Tag Archives: Introduction

Discovering a Major: Entrepreneurship

by Laura Vitarelli as told to Emily Bennett

Laura Vitarelli

Laura Vitarelli

I just recently decided what I wanted to do. Within the past two years I decided I wanted to become an esthetician, which is doing professional makeup, facials, peels, laser hair removal,  and other things related to skin care. I definitely want to try to start my own line of skincare and makeup products, which is why I chose Entrepreneurship as my major.

Many of the classes I take in Entrepreneurship revolve around fashion, which I am interested in as well. The program aims to address the real life demands of today’s marketplace. It is an option for students who want to become more impactful members of society, learn how to manage creativity, become more innovative in business, and learn how to build a sustainable enterprise.

The fact that FIT has a major dedicated to learning how to run a start-up was a huge factor in choosing the school. The admissions process was the same as anyone else applying to a major in the School of Business and Technology. I had to write an essay about why I was the perfect fit for this school, send transcripts and test scores. I didn’t have to show a portfolio or anything like the Art & Design students.

Currently, I am enrolled in the AAS Advertising and Marketing Communications program (Entrepreneurship is a Bachelor’s Degree program). I believe having both majors when I graduate from FIT will prepare me for being involved in today’s crazy marketplace and enhance my knowledge about the business world and how it works. So far, Computer Design has been my favorite class. Right now I am working on a portrait of Ariana Grande made solely of typed letters. It is really challenging and interesting. I visited the club fair last week, and WFIT, the campus broadcast club,  has me interested. And I am definitely going to join the Models and Stylists Association so that I can do makeup on people.

Even though it is only my first couple of months at FIT, the biggest lesson I have learned is to get out of your comfort zone. I think it is something everyone has to do in order to succeed and realize who they are.


To learn more about the Entrepreneurship major click here. And to find out about Advertising and Marketing Communications click here.

–Emily–

Pre-College Programs

If you just cannot wait to study at FIT, there are classes available to middle and high school students. The program is called Saturday Live (or Summer Live depending on what time of year it is). One of my friends, who is now at RISD, told me about the classes and I ended up taking  five different courses while I was in high school:

Manual Patternmaking and Sewing

Introduction to Fashion Design Industry

Creative Fabric Painting

Fashion Art for Fashion Designers

Fashion Art Portfolio

The classes would run from 9-12 and then 1-4 after lunch. I lived in Westchester so I did the morning Metronorth commute with all the parents who lived in my town. The classes were good for laying down the basics for the courses I would take when I got to college. They were fun and not very stressful, so we could take risks and not worry about failing. You do get graded in these courses, but the grades do not hold any college credit value and are therefore just meant to help you evaluate yourself.

While you certainly could never replace, say, the college level patternmaking couse with the one I took over the summer, the classes were a fantastic place to meet other fashion-focused kids my age, test the waters of various disciplines and evaluate my base skill levels.

I realized that I was set on going into fashion design in college, so I took classes specifically to improve my portfolio. Taking these classes certainly does not guarantee you will get into FIT, but actually working in the classrooms with real teachers from the college helps tremendously. I think it also gives a great sneak peak into what it would actually be like to go to FIT. My Fashion Art Portfolio teacher reviewed my portfolio before I sent it in with my application and then I ended up having her as my Fashion Art & Design professor second semester! She even recognized me on the first day of class. Now, they have even organized the classes into groups so you can see which to take in preparation for certain majors.

–Emily–

Influencers at FIT – Valerie Steele

Here at FIT we have a vast resource at our fingertips: the Museum at FIT (located below the Gladys Marcus library). In addition to the numerous exhibitions held every year, students also have access to the study collection where garments, accessories and textiles can be seen up close.  Valerie Steele is the curator of the Museum, a prolific fashion academic, and the editor of the journal Fashion Theory. I sat down with Ms. Steele to discuss her impressive history as well as the museum’s past and future:

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

This interview has been edited and condensed for publication


Since this interview is for the Admissions Blog, I wanted to ask you a little about your own education. What did you find most helpful about your university education?

Hmm…well, I’ve never been asked that before. I guess that the most important thing I learned, both as an undergraduate at Dartmouth and a graduate student at Yale, was how to do research–learning how to use primary research. I know when I used to teach in the graduate school here at FIT, that was something I pounded into the students, the difference between primary and secondary research. That was something I thought was especially important.

You said that while getting your PhD the study of fashion was really vilified. Being here in New York, which is one of the “big four” fashion capitals, and also being here at FIT one of the best design schools, it may seem like this has passed, but do you think there has actually been change outside of this bubble?

Well, I think fashion is much more accepted as a field of serious study. There are many more people around the world working on articles, books and exhibitions about fashion. On the other hand, there are still very few places that offer a doctorate in fashion studies. It is still very much an interdisciplinary field. So, if you want to go ahead and study fashion you still have to think, “Will I be in an art history department or history or cultural studies? Where can I find someplace to study that?”

And you never studied museum-ology or museum theory, so was it difficult to transition from academic writing to more creatively focused exhibitions?

It’s interesting you should ask that. My doctorate is in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, but I did every single class, except one, and my dissertation in the history of fashion. When I started teaching in the graduate school at FIT, it was in what was then the Museum Studies Costume and Textiles Department, now it is called Fashion and Textiles Studies: History, Theory and Museum Practice. So I was teaching fashion history, but within the framework of a museum studies program. Obviously it was exciting and new to actually be putting on exhibitions here. That was a big thrill. It is not that different from the kind of research you do for putting together a big article or a book. In fact, all my big exhibitions here are accompanied by a book as well, so it is the same kind of research procedure.

In that same vein, who do you see as the audience of the Museum at FIT, and how do you pique their interests?

Well, our audiences are multiple. Obviously the FIT community is one of our core audiences, and then people in fashion and design-related fields are another. A third is just the museum-going public, and that is very much an international public. So, we try to do shows that represent original research, but that are also accessible to people at all levels of sophistication. A lot of the FIT community or designers who come to shows really know a lot about fashion history and design so you have to give them more, extra in-depth things. But you also want to be accessible to people who walk in off the street. They might be anyone from a six-year-old to a grandma who might not know very much about fashion, but you have to intrigue them as well. That is the idea to try and present it in a way which is visually stimulating and exciting so that whether they know anything about the topic or if they bother to read anything, they can still get something out of the show.

I actually have noticed a lot of children when I am in the museum, and I am amazed they are not only interested, but they comment on stuff!

Oh they will! Absolutely! A colleague of mine brought her two-year-old son to the corset show, and she said he just sat down on the floor and gazed up at this Vivenne Westwood corset-dress. She thought it was wonderful, she said, “oh there he is fantasizing about the eternal feminine.”

What do you think the hardest part about developing a show is? Is it picking the topic or is it finding people to work with or…?

Oh, I don’t know if there is a “hardest” part. I think one of the challenges is actually getting your hands on the things you want to put in the show. You’ll do all kinds of research, and you’ll think, “Okay I want this dress, I want this dress…” but then you have to find out who owns that? And will they lend it to me? And how much will it cost to borrow it, how can I raise the money to borrow it? Et cetera, et cetera.

Well, that leads me into my next question. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute collection is the only one, at least in New York, that can even compare to the one at the Museum at FIT. So what is your relationship with them, do you borrow and lend a lot for shows?

We do borrow and lend with them. I wouldn’t say a lot, but every few shows they will borrow something from us or we will borrow from them. Two pieces in the dance exhibition are from the Met, and we’re lending I think four pieces to their China exhibition which will open in the Spring.

So it is only a few pieces then. I guess you both have such huge collections neither of you need to borrow anything.

Well, it is interesting, we will borrow back and forth for a few key pieces, and both of us have a pretty good idea of what is in the other collection. We also borrow and lend from the Museum of the City of New York, which also has a fantastic collection. Most of the older things, for example, if there is a 19th century thing, we will try and borrow from them. We also loaned to their Stephen Burrows show a year ago.

Oh yes, I saw that show and I have to admit I was a little surprised. I didn’t think the Museum of the City of New York had that much fashion, but I guess they do.

Oh, they do! They have a really wonderful fashion collection.

Is there one specific exhibit that sticks out in your mind as being particularly exciting or difficult or just interesting for you?

Well, a couple. I loved working on Gothic: Dark Glamour. That was the first time we did a really immersive mise-en- scène with a graveyard, a laboratory, and a ruined castle and things. That was great fun, and I think good preparation for upcoming shows like our fairy tale show, which we will do in 2016 that will similarly have dramatic mise-en-scènes. And then, of course, A Queer History of Fashion won us a lot of prizes, particularly for the work that we did both in reaching out to the LGBT community and doing media online. I think that was also good preparation for remembering to focus on diversity themes in all of our shows and also remembering to emphasize media media media! It is a great way to reach out to people. Even if they cannot come in the door of the exhibition, they can still get information and images online.

Who writes for Fashion Theory, which is your journal?

It is mostly curators and professors and graduate students.

So is it mostly people you have met? Or do people apply?

No, no it is a peer-reviewed journal which means that people send things in, and then I have to find one or two experts in their field who will peer review it and say whether or not it is good enough to go in, or absolutely not, or can it go in only if they make x, y, z changes. It is much more prestigious and important for scholars to be published in a peer-reviewed journal than just a regular magazine.

I just wanted to introduce the readers to the Couture Council, because I think a lot of people don’t even know that it exists. And to be honest, I don’ t know that much about it because there isn’t that much information available.

Yes, the Couture Council is a friends group, which many museums have. It is a membership group; members pay $1,000 a year and young members under 35 pay $350 a year. They can come to various events, and the money–their membership fees along with the awards luncheon–help fund exhibitions, public programs and acquisitions for the museum. We get some money from corporations and foundations, but the Couture Council is nice because it is reliable. No matter what our show is about, whether it is a kooky one that we can’t get any corporate sponsors to fund, or it is controversial in some way, we know the Couture Council is there to help support all our exhibitions and all our public programs.

Lastly, is there anything you would like to do professionally that you haven’t had the chance to do yet?

Well, of course, if you had your own television show, you could reach a bigger audience. I do a lot of [appearances on] TV shows, but I think there is a lot more that could be done. Now, of course, television is becoming a bit outdated, so you really have to think in terms of the world-wide web. We have a new department specifically focusing on media and new initiatives. Many of the videos shown in the lobby are on the YouTube page. On YouTube there’s a little of this and a little of that. Each of the fashion exhibitions has its own website and we’re increasingly doing videos for those.

Yes, I have used the exhibition websites for information for some class projects. They are done really beautifully. Well, thank you so much for sitting down with me. It was a pleasure talking to you!

Of course, with pleasure! Thank you, it was nice talking to you!

–Emily–

Have the best registration EVER

While many dread the planning and prep and stress of registration, I LOVE IT.  I love being able to schedule my life and know how my following semester is going to look.  I thrive on planning and organizing so registration is my Christmas.  While I have made a post on registration every time it rolls around, there are important points to reinforce and introduce (and who wants to dig through thousands of posts):

  1. Talk to your academic advisor
    Make an appointment with your academic advisor even if you know what classes you have to take.  It is comforting to have your schedule and courses solidified by those who know best.  Also, for those who don’t know, not all courses are available to all majors – including liberal arts.  Therefore, it is best to make an appointment before you register!  Here is the link to make an appointment: http://www.fitnyc.edu/13575.asp
  2. Plan Ahead
    Once you have the classes that you are planning on taking, make up your schedule.  Map out a tentative schedule and plan out your biggest/most important/longest classes first and revolve your classes around that.
  3. Write down the CRN codes
    The CRN codes are the first things that you can type in to register for all your classes.  If you have all the CRN codes for your classes, you type them in when it’s your registration time, hit submit and you’re all set. 
  4. Be flexible
    This one isn’t the easiest, especially for me.  Sometimes you won’t get the classes you want so you have to be prepared to move your schedule around.
  5. Don’t stress
    Registration is exciting because that means you are one semester closer to graduating. Keep your chin up and know that winter break is soon!

Ashley

Student ID Card

Hello there Newcomers,

As you start crossing out things from your Checklist for New Students, you will soon find out that you need a student ID Card to access any FIT Building. FIT is obsessed with security (and I mean it) and in order to enter campus buildings your ID cards must be clearly (and I mean in the security guards face) for them to let you in. tumblr_inline_mkm1lltt4x1qz4rgpParents sure do love this top-notch security, but as I (repeatedly say on my tours) it gets annoying for us students. Anyways I’m not here for that, you will notice that on your own haha.

Your photo ID cards are issued at the beginning of every semester (usually during orientation they have a set schedule for you) or if you are smart enough and live near FIT you can just show up on campus now with proof of registration (this means your Fall 2014 schedule, which can be printed at the Registration Center, Business & Liberal Arts Center Room B103 for FREE) and avoid lines. These ID cards identify you as members of the FIT community  (so remember to give us your best smile) and can be great conversation starters at any cafe, or the subway and even in different countries (FIT is world-renowned). Every semester after you need to get your ID card validated with a colorful sticker that you obtain from Campus Security during registration (you need a valid class schedule, same process as the beginning).unnamedTo get your ID card you (by now know you need your schedule) must bring identification to the Photo Id Center located in in room D-404 (the D building is Pomeranz Center located on the corner of 27th Street and 7th Avenue). They are open Mondays-Fridays from 10am – 9pm and Saturdays from 10am – 5pm. Some of these times might vary during holidays so please go ahead and contact the Photo ID Center: fitcard@fitnyc.edu – 212 217-7777, just to double-check. Oh, and before I forget, administrative offices are closed from Friday-Sunday during the summer (this means you wont be able to get your schedule printed out).4b690fa88258a84567c3c484f140997bd8379578430ecaa00307e78e6a030ae1Since I saved the best for last, I think you should now every visitor is required to enter campus via the Marvin Feldman Center lobby. They will then be required to show a photo ID to security in order to obtain a visitor’s pass. If by now you are thinking argh so tedious, keep in mind all this is just to keep you safe and sound. tumblr_lq8l7ydnS81qlw0qxo3_400BTW, just in case you have cool parents (mom in my case) if they would like to sit in for one of your classes, just have your professor write-up a letter and take it to security when you go get their visitors pass.

Summer is almost over, remember CARPE DIEM!

Sadie

PS: Don’t lose it, or you’ll have to pay for a new one (why, GOD, WHY?!)

3a2cdf5394269e7248402e442eca2b24f35f2036a590ad73a23c4ce9cd81c7b1

Plan the Perfect Semester

Anything you say or do may be used against you in a court of law.

If questioned twice, I will deny this post ever existed (something along the lines of identity theft). Bearing that in mind I will proceed to share my secrets with you (hahaha).

Ciao incoming students,

As you plan out your first semester (and swear you are about to die, so stressed out) there are some things that have come in handy through the years when it comes to registering and choosing classes.

  1. You will be assigned a faculty adviser according to your last name, you can and you should email this person as soon as you receive the email. Later on, you will find out that you like a certain teacher better and you can request to change :). I got snowed in during my first week, so I had to assign myself my own adviser which turned out to be wonderful, because I chose someone who fit (no pun intended, well maybe a bit) me.
  2. Search for your curriculum at the FIT website. Home –> Academics–> Undergraduate Programs–> Fashion Merchandising Management–> Curriculum. This will help you have an idea of what the next two years of your life will look like. Minimum credits for a full-time student: 12, max credits per semester: 21.Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 6.18.17 PM
  3. Who doesn’t like ending the semester as early as possible to enjoy Xmas back with the family or just to explore NYC better (you nodding your head, pay attention NOW, will not regret)? As much as I love FIT, I am a metal to a magnet, I can feel the stronger pull to return back home early (long distance relationship, love of my life, target acquired) so I plan things to end early December. How? Well, (refer to the top quote haha) you look up the semester calendar. Look at what day is the last day, this fall the classes to end up the latest are Friday (sometimes can be Monday) classes, which means I plan my whole semester around NOT taking Friday classes (perks: long weekends, every weekend). Semester Calendar fall 2014
  4. Log in to MyFIT before your assigned date and time and look up at courses (use class search), days, time slots, availability and professor if noted (ratemyprofessor them). Create two mock schedules by u in excel and write down the CRN (course reference number, duh right :P), this will make registering a one minute deal. You will log in, click on student tab, under online resources click Registration, choose semester, copy paste your CRN’s and done.Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 6.29.54 PM
  5. Check out what your major has to offer, I know International Trade & Marketing offers advisement tracks, where they suggest what courses you should take, depending on what your dream job is. Don’t be afraid to click around the website, or Google what you want to do after graduation (I know it seems far out and away, but better not let it take you by surprise).Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 6.33.59 PM
  6. Make an appointment with our (well now yours too, CONGRATS) Academic Advisement Center, they are happy to meet with you in person, online, or via telephone (convenient, yes!). They want to make your “academic experience as smooth and rewarding as possible” if that is not enough for you, at their front desk there is always free candy (no questions or comments just ransack the bowl haha).

Welcome to the beginning of an amazing chapter in your life! You will not regret this decision, so many doors will be opened for you that you will look back in hindsight and laugh at yourself ever even considering other options. Below, a peek into your great future: Greatness joke

Carpe Diem,

Sadie

All work No play

Hi again everyone! So on Saturday I was asked to show more of my work now from a lot of people, mostly students. I can’t show too much because well professors don’t like that for the classes and I can’t have anyone steeling my brilliant ideas! SO every once in a while you will get a backstage pass to ” a life of an interior design student at FIT” ( That’s right I am an interior design student and I am alive haha).

hhThis first image is a quick idea I did on Revit. For those of you who don’t know what Revit is, it’s a 3D design program made by the same producers of AUTOCAD, both these programs work hand in hand. You will learn AUTOCAD your second semester and REVIT your third, so before that it’s all by hand.

 

unnamedThis is a perspective drawing, you will learn this in your second semester. perspectives are 3D drawings focusing on two or more walls. To make these drawings you will take your drafting equipment and two vanishing points…. I can’t tell you that much :) You will have to wait to take the class. P.S every teacher switches there plans, so it may look similar to things I may post on here, but trust me it’s not so nothing can be copied here and that’s the only reason I am posting it.

I hope you enjoyed your little sneak peek, now it’s time to get back to work for me!

Xoxo,

Kailee

 

First Week Back

Wow!  What a stressful week it has been here at FIT.  The first week of the semester has just concluded and my goodness am I tired.  At the beginning of the week, I was terrified.  I had no idea what to expect for my second semester.  As much as ratemyprofessor.com is useful, you never really know what the class and the professor are going to be like.  With very little sleep, I survived the first week back.  I am excited to really get back into the swing of things and get comfortable with my schedule and daily routine again.  I’ve already met some really awesome people in my classes and I’ve already learned so much.  If you are an incoming freshman to FIT or any university, just know that it is 100% normal to be nervous about starting a new semester.  It’s like starting a new school year.  It’s terrifying, but exciting, but nerve-racking.  I actually have 2 evening classes this semester, so there will definitely be a post in the future about how to stay awake for your evening classes!  All I can say is that it was an incredibly stressful week with not knowing what to expect, but we all made it through…and now sleep is much needed.

xx,
Ashley

First week fair (Part two)

There were so many great tables at the first week fair I couldn’t possibly fit them all in one post, so here is some more!

cvThe department of student life, they are always at the best things going on at FIT. This time they had a raffle going on!

k studyFIT’s study abroad program! All of the programs are listed there is you want to find out anymore information you can go to FITNYC.edu/studyabroad

tachTech Help! Having a problem with your computer? the internet? angel? Go visit them in the C building- room c307a. There hours are Mon- Friday, 8:30-10pm. You can call them also at 212.217.HELP or email them at techhelp@fitnyc.edu

syThe student association, such amazing people, vibrant and so much fun!

sustainabilty councilThe sustainability council at FIT. The eighth annual sustainable business and design conference people, planet, and prosperity: Measuring Our Impact. This will take place on April 8th from 8:30am to 5:30pm. More information will be posted at fitnyc.edu/sustainabilityconfence.

resResidential Life department, always have the best give aways at FIT events.

athFIT athletics and recreation. Keep in mind any events that you may attend at FIT you must have your FIT ID and proper attire.

fitableThe office of FITABLE- the office of disability services at FIT is available to help everyone and anyone no matter what!divJoin FIT diversity council!

There was so much to see and do at the first week fair, any events on campus that are coming up I highly suggest you take time out of your busy schedule to go! You may even bump into me!:)

Xoxo Kailee

 

Applications are Due – 1 WEEK!

It’s the final countdown!  Applications are due 1 week from today – February 1st!

If you are a little confused about the application process, go to http://fitnyc.edu/2862.asp for extensive information about the process.  While I could just copy and paste all of that information into this blogpost, I don’t think that would be anymore helpful than the link itself.

My biggest advice for post-application nervousness is knowing that whatever happens happens.  There is nothing that you can do prior to receiving your letter from FIT about their decision so now is the time to have fun and explore.  Don’t sit in your house all day, staring at your phone or your computer screen waiting for an email to come to your inbox.  It will take time.  If you do not get into FIT, know that you can always transfer and reapply for another semester if you are unhappy with your college path.  Everything happens for a reason.  Put in a lot of hard work and dedicate yourself to what you really love.  If you love what you do.  You will be happy.

xx,
Ashley