”

Professor Csoka oversaw the ad campaign with great enthusiasm.”There are so many works of art with couples, the thought was that this campaign could go on forever.”

Ad based on Jack Vettriano's "Singing Butler"

Ad based on Jack Vettriano’s “Singing Butler”

The complete project, with photos and details of how the project was completed, is in the 5th floor hallway between the D and E buildings.

Albrink and Arnold from  Rheine, Germany and Innsbruck, Austria respectively, met in class last semester. They are currently working on another project together and talking about starting a business after a few years of industry experience.

To see photos of the progression of the match.com campaign and other works they created together go to: lala design on Behance

 

To Russia with Love

By , February 11, 2014 8:01 pm

Most preoccupations FIT students have with snow and ice have to do with deciding how many layers to wear or blankets to pile on at night. But three Visual Presentation & Exhibition Design students found a way to send their support to the Olympic community. Here are three of their windows on Sochi with rainbow motifs.

Audrey Guadagnoli

Audrey Guadagnoli

A three-member Sochi window team formed in Prof. Peter-Tolin Baker’s freshmen exhibition design class. It included: Audrey Guadagnoli, Lilli Risler and Madelaine Auble.

“The assignment was to create three window designs central to a holiday pop theme,” says Prof. Baker. Each model is 15″ x 29″. “The challenge was blending a popular culture reference into a holiday winter-themed window,” he said.

“We had a hard time at first coming up with a pop culture reference,” says Audrey.

“We didn’t want to take it too literally. We also didn’t want to do anything too ‘holiday’ because everyone would be doing that,” says Lilli.

Sochi SMcopy

“Passing it on to you…Equality is in Your Hands”  Lilli Risler

One night Audrey saw a commercial for the Winter Olympics. “It’s celebrated around the world. It stood out. We talked about it in class and our teacher mentioned the gay rights controversy. It added another layer to our window theme,” says Audrey.

“It turned it into a pop culture theme,” says Lilli. “We chose MAC Cosmetics because we thought they were likely to be sympathetic toward the cause.”

“Social commentary is a big feature in effective window display,” says VPED Chair Craig Berger. “It draws you into a current story that expands into a broader commentary. The Winter Olympics is such a great current story.”

Lower1_2098

Madelaine Auble

Prof. Berger says that this project is the first opportunity that students have in their courses to develop an individual display.

“Given the confines of the space, successful projects have to have a ‘wow’ factor,” says Berger. “Yet they also have to be executed with a great deal of craft to be seen up close. These windows achieve that.”

Audrey agrees that “Everything has to be perfect. You make mistakes every project and you get critiques and apply it to your next window.”

Says Lilli “You have to pay close attention to detail working at this size. It helped us learn to plan ahead.”

After a long day of classes, both Audrey and Lilli sneak in a recap of the Olympic games.

“Curling is my favorite,” says Audrey. “My parents love it!”

“I really like the snowboarding half pipe,” says Lilli.

The Sochi-themed windows from Prof. Peter-Tolin Baker exhibition design class are on the 4th floor of the Marvin Feldman Center, or C-building. They will remain up until early April.

photos: Peter-Tolin Baker

 

Holly Jo’s Staged Reality

By , December 10, 2013 4:47 pm

On a day leading up to the BFA photography exhibit, Holly Jo Schnaudigel was looking over her “Staged Reality” photo printed on crêpe georgette and backed with chiffon. The cinematic portrait shows a rapt t.v. viewer wearing negligee and curlers. She’s a gal whose glamour doesn’t fade. She’s not the least bit interested in the camera. But she looks like she’d be easy to get to know, and to like. Just like Holly Jo.  The piece is currently part of the “Departures” exhibit in the Feldman Center lobby on view until December 13.

Currently on exhibit “Staged Reality,” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

“I think ‘Staged Reality’ is a visual enigma. It isn’t until you get close that you see multiple layers of the fabric. You almost have to work through them. The imagery, the look, is simple to how she creates it.” - photography professor Curtis Willocks

We chatted with Holly Jo about “Staged Reality,” her “lingerie-inspired” piece, and about the techniques and experimentation she began in her teens:

“What I experimented with in Lakeland High School Westchester, NY), I was able to do on a bigger scale at FIT,” she says.

“Long Distance” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Holly Jo began a disciplined study of darkroom techniques before coming to FIT. “There are more tangible materials when you’re in the darkroom that I wanted to extend to the digital world,” she says.

“Holly’s choice of a soft fabric print blends seamlessly with the satin fabrics in the (“Staged Reality”) photograph. You almost can’t tell which you are looking at since the subject and the print have folds and reflections that are really the same. It was a great choice of a surface that enhances the experience of the image.” -photography professor Doug Mulaire

She now uses an “arsenal of arts and crafts techniques” to combine recognizable styles from different time periods.  ”I take aesthetics from the 50s and 60s and add modern elements, like digital hand coloring and gluing glitter to photos and then scan them.”

“Stocking Stuffers” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

 “I was hands-on in the darkroom. Now I’m hands-on in choosing fabrics, which are also about touch and feel. Applying glitter, and digitally hand coloring are extensions of darkroom techniques I learned,” she says.

“Think Fast” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

“The way I dress and present myself is reflected in my photos,” says Holly Jo. Even her manner, she says, is a lot of 50s kitschy humor and old Hollywood aesthetics.

“She’s almost a period piece,” says Willocks. “She reminds me of the 40s and 50s especially when you talk to her.”

“Damsel in Undress” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Of another project “jump started” by images of pictures shown in a class taught by Professor Doug Mulaire.  ”They were drawn on, and in others a filter was used with a shape in front of the lens. I tried ‘drawing’ with glitter! The ‘comic book’ photographs were inspired by my interest in Roy Lichtenstein prints,” said Holly Jo.
“Combining her 50′s glamour photos with Roy Lichtenstein’s graphic style is great direction that Holly came up with. It gives her work another component that is full of possibilities!” – Prof. Mulaire

“I like combining story-making elements in an old Hollywood glamour style. The comic book effect is something I am trying in order to achieve this combined look.”

“Simply Marvelous” self-portrait by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

Double negative exposures, hand coloring, and sepia and cyan toning, were techniques that Holly Jo carried over from high school.

“I did projects that included hand coloring darkroom prints, which led to digitally hand coloring my pictures now,” she says.

“One of my finals was all in-darkroom double negatives, a method I used in Prof. Max Hilaire’s class. “My private study final project were darkroom prints painted over with glow-in-the-dark paint.” Holly Jo’s “light painting” method on pictures  led to her current glitter project.

“Boudoir” by Holly Jo Schnaudigel

 Says Photography Department Chair Ron Amato, “Some students have a proclivity toward experimentation and investigation. It could be a part of a natural investigation, or personality or environment.” 

For Holly Jo, it’s all three.

 

The “Departures” exhibit in the Feldman Center lobby until December 13. To see more of Holly Jo Schnaudigel’s work go to Holly Jo Photo

Halloween lingers — not Christmas yet at FIT

By , November 1, 2013 3:24 pm

As New York stores start putting up their Christmas decorations, Halloween continues to linger at FIT…at least until the next downpour.

Andrea Granados

Lauren French

Ash Cashington

The Media Design Club in motion

By , October 20, 2013 10:39 am

So the organizers of World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship decide they want their awards ceremony preview to be media experimentation. You’re Prof. C.J. Yeh, and you say “of course” because every design challenge to this guy is “of course.”

Prelude to the World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship

The event, to be held at the Museum of the Moving Image, was ideal for motion graphics. Yeh hailed students from the Media Design Club to create an immersive environment. It meant setting up five large-scale projectors in a space where nothing can be put on walls or ceiling. They devised a tripod system consisting of “a laser tripod that can be raised nine feet high,” says Yeh. “We combined that with the boom stick for the microphone stand and hung the projector on top of that. Did I mention we had four hours?”

For the prelude, old horror flicks are shown juxtaposed with student videos, ones that pose challenges and “a call-to-action,” says Yeh. Let’s watch:

“Last Drop,” by Alexis Gallo was completed in broadcast design CD441, a course for graphic design and advertising design juniors.

“I liked that texture is being used in ‘Last Drop.’ These days given the popularity of digital tools design, projects easily become ‘too perfect’ using a lot of the digital color and shapes. In this piece Alexis hand-cut shapes, then scanned them in to get the tactile feel that is perfect for the topic,” says Yeh.

The State of Inequality,” by Christina Hogan

“What’s most innovative is the way Christina, a graphic design senior, used graphic elements as well as all the details in the motion,” says Yeh.

“Case Study: Project Dreamer,” by Annie Zeng and Cindy Leong was created in graphic design in digital media GD344, a six semester sequence for graphic design and advertising majors.

“This particular semester the final project is to create an online interactive project to support something that they hold dearly. The project authors decided to use social media platforms to remind us to  never stop chasing our dreams,” says Yeh.

And then it was on with the gala.

“It was exciting to see how the experience empowered the students. Often the conversation is between designer and designer. This competition gave them a chance to get feedback from business people and entrepreneurs. Even while setting up the show, people were curious and talking to us. They were watching our setup — seeing how in such a short time we could deliver.”

Photo courtesy of World Summit on Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Piazza’s work bridges the gap between classroom & industry

By , July 1, 2013 1:39 pm

We exclaimed over the beautiful patterns as we stood looking at Isabel Piazza’s fabric designs at the AAS Graduating Show. And then just as soon we were lost in fantasies about all the nice things we could make for ourselves out of spectacular fabrics we imagined being made from Piazza’s designs.    

“Birds in Paradise” by Isabel Piazza

Intrigued by her folk art style with elements that are expressive and gentile, we caught up with the former Eastern religion-psychology major turned FIT fabric styling major. Piazza is having a very busy summer. She’s working at two different design studios that focus on prints for apparel and high-end home furnishings.

“Small and humorous things…whether it’s paint chipping off a wall, an interesting shadow cast on the ground, or a renown work of art,” are Piazza’s inspirations. “The screws and bolts that hold up a building,” aren’t minutia to Piazza, “they are just as important as the building itself.”

“Summerset” by Isabel Piazza

This decorative floral painting was done for Piazza’s industrial studio practices course that focuses on the business side of design. “We were instructed to work within a range of limitations. Bridging the gap between the classroom and the industry is essential” says Piazza.

“Rajah” by Isabel Piazza

“I transferred to FIT from a private university. I wanted to do something creative and needed to be in a smaller, close knit community,” says Piazza. “FIT is great for that. I enjoy the intimate class size and the opportunity to engage with your professors on a daily basis. It’s also great being in NYC where there are an unlimited amount of resources—going to fabric trade shows and museums has had a lot of influence on my work as a student.”

photos by Isabel Piazza

One Night Only! “Tempo” media design exhibition May 30!

By , May 29, 2013 2:32 pm

What kind of song and dance will it take to get you to the Media Design Club’s “Tempo” exhibition? Well we’re glad you asked.

Here is your video invite: (Note: The Communication Design Professor C.J. Yee character was not impressed with this, but you will be!) 

There will be food, a panel discussion, important people, and inspiration. Sorry for the short notice.

The Media Design Club’s “Tempo” exhibition is ONE NIGHT only. Catch it at: Helen Mills Event Space & Theater located: 137-139 West 26 Street, NYC.

Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6 p.m – 10 p.m. It’s free.

The art and design show, “Tempo,” explores the the relationship between time and visual communication.

 

Interior design grads providing “new memories”

By , May 15, 2013 3:51 pm

      “When you leave the space…it should give you a new concept, a new memory.”   Interior Design senior Minsoo Kim

Find out what your next music hall, brain research center, interactive cinema, special children’s hospital and boutique hotels will look like. From FIT’s interior designers of the future!

Plans for these and other projects were on view last Thursday and Friday in Pomerantz building conference rooms, where seniors spoke of their visions for buildings of the future.  

Minsoo Kim’s “Momentum Immersible Cinema”

“I think interior design is not just about function or a convenient space, but should provide a unique experience,” says Minsoo Kim, graduating ID student. “When you leave the space, not only should it have been comfortable and functional, but the space should give you a new concept, a new memory.”

 ”My project is a music hub with the purpose of bridging the gap between the artist and the fan,” said senior Amanda Hibbs. “The design intent was to make music tangible by applying elements that relate to both music and design.”

And then there was Sarah Hatch’s brain center project, which is naturally interactive.  ”The integration of design with technology can change the way spaces are perceived and the way we operate within them,” says Hatch. ”Spaces can operate for us, responding to our actions, and soon enough, maybe even our thoughts.”

Amanda Hibbs presenting music hub “Interlude” project

Recalling the past four years during which sleep was a “true luxury,” ID senior Hayley Park described the culmination of her studies:

“During the seventh semester we developed what’s called our design programs. It was for an envisioned facility of our choice in an existing building in the tri-state area.”

There were frequent all-nighters leading up to the presentations. “We had to write an approximately 150-page book describing our project, its purpose, justification, type of space, the facility required, and an analysis of the individuals who would be using it,” said Hayley. “For instance mine was a mission center to raise next generation missionaries. My building included educational facilities, a worship area and residential component.”

Hayley receiving the Decorator’s Club award

At the end of the 56 presentations, Hayley was “relieved it was over.” But ID chair Andrew Seifer said “It’s not over yet,” and began reading an award letter. “At first he thought it was a present for himself!” said Hayley.

It was an excellence award in the form of a white iPad from The Decorators Club,  a private interior design organization.  It was for Hayley!

“I was crying the whole time,” said Minsoo. “I was so impressed with her project. Every one was so into the spirituality of it”

Sarah Hatch rocking the house with her thesis project “NeoCortex”

Says Minsoo, “I want to start my career in New York and open my own interior architectural firm for commercial and retail spaces. I also want to do not just permanent space, but exhibition and public instillation interior design. The interactive event between people and their space is what interests me.” 

 Click here to read about Hayley’s Pave-winning men’s store

Photos:  Johannes Knoops 

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