Tag Archives: dorming

Perks of Kaufman Hall

Hi everyone and welcome back to a brand new school year at FIT!  If you’ve been keeping up with the blog since day 1, welcome back!  If you are just joining us, welcome to the family!  Some of you may know that last year I was in Nagler Hall on 27th St.  This year, as a sophomore I chose to go to Kaufman Hall over getting an apartment.  You truly cannot compare Nagler to Kaufman because they are worlds away from one another but Nagler made me truly appreciate what Kaufman has to offer.

Besides Kaufman being only a few blocks away, the view regardless of what floor or side you face is really nice, especially with the light coming through the windows in the morning (Ideal photographic lighting).  The dorms in Kaufman are HUGE and I mean HUGE.  Not just NYC huge, actually real life, middle of no where huge.  Each dorm room varies in square footage so freshmen, be sure to ask someone who lives in the dorms for a tour before you pick which floor/room you want.

The dorms are air conditioned, they are safe, there are tons of washers and dryers, AND THERE’S A KITCHEN IN EACH ROOM (Alumni and Nagler people rejoice).  The list goes on and on.  Let me know if you have any questions about Kaufman in the comments below!

Dorm Views from Kaufman

Dorm Views from Kaufman

Ashley

Are You There Housing Gods? It’s Me, Emily.

I’d like to say that the stress that comes from trying to figure out housing goes away after freshmen year, alas I cannot. Finding a place to live is always complicated, especially in New York City. Basically you have three options:

1. Live at Home

If you, like many FIT students, live in the tri-state area, it is probably possible for you to commute to school everyday using the Metro North, LIRR or Subway. The biggest pro of this is free housing (assuming your parents are not going to charge you rent). That is huge when considering the high price of rent in the city, and dorming isn’t exactly cheap. However, living at home has its downsides. First of all, most people want to feel like they are getting away and starting their own life at college. Living at home doesn’t really create this type of fulfillment and may detract from learning to live on your own, i.e. cooking for yourself, cleaning up after yourself, doing laundry, etc. Also, commuting is extremely tiring. I interned and did one class over the winterim session one year and I would get home around 7 or 8 pm and just crash. Sometimes I wouldn’t even eat dinner I was so tired. The commute doesn’t even have to be that long, just the stress, and dealing with other stressed travelers, can really take it out of you. Finding time for a social life is demanding as well. You can’t just walk down the hall, or decide to meet down the block if you are living an hour away. In terms of stuff, FIT offers lockers to rent for $10. These are reserved for commuter students, although they go quickly, so get one asap. To be honest, I’ve never had a locker so I cannot say whether or not they are big enough for all the stuff every major has. Trust me, everyone has so much stuff at FIT.

2. Finding an Apartment

I’m going to be honest, I have never looked for an apartment before, but I’m terrified of it. I am hoping to start looking when I get home from Italy, and it all is very overwhelming. Apartments in New York are small, expensive and hard to come by. I wish I could give advice on this subject, but instead I’ll just have to ask for some! As soon as I start the process I will definitely let you know what I find. *Gulp*

3. Dorming

This is where I have my expertise. I have dormed for three years at FIT (except for here in Italy) and there are definitely pros and cons. There are four different dorms. Alumni, CoEd and Nagler are reserved (for the most part) for freshmen. Kaufman, the biggest, is mostly upper classmen. Generally the biggest pro of living in the dorms is how close it is to the school. It takes about three minutes from bedroom to classroom at any of the 27th Street (freshmen) dorms and about ten minutes from Kaufman. All the dorms also have laundry machines in the building, which is a rarity in NYC, and Kaufman has a (small) gym. Each building has a workroom which can be convenient for finding a space to work on projects without going into a room at the school. Alumni and Kaufman both have kitchens in the room, and therefore do not require meal plans. The biggest complaint for all dorms is overnight visitation. There are many steps for requesting an overnight guest and most students are fed up with it by the end of the first semester. The dorms are also very strict about alcohol as FIT is a dry campus, even if you are 21. Many students prefer Kaufman because it has newer facilities and is slightly more spacious (or at least seems that way because of the extremely high ceilings). Dorming is pretty much a toss up for pros and cons, but as a senior I am definitely hoping to move out on my own. Fingers crossed, I can find a place.

For any more specific information on the dorms I can answer any of your questions in the comments!

–Emily–

My Dorm

Ciao ladies and gents,

Sorry I’ve been away (partly not that sorry, was having too much fun) , I had an amazing Spring Break in Belgium where I got to visit my friends and family from when I studied there in 2009. Now, I’m back to the real life (yeah, like living in Rome and traveling every weekend is the REAL life) and it’s time I catch up with you guys :)

My definite question right now is: to dorm or not to dorm? I’ve been living in the Residential Halls for 3 years now and even though it has been awesome experience (with some annoying twists parfois), I feel the time to become independent is upon me. Meanwhile, when I’m apartment hunting, I realize all the perks living in the dorms has. Aside from it being PRIME real estate in Chelsea, it is so amazing to just be able to walk or scooter (like I do) and be there in 5-7 minutes.

Without any further ado, I have become famous once again (yeah, right) with my past dorm-room coming in at minute 4:15 (although that is not my door, oops)  in the new Kaufman Hall video tour. I’m the bed with the green lizard, and it’s my orange computer in the dining room table (with my mid-day break cooking show Mazola Academy), and the beautiful roses my boyfriend sent me.

Enjoy with caution (I’m already tempted to move back in) !

Deadline for Online Application: April 2, 2014

how to apply

Carpe Diem,

Sadie

Dorm Essentials – Nagler

The beautiful thing about being a first year student is that you get to live right across the street from all of the buildings.  Doesn’t sound that appealing?  If you live on 27th street, you get to wake up 10 minutes before class and you have all of the FIT resources within walking distance (Which seems like a very long distance right now because it’s freezing outside…).  If you plan on living in Nagler Hall on 27th St, the following are the much needed supplies to conquer the dorm life:

  1. Community Bathrooms = Towel/Robe to walk back to your room
  2. A fan!  Unfortunately you cannot have a window fan, but I highly, highly recommend getting a fan to conquer the fluctuating temperature in your dorm room.  My fan is currently on full blast and it’s 32 degrees outside.  If you have the side by the window, prepare for hot and cold…i.e. the window chill and the heater.
  3. Microwavable food for those days where you aren’t feeling the dining hall or a midnight dinner.  You can’t have a microwave, fridge, toaster, or hot plate in your dorm, but you have access to a microwave in the first floor lounge and a fridge in your floors laundry room.
  4. A big laundry bag.  This applies to all dorms, but there are going to be some weeks where you just don’t want to do your laundry and it piles up quickly.  In order to keep your room free of clothes all over the floor and easy accessibility when taking your laundry from your room to the laundry room…get a laundry bag.
  5. Various types of shoes.  You need your shower shoes, your “I’m going to go down to the lounge” shoes, the “I’m going to go get frozen yogurt from Yogurtland and I’m wearing pajamas and I hope I don’t see anyone that I know” shoes.  In some cases, the shoes can be interchangeable but it’s better to be safe than sorry.  :)

xx,
Ashley

Living with an RA

Whenever I mention to someone that I live with an RA (Residential Assistant), they usually respond with, “oohh…cool…” I’m gonna let everyone in on a little secret: the RA rooms (in Kaufman at least) are the biggest. There is a large triple connected to a large dining and kitchen area, a bathroom and a single (for the RA). This is my second semester living with an RA, and it is pretty great. The extra room is really nice and I always thought it was weird to have the kitchen right next to where I sleep when I lived in a traditional double. Also, the RAs can answer any questions you have about housing; it is their job after all! I personally never wanted to be an RA, but living with them let me reap some of the benefits of the job without actually having any of their responsibilities. Obviously, the biggest concern most people have about living with an RA is that they won’t have any fun. First of all, the same rules apply to the RA room as the rest of the building, so you will have to complete roommate agreements, you can have visitors just like anyone else, etc. My advice would be to room with someone you are friendly with. You don’t have to be best friends, but I would suggest living with someone you already know you can get along with, and someone you won’t be to afraid to ask to wash their dishes if need be. The first RA I lived with was a girl I was friendly with in a fashion design class, and two girls who were recommended to me through other friends lived in the triple with me. It was by far the best roommate situation I have experienced thus far. Rooming with anyone is a leap of faith, but the best advice I can give is go for it with people you are friendly with, but maybe not best friends with, or recommendations from people you trust. Don’t be afraid to take the leap with an RA, if nothing else, you will probably have the nicest room in the building.

–Emily–

p.s. If you have any interest in becoming an RA, learn more about the job here