Tag Archives: fashion

It’s Senior Showtime!

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There is less than one month left in the school year, so it’s that time again; the time when all the graduating students work is put on display. It can catch some people off guard as the displays go up intermittently around the school, and as everyone is so focused on finishing up their own projects, but when you finally stop to look at all of them it is really inspiring. Over 800 students are represented from both the AAS and BFA programs. To see where each major will be located click here! Just another reason to come to FIT to check out the school.

The AAS Photography display in the main lobby of Feldman center

The AAS Photography display in the main lobby of the Feldman center

Most Art & Design majors have their work displayed throughout the school as well as a “senior show” where industry professionals along with friends and family can see a collection of work that was created over our time here.

The AAS Fashion Design (apparel) presentation (from when I graduated)

The AAS Fashion Design (apparel) presentation (from when I graduated in 2013)

The AAS Fashion Design (illustration) presentation (from when I graduated in 2013)

The AAS Fashion Design (illustration) presentation (from when I graduated in 2013)

The most famous “senior show” is the bachelor’s Fashion Design show. It is attended by lots of influential industry people, as well as the designer critics who worked with all of the students. This year’s is happening this Thursday (4/30/15) and can be livestreamed! I saw the presentation of all the work in the Great Hall a few weeks ago, and couldn’t be more proud of my peers who did the AAS with me! Definitely watch the show to see the critics and people’s choice winners work the runway.

The "wall" as it's called in Fabric Styling

The “wall” as it’s called in Fabric Styling

My major (Fabric Styling) has one wall that the entire major works together to create. It’s a huge undertaking, but is a nice way to show the work of the entire group as one piece. We also have a senior show coming up (along with the Textile/Surface Design kids) where we each get a table to display our portfolios and any other work we have done. I’m hoping lots of people show up!

The Packaging Design Presentation in the lobby of the Goodman Center/Gladys Marcus Library

The Packaging Design Presentation in the lobby of the Goodman Center/Gladys Marcus Library

The Junior show for Graphic Design is on May 14, 2015 in the Katie Murphy Amphitheater (5pm-9)

The Junior show for Graphic Design is on May 14, 2015 in the Katie Murphy Amphitheater (5pm-9)


Internships: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Everybody seems to have an opinion on internships. Are they necessary for “real world” learning? Is it just free labor? Do you actually learn anything worth while?

My opinion has certainly changed since starting at FIT. On the one hand, internships are necessary for the “real world” experience of working with a team, in an office and reporting to people above you. Almost any successful professional will tell you that working under someone is necessary, and you should do it even if it is unpaid. This is where it gets a little complicated.

On the one hand, internships offer (hopefully) invaluable experience, networking opportunities, helpful references, business insight and something to put on your resume. There is no doubt that employers want experience. It can also guide you in deciding what you actually want to do when you graduate. Even if you are absolutely positive you are going to be in advertising, do you want to work for a big company or a small company? An exciting but risky start-up, or a stable respected company where you will have much less responsibility or creative freedom? Are you sure the job you think you want is actually fulfilling?

However, many people now believe that internships are detrimental to students. They certainly take up a lot of time with most companies wanting at least two full days a week. It is also hard to quantify how much someone is learning at an internship. Are you just getting coffee, making copies and running things back and forth, or is your supervisor taking the time to make sure you understand what you are doing and, most importantly, why it is important? Most internships are unpaid, which brings up the argument that internships really only benefit middle to upper class kids who can afford to work for free. If a student is paying their own way through college it is unlikely they will have time for school, their job and an unpaid internship.

Of course, most places try to get around this now with “credit bearing” internships. These are also usually unpaid, but the student can get credit for a class. This allows the school to check up on the work place to ensure it is safe, and that the student is getting enough of an education to make the time spent there worth it. However, these credit-bearing internships are not offered by every company and usually require the student to add  another class to their schedule. This limits the flexibility of their schedule for other classes and obviously takes away more time.

If I may interject with my own opinion here, I do think internships are necessary. The ones I did have certainly helped me see what jobs I thought I was interested in more clearly. I have been exposed to big companies, little companies and growing companies. I have learned a lot and made many helpful connections. However, I have never been paid for my work. I have never even been compensated for lunch or travel. Looking back now, it is very frustrating as well as quite disheartening considering I am looking for a job and having done all this work is not  a guarantee I will get hired. I met a woman recently and asked her if she would ever need a research assistant. She replied that she would love an assistant, but could not afford to pay fair compensation at the moment, and did not feel it was right to accept that labor for free. Even though it was an opportunity I could not have, I was so happy when she said that! I mean it was so refreshing just to hear someone say, “I can’t hire you, but I respect you, your work, and your time too much to let you work for nothing.”

What are your opinions? Have you had any good or bad experiences with internships?


Blush Magazine – Spring Issue

For all of you that may or may not know, I am a part of Blush Magazine, the beauty and fashion magazine here at FIT as the Senior Photo Editor.  Our brand new Spring issue comes out this week on newsstands here at FIT.  Be sure to pick up a copy before they are gone!  Everyone on the Blush Magazine team works really hard to put out a really strong and beautiful issue.  We are completely student run from the articles to the photo shoots to the layout and more.  If you want to join Blush Magazine, we meet on Tuesday’s (not every week) in B736 during common hour.  We are having a meeting tomorrow, 3/24 for planning for our summer issue!  If you miss this meeting, email blush_magazine@fitnyc.edu to find out information for our future meetings.  Below is a sneak preview of our fashion editorial shoot for this spring issue!

Tips for High School Students

  1. Take AP classes

If your school offers them and your schedule allows, Advanced Placement classes can really free up time in your schedule when you get to college (IF the school accepts them, definitely worth it to check first)

2. Take an Art History course

Here at FIT everyone has to take at least one Art History course for the general education requirements. It’s pretty helpful considering this is by and large an art school, even for the business kids. However, having general knowledge of art can be helpful in understanding concepts in history, sociology and even science  and math! (Ever hear of the golden ratio??) Also, if you take this as an AP and the credits transfer you can get out of this requirement (see above)

3. Apply early

4. Enjoy the summer!

It’s not like summers post college won’t be fun, but right now you have very few responsibilities compared to your future so revel in it baby!

5. Get to know the area around FIT

If it’s possible, you might want to come to 27th Street and scope out the area, find a few food places, see how far the walk to the grocery store is, start making a mental list of cool places you want to visit, etc.

6. If you will be commuting, do a test run day so you know where you’re going

You really don’t want your first day of class to be when you realize the walk from the subway to the school takes fifteen minutes longer than you thought. Trust me, you will be stressed out enough on your first day, and knowing where you’re going will make everything easier. Also, the other people on their way to work won’t hate you for getting in their way.

7. Do creative stuff!

Even though many of your classes and projects will force you to be creative, there will be a lot of stress and guidelines. If you have any personal projects you want to work on do it now while you have the time!

8. Keep up with cultural events around your area/the world

9. Talk to other people starting FIT on Facebook or social media

10. Get to know your roommate(s) and plan what you’re bringing

You really don’t want to end up with three microwaves and no dishes.

11. Talk to people in the industry in your area (boutique owners, FIT alumni, artists, etc.)

People are busy, but if you are respectful of their time everyone loves talking to the next generation of artists!

12. If you’re going to be an Art & Design student consider getting the Adobe Suite

Most of the Art & Design majors will require you to take classes in Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign as well as use them independently in projects. Look at what classes you will be taking in your major and see what Adobe is offering (student pricing!) to decide what would be best for your needs.

13. Immerse yourself in culture (movies, books, paintings, etc.) because you will be expected to be able to reference things for projects

14. Save up some money

 NYC is expensive man.

Do you guys have any tips you want to share?


First Apartment Checklist

So since we do go to school in New York City a lot of students get apartments instead of dorming, to feel a little more at home. But there are a lot of things everyone forgets in all the excitement.

The absolute number one thing you must know is what is included in your lease. Will cable be provided? Is water and heating included? How long is your lease? Maybe you can even get a better price if you sign the lease for a longer period of time.

So number one: Know the people you will be living with! you need them to be responsible, they need to pay the rent on time and someone who wont back out on you causing you to break the lease. Be aware of things that could go wrong, your security deposit could be used to fix anything you guys break.

Know your rights. Whenever you get an apartment , look into the handbook that each state has with the rights you are entitled to. Say something is broken like your heat , do they fix it or do you? how long are they aloud to go without fixing it, ect.

Just in case you have to leave, before packing up ask about what happens if you do in fact break your lease. This actually just happened to one of my good friends at school and it didn’t end nicely. Her roommate was sketchy to begin with , and I warned her to be careful.

Lastly don’t be afraid to ask questions, a lease is a legal contract and you are accountable for anything that happens.


Happy hunting,