Notes From the 6 Train: Just Call Me DJ Aya

So as I mentioned before, winter break is the perfect time to experimenting and trying new things. For me, music had been an outlet I’ve been in dabbling in. I’ve always been very connected to music (much like the music industry and the fashion industry, one is influenced by the other.) This holiday season I sent my closest friends a healing folder as a gift. As apart of this folder I created this mix (my very first mix guys.) And I am excited to share it with you all! Below is this precursor to the mix. The link is included below.

“I get to share something with you that’s super, very important. As some of you may or may not know, I have begun DJing, and I am thrilled to be sharing my very first mix with you! You were my inspiration, brilliant, talented, dynamic women. I wanted to create something that was drenched in this very essence of the ultimate, awesome, omnipotent feminine energy. Initially, I was going to make this mix composed of only women artists. But that idea didn’t last long as, as I know just how important it is honor the holy feminine AND masculine (I am so lucky to know a plethora of women who embody both energies in such a beautiful way it felt absurd for me to bar that type of musical love.) On the last note, I want to mention that this mix is about how you feel, how you should be love and loved upon. The songs in this mix represent all aspects in life (I hope), when you’re feeling sassy or soulful or even when you’re even feeling uncertain about who you are/your purpose, I wanted it to be just as multidimensional as you. I hope you enjoy listening to it (and turning up to it) as much as I loved making it for you. I present the first of many loved filled art and music projects to come!”

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Brendan’s Guide to Winter Break

As I sit here writing, it is currently “blizzard-ing” outside my window. Oh, January. You look so pretty…but then I’m forced to go outside and I remember how cold-hearted you are. The excitement and joy of December seems like a distant memory. The holidays never seem long enough. However, it is now a New Year. Another year to move forward with your goals and aspirations. Another year to check those boxes off on your bucket list. Another year to live your best life!

Winter break in college is like a double edged sword. You can use it to your advantage, or let it take advantage of you. This break is the perfect time to reboot after a hardworking semester. We all can’t wait to get home and not have projects, or finals to worry about! Its a great feeling.

My first year at FIT, I was new to the “6 weeks off at Christmas through January, instead of one week off like high school, to do whatever you want with no homework or responsibilities.” It was awesome to have that much time off from school, and to be home with my friends and family. That feeling never goes away, I just approach my winter break’s differently now than I did back then.

My first winter break I was basically a blob. My couch and I became even closer than we were before, molding to each others shapes. Netflix was a great friend for those few weeks. And yes, I have wonderful human friends as well. We would get together, get food, go to the local Target, because the options are quite limited in wintery upstate New York. By the time my break was over, I felt gross, out of shape, like I’d eaten two years worth of Christmas cookies. I hadn’t accomplished much on a small checklist I’d made at the beginning of break. I had done my fair share of relaxing, to the point of exhaustion, which lead to more relaxing! A never ending cycle!

But hey, it was my first time and I was learning. That is why I vowed then to make my winter breaks more productive and beneficial to ME. Maybe some people have no problem doing nothing, cozying up in their home and snacking on Xmas cookies. I have now learned that these few weeks are the perfect time to make a list, and get things done. Things you’ve been wanting to do all semester, but may have not had time for. 

SO, if you feel like your break could have been a bit better, I’ve come up with a short list of tips for you to follow. 

1. Indulge in the Holidays

By no means am I saying to not fully relax and soak up the holiday season. Please do!! By that point in our year, we need the family parties, delicious meals and holiday movies on ABC family. Embrace your time with your friends and family who you may not see throughout the year. Give them hugs and tell them you love them! Give back, do something kind, spread the holiday spirit! EAT LIKE YOU’VE NEVER EATEN BEFORE!

2. Set Realistic New Year’s Resolutions

Once the holidays are over, it’s easy to slip into “Post Holiday Depression,” as I like to call it. The hype is over, the Christmas tree is plopped at the end of your driveway. After New Years, write a list of some things you really hope to do within the upcoming year. Big picture resolutions like “WIN THE LOTTERY,” may be a little unrealistic. Think of personal goals you’d like to attain. Say something kind to someone every day, Read more books, Go to a concert. I find that smaller, positive goals are easier to check off my list! That way, when you look back next year you’ll see how much you’ve accomplished. The energy you enter into the New Year with is a great indicator of how your year could turn out. This year I want to take more Bikram Yoga classes and eat healthier foods! I can do that :)

3. Find Enjoyable Hobbies

If you live where it snows, you know some days seem longer and more mundane than others. Its too cold to be outside, or the roads are too icy to drive on. Looks like your spending the day at home! This is where hobbies come in handy! I re-learned how to knit this winter, and have been really enjoying doing that. I’m working on some belated Christmas gifts. I also have been pecking away at the “Books I want to Read” list. (Is it obvious that I like to create lists?) Find what passes your time without feeling like you’re just passing time. Make sense?

4. Get a Job

If you’re like me (or most kids my age I know) you’re a typical “broke college student.” I’ve had a job since I was 15, even throughout college. Personally, I enjoy to work for my money. It feels so much better spending it when you know how hard you worked ;) I understand some may not be home long enough to find, apply, and get a job. Luckily, I have a job that I can come back to whenever I’m home, at a local bistro. Since I’m home for a few weeks, it’s the perfect time to build my bank account back up before the next semester. I don’t have much time for a job in the city anymore, with school and interning. If you have the option to work a few shifts while you’re home, do it! It keeps you busy AND gives you some spending money!

5. Review Your Upcoming Semester

We’ve all had that nightmare where you walk into school (usually in your underwear) and don’t know where any of your classes are, you’re completely unprepared, and everyones pointing and laughing at you. Let’s not make that nightmare reality, shall we? MyFIT has many ways for you to learn about your classes before actually sitting down at your desk. I like to screenshot my schedule on my phone, so that when the first day comes, I have a visual. It’s a big help for locating room numbers, because I never remember! I also enjoy looking at who’s going to be in my class. It’s always comforting to know you have a friend in class on your first day. Log onto MyFIT, click the Student tab, scroll down to “My Courses,” click “Click here to enter,” click on your course title, then click “Members” under Personal Tools. It shows you a full class list! It helps to subdue any nerves and get you excited for the upcoming Spring semester!

Everyone is different. Everyone approaches things differently, even our college winter breaks. Long story LONG, do what makes you happy and makes you feel good during this time! For me,  enjoy feeling like I’ve accomplished things over break. I hope that some of these tips are helpful to you! Please enjoy the rest of your winter breaks, and HAPPY BELATED NEW YEAR!

xx,

Brendan

Final project

IMG_0197                                     ( That’s my professor Peter along with my classmates )

Hey everyone! Finals are finally over , along with final projects! This semester was my last semester as an interior design student. That’s right, I am switching majors! I couldn’t be more excited to join the international trade and marketing major. But before all the new fun begins I had to finish my final fourth semester interior design project.

Fourth semester one of your projects will be designing a light fixture which you will then have to use in a restaurant you design. The light fixture for my project was based off Julie and Julia the movie. ( which you can see along with directions on how to make it in my next blog post ”  How to engineer a light fixture” .

So for restaurant I was assigned Texas BBQ which includes sloppy ribs , cowboy boots and all things big and Texas haha. So I decided to put a little spin on it and design a higher end bbq restaurant.

IMG_0148 (1)This was a screen shot from when I was working on it. My best advice to all incoming interior design students learn Photoshop, lumion, sketchup, all rendering programs as soon as you can . it will make your life so much easier! For this project I used sketchup. I feel that it is very easy to learn, I taught myself with the book ” google sketchup the missing manual” and  by just playing around endlessly. FIT does teach you programs as autocad and revit but not until your bachelors will you learn how to render in these programs and you need to know how by atleast third semester. Also photoshop is offered but not required to take.  The more programs you learn and add to your skill set can only help you not only at FIT but in the real world. Most interior designers aren’t using Revit completely yet and that’s a great skill to have to bring to a company.

Overall my restaurant came out pretty good for my second attempt at using sketchup. I used a lot of dark woods and creative ceiling solutions with all sustainable elements. NEVER FORGET THE CEILING OR THE LIGHTING ! most students do and that’s critical to show you truly understand the floor plan and overall design of the space.

The interior design program was challenging but worth every second of hard work. It has taught me things I know people in other design programs have no idea about. Maybe after my bachelors in marketing I will go back to interior design , only time will tell.

Goodbye FIT interior designers, I will miss you all so much you became my family, along with my  amazing professors ! But its time to start the new chapter of my life!

Xoxo

Kailee

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Discovering a Major: Fabric Styling

Despite the fact that the Fashion Design and the Fashion Merchandising Management programs are by far the largest here, FIT is not just a “fashion” school. We offer 29 undergraduate programs and 7 graduate programs. However, even after four years I was shocked, shocked, to find out that majors existed that I had never heard of (I’m looking at you Home Products Design). So, in an effort to bring to light the many other fantastic opportunities FIT offers, I am started a new segment called “Discovering a Major”.

Usually, I will have mini interviews with students from each major giving insight into what they actually do and learn, but for this first installment I think I will discuss my own rather unknown major: Fabric Styling.

This was a tabletop styling project we did this semester

This was a tabletop styling project we did this semester

Originally, I was a Fashion Design major and got my Associates Degree in that. However, towards the end of my second year I was getting frustrated and overwhelmed with the program. After many hours of crying on the phone with my mom questioning every possible path I could take, I decided to switch my major on the last possible day to apply for Fabric Styling.

Fabric Styling is a weird major, and no one really knows how to describe it. I say it’s a very broad field of study that mixes textile development, trend forecasting and actual styling. This variety is a big part of why I chose it. At 20 years old I really didn’t have a clear sign of exactly what I wanted to do with the rest of my life and choosing a less specific major was actually really freeing for me and re-ignited my creativity.

This was a fashion styling project we did with a real studio set up and model

This was a fashion styling project we did with a real studio set up and model

I am still not totally clear on where I want to be after I graduate (and yes, it is still extremely stressful), but i know I want to stay in the fashion world and travel around the world. Hopefully I will be able to find a job that allows me to do both. So far I have had internships with a small fashion designer, ELLE magazine, the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and an agency for stylists.

I was the first Fabric Styling student (along with one classmate) to have the chance to study abroad. Florence was amazing, although most of our classes were not exactly what students in New York were doing. I will say the program is not run perfectly, but there are lots of opportunities available if you take advantage of them.

This was a mood board for a lingerie design project

This was a mood board for a lingerie design project

I really enjoy the “Fabric Styling” and “Research Techniques” classes because although the projects have specific end goals, we are free to achieve them however we feel and it has allowed me to creatively stretch my presentation skills. My least favorite class so far has been  “Advertising and Promotion”. I just don’t think the advertising and marketing worlds are for me, although it was helpful to be introduced to the more business side of the industry.

We learn many different programs for developing textiles

We learn many different programs for developing textiles

My favorite part of the major is that it is only a Bachelor’s degree program so everyone comes from different academic backgrounds. Most people started in the Fashion Merchandising Management (although the department has been changing their policies and as of now is no longer accepting anyone from the business school unfortunately), but I have classmates that have studied Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design, Textile/Surface Design and even transferred from outside liberal arts colleges. It has been really helpful to not only see how they interpret the projects, but also hear their critiques and past experiences.

If you are interested in more examples of work I have done for Fabric Styling you can see my portfolio here. To learn more about the major itself click here!

I hope to introduce you to more of the lesser-known majors FIT offers soon!

–Emily–

Notes From the 6 Train: Watch Your Way to Inner Peace

The Cruise

This is about the life of a New York city tour guide, Timothy “Speed” Levitch, who gained a cult-like following during the stint of his time working at Apple and then Grey bus tours. He passion for life, New York and his heartfelt soliloquies captured the attention of so many bus riders that he was worthy enough of a documentary.

Listen to his eccentric philosophy that can challenge your perceptions of New York and the mundane daily life activities that we have all probably done at least once. He also talks about New York architecture and the lives/ homes of famous writers and artists.

Waking Life

This is an animation about unnamed character who moves through the movie in a lucid dream. The main character is essentially stuck in a dream and spends floating from one speaker to another, absorbing whatever knowledge that have to offer, most of it about life, interconnectivity of human life, metaphysics, various artists, etc.

There’s even a small cameo from Tim “Speed” Levitch from the The Cruise (that’s how incredibly pervasive this eccentric tour guide was.)

I hope these tools gets you started on your quest for inner serenity once the weather becomes absolutely crazy. If you can find peace during New York winters, you might be the next Dali Lama.

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Influencers at FIT – Valerie Steele

Here at FIT we have a vast resource at our fingertips: the Museum at FIT (located below the Gladys Marcus library). In addition to the numerous exhibitions held every year, students also have access to the study collection where garments, accessories and textiles can be seen up close.  Valerie Steele is the curator of the Museum, a prolific fashion academic, and the editor of the journal Fashion Theory. I sat down with Ms. Steele to discuss her impressive history as well as the museum’s past and future:

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

This interview has been edited and condensed for publication


Since this interview is for the Admissions Blog, I wanted to ask you a little about your own education. What did you find most helpful about your university education?

Hmm…well, I’ve never been asked that before. I guess that the most important thing I learned, both as an undergraduate at Dartmouth and a graduate student at Yale, was how to do research–learning how to use primary research. I know when I used to teach in the graduate school here at FIT, that was something I pounded into the students, the difference between primary and secondary research. That was something I thought was especially important.

You said that while getting your PhD the study of fashion was really vilified. Being here in New York, which is one of the “big four” fashion capitals, and also being here at FIT one of the best design schools, it may seem like this has passed, but do you think there has actually been change outside of this bubble?

Well, I think fashion is much more accepted as a field of serious study. There are many more people around the world working on articles, books and exhibitions about fashion. On the other hand, there are still very few places that offer a doctorate in fashion studies. It is still very much an interdisciplinary field. So, if you want to go ahead and study fashion you still have to think, “Will I be in an art history department or history or cultural studies? Where can I find someplace to study that?”

And you never studied museum-ology or museum theory, so was it difficult to transition from academic writing to more creatively focused exhibitions?

It’s interesting you should ask that. My doctorate is in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, but I did every single class, except one, and my dissertation in the history of fashion. When I started teaching in the graduate school at FIT, it was in what was then the Museum Studies Costume and Textiles Department, now it is called Fashion and Textiles Studies: History, Theory and Museum Practice. So I was teaching fashion history, but within the framework of a museum studies program. Obviously it was exciting and new to actually be putting on exhibitions here. That was a big thrill. It is not that different from the kind of research you do for putting together a big article or a book. In fact, all my big exhibitions here are accompanied by a book as well, so it is the same kind of research procedure.

In that same vein, who do you see as the audience of the Museum at FIT, and how do you pique their interests?

Well, our audiences are multiple. Obviously the FIT community is one of our core audiences, and then people in fashion and design-related fields are another. A third is just the museum-going public, and that is very much an international public. So, we try to do shows that represent original research, but that are also accessible to people at all levels of sophistication. A lot of the FIT community or designers who come to shows really know a lot about fashion history and design so you have to give them more, extra in-depth things. But you also want to be accessible to people who walk in off the street. They might be anyone from a six-year-old to a grandma who might not know very much about fashion, but you have to intrigue them as well. That is the idea to try and present it in a way which is visually stimulating and exciting so that whether they know anything about the topic or if they bother to read anything, they can still get something out of the show.

I actually have noticed a lot of children when I am in the museum, and I am amazed they are not only interested, but they comment on stuff!

Oh they will! Absolutely! A colleague of mine brought her two-year-old son to the corset show, and she said he just sat down on the floor and gazed up at this Vivenne Westwood corset-dress. She thought it was wonderful, she said, “oh there he is fantasizing about the eternal feminine.”

What do you think the hardest part about developing a show is? Is it picking the topic or is it finding people to work with or…?

Oh, I don’t know if there is a “hardest” part. I think one of the challenges is actually getting your hands on the things you want to put in the show. You’ll do all kinds of research, and you’ll think, “Okay I want this dress, I want this dress…” but then you have to find out who owns that? And will they lend it to me? And how much will it cost to borrow it, how can I raise the money to borrow it? Et cetera, et cetera.

Well, that leads me into my next question. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute collection is the only one, at least in New York, that can even compare to the one at the Museum at FIT. So what is your relationship with them, do you borrow and lend a lot for shows?

We do borrow and lend with them. I wouldn’t say a lot, but every few shows they will borrow something from us or we will borrow from them. Two pieces in the dance exhibition are from the Met, and we’re lending I think four pieces to their China exhibition which will open in the Spring.

So it is only a few pieces then. I guess you both have such huge collections neither of you need to borrow anything.

Well, it is interesting, we will borrow back and forth for a few key pieces, and both of us have a pretty good idea of what is in the other collection. We also borrow and lend from the Museum of the City of New York, which also has a fantastic collection. Most of the older things, for example, if there is a 19th century thing, we will try and borrow from them. We also loaned to their Stephen Burrows show a year ago.

Oh yes, I saw that show and I have to admit I was a little surprised. I didn’t think the Museum of the City of New York had that much fashion, but I guess they do.

Oh, they do! They have a really wonderful fashion collection.

Is there one specific exhibit that sticks out in your mind as being particularly exciting or difficult or just interesting for you?

Well, a couple. I loved working on Gothic: Dark Glamour. That was the first time we did a really immersive mise-en- scène with a graveyard, a laboratory, and a ruined castle and things. That was great fun, and I think good preparation for upcoming shows like our fairy tale show, which we will do in 2016 that will similarly have dramatic mise-en-scènes. And then, of course, A Queer History of Fashion won us a lot of prizes, particularly for the work that we did both in reaching out to the LGBT community and doing media online. I think that was also good preparation for remembering to focus on diversity themes in all of our shows and also remembering to emphasize media media media! It is a great way to reach out to people. Even if they cannot come in the door of the exhibition, they can still get information and images online.

Who writes for Fashion Theory, which is your journal?

It is mostly curators and professors and graduate students.

So is it mostly people you have met? Or do people apply?

No, no it is a peer-reviewed journal which means that people send things in, and then I have to find one or two experts in their field who will peer review it and say whether or not it is good enough to go in, or absolutely not, or can it go in only if they make x, y, z changes. It is much more prestigious and important for scholars to be published in a peer-reviewed journal than just a regular magazine.

I just wanted to introduce the readers to the Couture Council, because I think a lot of people don’t even know that it exists. And to be honest, I don’ t know that much about it because there isn’t that much information available.

Yes, the Couture Council is a friends group, which many museums have. It is a membership group; members pay $1,000 a year and young members under 35 pay $350 a year. They can come to various events, and the money–their membership fees along with the awards luncheon–help fund exhibitions, public programs and acquisitions for the museum. We get some money from corporations and foundations, but the Couture Council is nice because it is reliable. No matter what our show is about, whether it is a kooky one that we can’t get any corporate sponsors to fund, or it is controversial in some way, we know the Couture Council is there to help support all our exhibitions and all our public programs.

Lastly, is there anything you would like to do professionally that you haven’t had the chance to do yet?

Well, of course, if you had your own television show, you could reach a bigger audience. I do a lot of [appearances on] TV shows, but I think there is a lot more that could be done. Now, of course, television is becoming a bit outdated, so you really have to think in terms of the world-wide web. We have a new department specifically focusing on media and new initiatives. Many of the videos shown in the lobby are on the YouTube page. On YouTube there’s a little of this and a little of that. Each of the fashion exhibitions has its own website and we’re increasingly doing videos for those.

Yes, I have used the exhibition websites for information for some class projects. They are done really beautifully. Well, thank you so much for sitting down with me. It was a pleasure talking to you!

Of course, with pleasure! Thank you, it was nice talking to you!

–Emily–

Notes From The 6 Train: Read Your Way To Inner Peace

As a follow up to my most recent post I have a few exploratory works that may assist you in the your winter time of self discovery.

The following books are on the more metaphysical side, which is perfect since you will have the plenty of time to mull them over once the snow begins to pour down upon us. To align with the idea of looking back, we can use these creations to help us shape our future.

This is the version I purchased

This is the version I purchased

Tao Te Ching
I’ve read and caught glimpses of the Tao Te Ching but it wasn’t until this semester that I’ve read this holy text in it’s entirety. The Tao Te Ching is the primary text used by Taoists. I don’t use the Tao Te Ching for religious reasons, but as a guide and reminder as how to move through life. In the simplest terms, its simply to exist in the middle, displaying balance during the most ecstatic and the most challenging time times of life.

Here are a few chapters from the Tao Te Ching:

Chapter 9:

Fill your bowl to the brim
and it will spill.
Keep sharpening your knife
and it will blunt.
Chase after money and security
and your heart will never unclench.
Care about people’s approval
and you will be their prisoner.

Do your work, then step back.
The only path to serenity.

Chapter 19:
Throw away holiness and wisdom,
and people will be a hundred times happier.
Throw away morality and justice,
and people will do the right thing.
Throw away industry and profit,
and there won’t be any thieves.

If these three aren’t enough,
just stay at the center of the circle
and let all things take their course.

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The Untethered Soul

This is one of my cherished books. It was gifted to me from a really important mentor in my life, (which if you don’t know have a mentor, not just a career oriented one, but also people who support your growth in other ways, be open to getting one).
This book is about moving outside of your immediate self and living life as if “there were a knife suspended above your head.” Because essentially, there is. Reading this book has the same of impact of having a near death experience, without the melodramatics, you end up with the same feeling of wanting to live your life to its fullest capacity.

I hope these tools gets you started on your quest for inner serenity once the weather becomes absolutely crazy. If you can find peace during New York winters, you might be the next Dali Lama.

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Notes From The 6 Train: Winter Wonda-Land

In case you all didn’t weren’t attuned…it’s officially winter! Yay!

I know its been feeling quite winter-esque for the past few months, but yesterday marks the official beginning of winter. Winter can be challenging, as it creates of atmosphere of hibernation and isolation. Both of these can be draining, if you let it simply happen to you as opposed to settling into acceptance and/or appreciation.

Winter-Wonderland-Tumblr-1

To be honest, this is the first time in my entire life that I’ve been so welcoming of winter. The cold is difficult for me. And until last winter, I had never actually had to live in real snow (I come from Atlanta, so you know snow was a rarity for me.) However, I noticed a real shift within myself as the winter equinox this time. I am feeling the hibernation energy. More and more I realize how the outer climate impacts the inner climate. Just as all the creatures are preparing for winter, we should be as well. This means some type of hibernation, staying in to work on our passion project, watching, reading or creating all the things you’ve been “meaning to,” and more than anything, this is a time for self reflection. As the year comes to and end, there is no time like the present to review this past year. I don’t mean some basic surface level “review,” but taking a hot bubble bath and plunging into yourself. They’ll be no reason to rush out, the cold wants you to do just a little more self care than usual.

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-If that sounds like a bit of a challenge, here are some easy tips via Deepak Chopra to have a happy, healthy, winter. (That’s not boring, because I know that’s one complaint I hear often)

Walk in the sunshine for 10 minutes every day it’s sunny.
Walk in a really cheerful place when it’s cloudy, such as a park of arboretum where the trees are majestic in winter.
Spend regular time with the most cheerful people I know.
Take up a light recreational sport at the community center.
Mentor a young person.
Plan a dream vacation in every detail, living it through beautiful photos and magazine articles so that it feels as real as possible.
Turn quiet time alone into something inspiring by reading spiritual books or poetry.
Write letters, making each as entertaining as possible to the recipient.
These are all energizing options, the very opposite of dull. And that’s the key. Find inputs that are complete opposites of the conditioning that keeps you stuck in a negative situation.

Here’s the link if interested in the rest of this extremely helpful article.

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Curious About the Dorms?

Wondering what the dorms are actually like? Take a look at some FIT student’s room tours!

Nagler:

Alumni:

Coed:

Kaufman:

How to Apply for Housing:

Hope that answers some questions!

–Emily–

How to Get Away with Finals

Hi Everyone,

Today is first day of the rest of my life (post-college). What I’m trying to say is, I’M DONE WITH FINALS! I just realised this means, no more homework, no more all-nighters, no more finals EVER (well at least until I do my Masters lol). What am I going to do with my life? (uhm I can think of a million things honestly). For starters I already signed a lease (wow growing up real quick) and went on one job interview (please keep your toes crossed). Seems like im settling down, right? I shall keep you guys updated with this breaking story (haha).

In the meanwhile for those of you, who still have some finals to go or have just started the first round of finals in your FIT lifecycle I have some words of wisdom I’d like to share. This post is mostly about how FIT helped me survive this week and how I myself nailed it.

1. Need some stress relief? Go to PET Therapy! Yes, you heard right puppies that will play with you and help you forget about everything (I just love FIT). Little fluff balls pouncing around waiting for a treat greeted you at the library. It was seriously a very popular event (I mean the line was 45 mins long) but completely worth it. Screen Shot 2014-12-10 at 9.36.15 PM

 

2. Treat yourself after completing that ridiculously long exam. What better than retail therapy, with a purpose? This year for the second time we launched the holiday pop-up shop made by VPED 3rd semester students in collaboration with The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s thrift shop. Last year we raised $35K in just five days, this year we MUST break the record.

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3. Just add water, literally haha. This week marks the special care package week where we students receive love from our parents and family in the form of food. The perfect survival kit in a box, for those moments when you just need to study. If you are loved you got one of those blue boxes, if you didn’t don’t fret there is always canned tuna salad in the vending machines (yeah, NO judgments allowed here).3676733c132e1f1158b4518a74dea28b

 

4. Holiday Lights will remind you it is ALMOST Christmas. That moment when you feel your head is about to explode, just walk out and get lost in the lights. There is something about these blue twinkly lights that promises there is light at the end of the tunnel.

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5. And my personal favorite is, study hard but be real. Whatever you didn’t learn in the past 4 months will not come magically to you overnight. Do study, but don’t die in the process. Sleeping is equally as important, because if you miss the alarm because you were too tired all that studying was just time lost.

Good luck with what’s left. And remember above all, have fun:10394782_801228603267000_6866632826051398557_n

Carpe Diem,

Sadie