Tag Archives: advice

Yes, It Was My Way

 Yesterday I took my last final ever. It was probably my last day of school ever as well. It’s kind of crazy how fast college has gone by, and a little scary to think about such a huge change. However, I am happy with my four years here. These mixed feelings are hard to sum up, so I’ll just let Frank help me explain (yes, it’s cheesy, but just be glad I’m not using the “as we go on, we remember all the times we had together” song):

 

I’ve lived a life that’s full. I’ve traveled each and every highway; And more, much more than this, I did it my way

I think the most important aspect of my college career was that I tried everything I could and got to experience as much as possible. Salsa club, film critique, tennis, study abroad in Italy, walking the Camino de Santiago, fashion design, fabric styling, field biology, french conversation in Paris, the list can go on. This allowed me to meet so many interesting, lovely people and become excited about things I otherwise would not have even known about.

Regrets, I’ve had a few; But then again, too few to mention. I did what I had to do, and saw it through without exemption

I think people are most successful when they put their all into something, whether it be a project or an outfit. Sure, there may be some failures along your road, but I’ve heard some of the most accomplished people say they were not successful until they had their first huge failure. Failure is not something to be ashamed of, as long as you didn’t go down passively. If you’re going to fail, fail with all your might.

Yes, there were times, I’m sure you knew, when I bit off more than I could chew. But through it all, when there was doubt,  I ate it up and spit it out. I faced it all and I stood tall;  And did it my way

Personally, I viewed my biggest “failure” as when I realized I couldn’t keep doing the Fashion Design program, and that what I grew up thinking was my future was in reality not going to happen. At the time it seemed like the end of everything – my ambition, my dreams and goals – however, looking back now I am glad I switched out of Fashion Design. It was too much stress for me and I cannot imagine where I would be now mentally if I had stayed on. Deciding to switch majors was one of the hardest choices I had to make so far, but I’m glad I continued to my Bachelor’s and found a new path.

I’ve loved, I’ve laughed and cried. I’ve had my fill; my share of losing. And now, as tears subside, I find it all so amusing

FIT has certainly brought me a fair share of laughter and tears. I have made some of the craziest, silliest, best friends in the world over the past four years, and done some ridiculous and completely unforgettable things. On the flip side, if you ask my mom, I’m sure she could regale you with stories of late night crying phone calls and exasperated, endless discussions about my future, but looking back now it’s hard to remember those bad times. I would say don’t stress so much about making decisions and going crazy over little upsets, but it is hard to realize that in the moment.

For what is a man, what has he got? If not himself, then he has naught. To say the things he truly feels; And not the words of one who kneels. The record shows I took the blows – And did it my way!

You just have to do work that you can be proud of, and put your all into it. There are going to be obstacles and mistakes along your journey, I can guarantee it, so don’t worry about if it is going to happen, just know it is so important to not let those hardships stop you. And don’t be afraid of change, because change is not the end, it is not failing.

If you are a graduating senior in high school or college, I hope you feel as fulfilled as I do as you look back on your time thus far. And if you are facing a new chapter in your life, I hope my cheesy quote-advice will help reassure you as you begin a new path on your adventure.

 Thank you so much for reading my posts for the past two years!

–Emily–

Professor Beware

Having a good professor can make or break a class. There are certainly a range here at FIT, as anywhere else. I have found most of my professors as extremely helpful, knowledgeable, and interesting. I will admit to checking sites like ratemyprofessor.com as soon as teachers were announced, and I’m sure you will too.

However, you have to be careful with websites like this. First of all, ratings are not necessarily the best indicator of what a teacher will really be like. Many times people just use rating sites to complain when they did not get along with a professor, or feel like they were not being treated fairly whether it is true or not. Hopefully the teacher will have many reviews and you can judge for yourself if they seem reliable.

I think feedback for the professors and the school is a great tool if said feedback is honest and sincere, and I encourage students to rate their teachers (fairly, of course). I just went back and rated every teacher I had for my bachelors degree. That being said, these comments are not guarantees and I have often found my experience with a teacher to be completely opposite of what most people wrote, for better or worse.

Do you use ratemyprofessor.com or other sites like it? What experiences have you had with them?

–Emily–

Moving…What to do

So I have officially moved into an apartment.  I will not lie and I must say that moving was one of the most stressful experiences throughout my college term thus far.  You will think that you don’t have a lot of stuff, but you will immediately question if you are a hoarder while you are packing.

  • I highly recommend keeping a stash of boxes that you’ve accumulated.  I held onto the boxes that I used to move in this past summer which made it incredibly easy for me to pack up before anyone got there to help me.
  • Look at furniture before you approach IKEA.  The initial IKEA trip is a massive feat.  Look at the furniture that you’re interested in online and print out the information for that furniture.  You’ll be able to better recognize the furniture in store to see if you really like it, rather than looking around for hours (the options are endless).  Also, if you know what you want, you can always ask a trusty, IKEA employee (always willing to help)!
  • Bring a dolly!  I don’t know what I would have done without a dolly.  It truly saved my life and my sanity, as well as my parents who helped me move in and out.  You don’t think you’ll need it, but you will.
  • Bed Bath & Beyond will be your best friend.  They are the more convenient IKEA for purchasing smaller things such as a shower caddy, bath mat, etc.
  • Stock up on toilet paper and paper towel if you can.  If you have the space for it, see if someone can bring you a Costco portion size of these items.  It’ll save you the monthly trip to the nearest Duane Reade where 4 rolls of toilet paper will be anywhere from $5-6.  You could be spending those $6 on better things like….frozen yogurt (treat yourself).

Best of luck!
Ashley

#Nepal

Hey everyone,

Nepal_donation

With all the devastating occurs happening all around the world recently one that hasn’t been publicized as much as the Baltimore riots but should be is the earthquake that affected the people in Nepal. You may have seen it on Facebook recently that you can donate to the people there. Did you realize a lot of our students and staff at FIT are affected by this tragic event?

Coming from a small town in New Jersey you don’t always realize how many different people from all over the world you surround yourself with everyday when you are at FIT. More and more i have been noticing this walking through the hallways, sometimes you become so wrapped up in your own situation you forget that the people around you may be hurting.
So in the upcoming days i would like you to take a minute and think of a way you could help. It could be the smallest gesture by just saying a prayer or donating a dollar to the relief fund, or even giving someone who you see often in class some kind words of encouragement.

As for me i will be donating to UNICEF who vow to help the children of Nepal before, during an after this crisis.

“A devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake near Nepal’s capital city of Kathmandu has claimed more than 5,000 lives, caused thousands of injuries, and destroyed homes and infrastructure. Some 1.7 million children require humanitarian assistance, and UNICEF is on the ground working to provide critical aid to children and families.” You can donate today too! Just follow my link below.

https://www.unicefusa.org/donate/nepal-earthquake-help-children-now/24226?ms=sem_dig_2015_misc_20150425_google&initialms=sem_dig_2015_misc_20150425_google&gclid=COroycGWn8UCFWoV7AodpS8An

#helpnepal

Kailee

#pledgepurple

 

pledge purp

Hi everyone,

I hope you’re enjoying this lovely weather and you got to enjoy all the fun stuff in the breezeway for pledge purple today. What is pledge purple you may ask? It is FIT as a community standing up and saying no to domestic violence, that you are not alone!

pledge

For me pledge purple was a very touchy subject,  I myself have been a victim of sexual harassment and for the longest time I was scared to admit it. I was scared people would think it was my fault that i let it get to that point. But when i said stop they didn’t listen and when it continued to happen and i said stop i knew something just wasn’t right.  Did you know that  1 in 3 women are victims of interpersonal violence? or how about nearly 80% ….yes i said 80%, of females reported experiencing a least one incident of physical or sexual aggression by the end of college? Its all around us and sometimes what seems to be a joke can turn out to be so much more then that.

There are so many cases of domestic violence not just with women or college students it happens to men to and to the men reading this if this is happening to you , you are not alone. An abusive wife or partner may hit, kick, bite, punch, spit, throw things or destroy your possessions. To make up for any difference in strength , but of course domestic abuse doesn’t haven’t to be just violent it could also be verbal abuse. They may belittle you or humiliate you in front of your friends, colleagues, or family. Be possessive, act jealous, ,make false allegation about you to the people around you. All these are also signs of abuse or domestic violence.

plede If it makes you feel uncomfortable then you dont have to be nice and play it off, you say no. If they dont stop when you say no , you find someone to help you. Talk to a counselor , go online find the nearest group you can go to talk about your problems, go to the police, you have so many options all around you! Dont ever let it get to that point!

To learn more you can go to www.nyc.gov/domesticviolence

pledge p] So thanks to these lovely people i will wear my shirt with pride and i will take my stance against domestic violence! So as of this very moment  today…

I pledge:

to RECOGNIZE that non-consensual sex is sexual assault.

to IDENTIFY situations in which sexual assault may occur.

to INTERVENE in situations where consent has not or can not be given.

to CREATE an environment in which sexual assault is unacceptable and survivors are supported.

This is my pledge , i hope you will join me and the many others that pledged today! Dont forget to tag #FITPLEDGEPURPLE and #Admissionsblog to help promote our wonderful event today on instagram, facebook and twitter.  We would love to know you were there!

XOXO
Kailee

 

Discovering a Major: Packaging Design

by Claudia Arisso as told to Emily Bennett

Claudia Arisso

Claudia Arisso

I came to FIT really interested in Packaging Design! You do have to begin with the Communication Design AAS, so there were still two years for me to make a sound decision, apply, and get accepted into the BFA program. Communication Design prepared me for Packaging because the 4th semester is all about taking introductory courses to things like advertising, packaging, and exhibition design so that you have a better understanding of which BFA you’d like to continue into. For instance, Packaging is so different from the more commonly known Graphic Design major. Packaging deals extensively with crafting a brand from the ground up. You need to create a story and a reason for the consumers to fall in love with a product. Our classes revolve around brand strategy, creative briefs, and creating brand stories. (It’s all about depth!)

This is a work in progress of a flexible packaging project for an international food brand

This is a work in progress of a flexible packaging project for an international food brand

As specific as Packaging Design sounds, we come out with such a wide skill set because it requires you to wear many different hats, and grads can go into pretty diverse fields. For me, writing, research, and strategy are the aspects of Packaging that I want to take into my future career, whatever that may be.  So far I have done two internships. My first was working on page layouts, logos and identity for a design publication. This was strictly graphic design for print. My internship at the moment is for credit and is a required part of the Packaging Design curriculum. I work in a small packaging design studio that is more focused on brand strategy and how to get instant shelf impact. I have also picked up some freelance work along the way, but I wouldn’t necessarily recommend piling that on while you’re still in school.

I had to show a portfolio to be accepted into both my AAS and BFA. To get into Packaging, I just had to show my best work from the AAS program in addition to my GPA.

This was made for the Packplay competition for the University of Quebec and Montreal. The competition is between from schools all over the world (we are the only ones from the US!)

This was made for the Packplay competition for the University of Quebec and Montreal. The competition is between schools from all over the world (we are the only one from the US!)

Last semester, I took a Sustainable Packaging class that taught us how to make sustainability part of our design process, which is so important to anyone involved with making anything in 2015. Outside of Packaging, I’ve taken everything from Crime Scene Chemistry to Bookbinding. Picking a major doesn’t mean you have to pigeonhole yourself! I’m in a pretty specific major, but I learned that you can make it work with whatever talents or interests you have. Your major shouldn’t restrict you – use the aspects you love about it to your advantage and play up your strengths. The different BFA programs are really just different means to an end.


To learn more about the Packaging Design major click here! And to learn about the Communications AAS program click here!

–Emily–

Finishing an Internship. Now What?

As the semester comes to a close, many students, including myself are finishing off our semester long internships.  While this is my first internship through the school, I think there are a few standard requirements to say goodbye to your internship and leave on a good note.  Here’s my advice:

  1. Thank you note.  This is pretty standard, but it is important that you thank your supervisor(s) for giving you this opportunity.  A handwritten note given on the last day of your internship is always better than an email.  You don’t want to just leave without something physically tangible.  Whether your internship was amazing or not what you expected, you still learned what you liked and didn’t like.  You got something out of it, whether it was this grand wealth of knowledge or information to contribute to your future best-selling novel about internships.  Who knows?
  2. A gift.  While a thank you note is pretty much required, a gift is not.  It is though a very nice gesture to show your appreciation for your supervisor.  Whether you’re getting Baked by Melissa cupcakes for the whole department, our an individual Crumb’s cupcake, show your appreciation for your higher ups.
  3. A letter of recommendation and/or reference.  One of the most important things about an internship experience is what you learn and who you meet.  Having a letter of recommendation that you can bring to future interviews is a massive asset.  Ask your supervisor kindly for a letter of recommendation when you leave your internship rather than 6 months down the road and 24 hours before your interview.  The same goes with a reference.  Some supervisors may not want to be bothered, so check with your supervisor first and ask them what sort of communication they are okay with.  Do they prefer a phone call or email?  Be sure to ask!
  4. End on a good note.  Many sayings derive from “you’re only as good as your last (insert word)”.  This goes for internships too.  Just because it’s your last day or week, that doesn’t mean you should slack off or not take on new projects.  Give it your all as if it was your first week.  Be sure to leave on a positive note so that #3 will turn out in your favor.
  5. Reflect on what you learned. Internships are all about the learning experience so reflect on what you gained from your semester.  Decide what you want from your next internship and if you changed your career path or mindset compared to the beginning of your internship.
  6. Update your LinkedIn. This goes hand in hand with #5.  While the internship is still fresh in your mind, update your LinkedIn with the type of assignments and tasks that you did at your internship.  It’ll be much easier now when it’s fresh in your mind compared to a year from now because you finally reset your password!

Happy end of the semester!
Ashley

You’re Here, Now What?

You’ve made it to New York!! Tall buildings, bright lights, how exciting! …Now what? All your friends and family are back home. Your roommate is kinda cool, but you two don’t exactly “click”. Despite New York’s reputation as one of the loneliest cities there are many ways to meet cool people!

If you are missing being an athlete and bonding with a team, you can look for inter-city sports teams. If venturing off-campus is a little too daunting for you, FIT also has classes anyone can attend including yoga, spin, kickboxing and open gyms for basketball.

A fantastic way to meet people and give back to your new home is by volunteering. Believe it or not, this megalithic city doesn’t just run itself. The City has a program set up to match volunteers with types of organizations they are interested in working with, like the environment, community/neighborhoods, health, education, etc. Volunteer Match is another organization that finds opportunities close to you (but you can also sort based on your interests).

New York is a city full of artists. If you want to expand your creativity or be inspired by others there are ample opportunities to see artists at work. A fun and safe environment to overcome stage fright is The Open Mic Downstairs – a great place to meet other actors, comedians, singers, etc. It is also only $3 if you want to just see talented people letting themselves go. If spoken word (with some comedy) is more your style “Bareburger Unplugged” is a place also meant to be a safe environment for artists to experiment, and they have some of the best organic burgers on the island. Another fun way to meet people is to go to a paint night.  Located all over the city, and almost every day, this is no pressure studio time (the paintings they give as the sample are more like guidelines I say).

It can be kind of awkward to start a conversation with a random person out of the blue, so the easiest way to do it is to have something to talk about right away, like something you have in common. The best way to have this is to attend events that are centered around shared interests. New York Comic Con is one of the biggest and most famous example, although tickets can cost hundreds of dollars and sell out within minutes. Meetup facilitates meetings of people with similar interests, and extend all through New York City, not just Manhattan. These groups are incredibly diverse with runners, a Capella singers, “foodie couples”, and Jewish parents of Astoria (I don’t know if that last one would apply to anyone reading this, but hey, FIT has an incredibly diverse student body!). The coolest “meetup” idea I’ve seen, which I totally want to try ASAP, is meal sharing. Eat With puts up times that chefs in your area are hosting dinner parties or cooking classes. Not only is it a great way to have a fantastic, authentic  meal, but it is an awesome resource for students who cannot get home for the holidays, but still want to have a group meal.

For even more ideas try Time Out NY. Do any of you have suggestions?

–Emily–

Apartment Hunting

If you have been keeping up with the blog, you’d know that I am planning on living off campus in an apartment next year.  I spent my entire spring break looking, having appointments, and well…stressing out.  Here are some tips that I have for those of you looking for apartments in the future:

  • Download StreetEasy: StreetEasy a website that lists apartments on the market in your area.  You can put in all of your criteria as far as budget, neighborhoods, amenities, etc.  It’s an incredible website and it also has an app so you can constantly be checking new listings, saving apartments to your favorites on your account, and reaching out to the buildings themselves.
  • Be prepared: Myself and my roommate didn’t use a broker because of the amounts of research that was done in advanced.  For a year now, I have been taking notes in my phone of buildings that I pass by and writing down their addresses to look up later.  While you don’t have to be constantly on the watch and taking notes for an entire year, it is good to not start from scratch, but StreetEasy also makes it simple if you don’t have a ton of apartment requirements.
  • Talk things out beforehand: While this may seem like common sense, be sure that everyone involved is on the same page with what you are looking for not only in an apartment but as a roommate as well.
  • Don’t compromise: Remain firm in what you want in an apartment.  If you know that you are going to be miserable commuting from the Upper East Side (6 to the S to the 1…no thank you), then don’t do it.  Half of the battle with going to school is getting there!  And if you are an Art & Design major, the supplies that you have to bring with you can make a simple commute 100000x worse, especially at prime rush hour times.
  • Ask questions: Ask whomever you made the appointment with tons of questions!  Ask about what’s included in the rent, how long the rent would be, the application process, the necessary documents, if there have been any issues with bedbugs or cleanliness, the laundry room, and the environment of the building.  You don’t want to move in and be unhappy now, do you?

I hope these tips helped!  Feel free to ask any questions about apartments!

Ashley

Let’s Get Creative!

“The Foundation Year”

If you have been applying to other arts universities, you will recognize this as the first year of school that is dedicated not to your major of choice, but rather a general sampling of a majority of the visual arts mediums. The idea is to allow students to experience as many forms of the creative process as possible, before they decide what they want to focus in for the rest of their time at college, and potentially the rest of their lives.

The fact that FIT does not have a foundation year was actually one of the main draws for me when I was a senior in high school. Back then I thought the foundation year seemed like a waste, since I was already so sure of what I was going to do for the rest of my life (and we all know how that turned out – cue self-deprecating eye roll). I never like to be wrong, but I must admit that in hindsight sixteen-year-old me may have been slightly too self-assured.

Honestly, one of the hardest parts of FIT for me was continually pushing myself creatively. Of course, projects require a certain amount of creativity, but it is usually restricted by some guidelines or simply time restraints. The workload at FIT is exhausting, so it can be very difficult to  carve out time for personal and uninhibited creation. Even when I had time, I was usually too tired from all the work I had just finished to focus and push myself to put in the effort to do something extra. Looking back, I think a foundation year could have been really effective in learning to hone original thought and experiment with unexpected materials and techniques. It would be especially cool if we could pick our own classes – like a “create your own foundation year”. I definitely would have taken some photography classes, experimental materials, classical drawing for anatomy, film production, ceramics, figure drawing (actually I did take this class my first semester of Fashion Design and it was great and I would totally do it again), I mean the list could go on.

Realistically, there is not enough time in the Art & Design school’s curriculum for such an idea, but the huge wealth of specific information we receive here is one of the largest benefits of coming to FIT. Yet, I wonder if I have missed out on some of the most creatively fruitful years of my life. I have found that the most exciting work does not come from knowing, but instead not knowing and saying, “Hey I have the crazy idea and I don’t have a clue how to make it work but let’s just try it!” Whether or not you end up attending FIT, I hope you keep this in the back of your head. Grades and classes are important of course, but I bet the work you will be most proud of is the stuff that you had no idea if it would work or not, but experimented and failed until it did.

–Emily–