Category Archives: FIT Resources

Notes From The 6 Train: New Opportunities Alert!

I’m a tutor at the writing center now. Yay! It’s something I’ve thought about much in the past and finally applied this past semester. I will begin working at the beginning of February. I know we’ve discussed the tutor/writing centers before but I’ve done more research since being hired.

The FIT Writing Center holds monthly seminars that focuses on different elements to improve your writing (super exciting for someone whose a writing nerd such as I). The FIT Writing Center also participates in writing conferences that take place all over, last year they went to Disney World and the year before they went to Germany (and from what I hear it’s sponsored by FIT, that just means = free! But I have to do a bit more detective work about this.)

Also, it is a paid position on campus AND is more than minimum wage. And you’re only obligated to work 6 hours weekly (but you can work more if you want) and they are quite flexible about scheduling. So when thinking about a job, you might not need to look very far, maybe just over your shoulder or a few doors down!

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

Student Ambassador Application!

Remember those awesome people that led your orientation group when you were a new student?  Those are FIT’s Student Ambassadors!  Student Ambassadors lead orientation, help with residential move-in, and events throughout the year.  The program is immensely rewarding and tons of fun!  The program itself is the equivalent of a large, wonderful family all breaking out into song…specifically Beyonce.  As a Student Ambassador you not only get FIT shirts/a jacket as your uniform (exclusive to the program), you also get paid but the experience is so rewarding, I would do be a part of the program even if it was volunteers only!  Being a Student Ambassador has truly been life changing and has made my experience at FIT incredible!

If you are interested in becoming a Student Ambassador (current Freshman-Juniors only) for the 2015-2016 school year here is the link to the Student Ambassador page/application: http://www.fitnyc.edu/3158.asp.  Applications are due Friday, February 23rd at 5pm!  Hope to see you soon!

Ashley

Notes From The 6 Train Student Spotlight: Liz Pulos

During finals week last year, I had a chance to sit down with Elizabeth Pulos, a soon to be international trade & marketing major (and politics minor) who is officially finished with FIT in just a few weeks. This, of course, will be after her Peru. She’s participating in the International Trade & Marketing Department practicum in Peru, the class necessary to complete all degree credits. Before she set off on her journey to foreign countries she talked to me about the incredible things (my words, not hers) she participated in/ accomplished while a student here at FIT.

look how Fancy Liz looks!

look how Fancy Liz looks!

Here’s a very brief list:
– Winner of three International Trade & Marketing Scholarships: Ralph Lauren, New Times & PVH (which she encourages all ITM majors to apply for, this money helped pay for her trip to Peru)

-Writer and participant of the newly formed Brooklyn Fashion & Design Accelerator which is “The Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator is a hub for ethical fashion and design where designers transform their ideas into successful businesses”

Check it out here: http://bkaccelerator.com/can-fashion-hunting-apps-help-sustainable-designers/

– President of the Corporate Social & Responsibility Club for the past several semesters where she organized/ facilitated incredible events open to the FIT community such as: having the Alliance advisor Ian Spaulding and VF Corporation Supply Chain VP Tom Nelson came to speak on campus or bringing in Chelsea Cooper (a FIT grad), founder of the CSR Club and Associate Manager of Men’s Denim Development at Ralph Lauren.

– Contributor of a chapter in an upcoming college textbook (how cool is that?!

We did not plan to wear matching bottoms! Just have great synergy. :)

The CSR club this semester, we didn’t plan to wear matching bottoms! Just have great synergy. :)

All of this, not to mention volunteering at the Best Friends Pet Adoption Agency, maintaining a 4.0, playing in a band, working in the film and movie industry, working on her own social compliance small business and being a generally kind and intelligent human. I had the pleasure to get to know Liz on a more personal level during the past semester. During the fall we were in the International Business Law class and served together on the board of the Corporate Social Responsibility Club. And I know that she will continue after graduation. Congrats Liz Pulos!

All things Color, Love, & Fashion,
Ayanna L.

How to engineer a light fixture

Hello everyone !

So in fourth semester interior design studio we are asked to make a light fixture , that’s right a real working light fixture . You have to wire it , make an actual blue print of it , and sketch other ways it can be turned into a different light fixtures . This light will then be placed in your restaurant that you will be designing . You will pick a movie and then base your lighting fixture off that movie .

My movie was Julie and Julia , most of you may know it . It’s a classic ,one of my favorites . I was so excited when I recieved it I worked harder on it then any other project I have had in the program. After many sketches and ideas that got passed on , I finally got it !

Overall I spent around 200.00 dollars , there was no limit on what could be used or how much you could spend or not spend . But for mine I went all out .

IMG_0307First I went to home depot, I knew I wanted a perforated metal but I wasn’t sure I was going to be able to find one. This was actually one long strip of metal that my dad bent for me into this oval and drilled holes in.

Next  we used metal tubing to hide wires and also keep the oval steady so it would be able to hold its own weight ( this fixture weighs almost 80 pounds) .

IMG_0312Next in the holes that were created we drilled into spoons I found at a thrift store. True silver spoons, I didn’t realize how hard this would be until I actually did it. There are over 100 spoons of all variations and ages. Serving spoons, dessert spoons, soup spoons, you name it it has it.

IMG_0317I wish I could post the video but I am not great at editing things yet and its to long. But the inner LED is a flexible band with changing colors. I put this on the inside edge of the metal and ran the wire through the top to look like it was apart of the hanging feature.

Remember I said this fixture weighs a lot? Well I carried this from Penn station to the 5th floor of the D building all by myself. I think the excitement of showing the critiques and my classmates gave me a little boost of adrenalin to carry it that far. ( In heels may I add)

In the end I got an A on my project, it was truly a project I put my heart and soul into and also something I couldn’t be more proud of in my career in the interior design program.

is there anything you are excited to do at FIT? Are you excited about the light fixture ?

Let’s talk about it

Discovering a Major: Art History and Museum Professions

by Stephanie Zlotnick as told to Emily Bennett

Steph Zlotnick

Steph Zlotnick

 

I am entering my sixth semester at FIT. I was originally Fashion Merchandising Management, which I got my AAS in, and then I switched into Art History and Museum Professions for my Bachelors of Science degree. I actually did not know that FIT had this major until the middle of my freshman year. I knew coming here that they had an art history minor, so I thought that I would want to do that, but when I found out there was a Bachelors major for it I  chose that instead since I fell in love with the classes.

I had to take some art history classes in FMM for my liberal arts requirements and I just fell in love with them. I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to stay in FMM for all four years, so when I found out that there was an Art History major, I decided to switch into it. I really like that it’s a combination of art history classes and business classes, teaching us the ins and outs of museums. I also like that the classes are more focused on writing, which is something I missed in my FMM classes. Art History and Museum Professions really teaches us both about art history in a variety of concentrations and how museums run. Many of our classes involve the history and purpose of museums as well as the administrative and business aspects of museum management.

Right now, I’m not completely sure what I want to do for my career in the end, but I really like the idea of doing special events or development in a museum. The degree is non-curatorial, but it prepares us for other departments within museums, like PR, development, education, special events, etc.

This past summer, I interned for ArtsWestchester, a small non-profit organization in White Plains, NY that runs programs and events to promote arts throughout Westchester County. I worked in the Development department as a Special Events/Fundraising intern, so I worked on planning an auction and gala to raise money for the organization.

It’s a difficult decision, but I think the most interesting classes I have taken are “Modern Art” and “History and Meaning of Museum”. I learned so much from them about art history in general as well as how much art and museums depend on culture and vice versa.

I think the most valuable thing I’ve learned at FIT is that it’s okay to not know exactly what you want right away. I came here thinking I would work in fashion, but when I didn’t love FMM as much as I thought I would, it was nice to know that I could switch my major to something I really wanted to learn more about, and it’s not wrong to want a change.

 


 

 Find out more about the Art History and Museum Professions major (BS) here!
–Emily–

Influencers at FIT – Valerie Steele

Here at FIT we have a vast resource at our fingertips: the Museum at FIT (located below the Gladys Marcus library). In addition to the numerous exhibitions held every year, students also have access to the study collection where garments, accessories and textiles can be seen up close.  Valerie Steele is the curator of the Museum, a prolific fashion academic, and the editor of the journal Fashion Theory. I sat down with Ms. Steele to discuss her impressive history as well as the museum’s past and future:

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

Credit: Aaron Cobbett

This interview has been edited and condensed for publication


Since this interview is for the Admissions Blog, I wanted to ask you a little about your own education. What did you find most helpful about your university education?

Hmm…well, I’ve never been asked that before. I guess that the most important thing I learned, both as an undergraduate at Dartmouth and a graduate student at Yale, was how to do research–learning how to use primary research. I know when I used to teach in the graduate school here at FIT, that was something I pounded into the students, the difference between primary and secondary research. That was something I thought was especially important.

You said that while getting your PhD the study of fashion was really vilified. Being here in New York, which is one of the “big four” fashion capitals, and also being here at FIT one of the best design schools, it may seem like this has passed, but do you think there has actually been change outside of this bubble?

Well, I think fashion is much more accepted as a field of serious study. There are many more people around the world working on articles, books and exhibitions about fashion. On the other hand, there are still very few places that offer a doctorate in fashion studies. It is still very much an interdisciplinary field. So, if you want to go ahead and study fashion you still have to think, “Will I be in an art history department or history or cultural studies? Where can I find someplace to study that?”

And you never studied museum-ology or museum theory, so was it difficult to transition from academic writing to more creatively focused exhibitions?

It’s interesting you should ask that. My doctorate is in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, but I did every single class, except one, and my dissertation in the history of fashion. When I started teaching in the graduate school at FIT, it was in what was then the Museum Studies Costume and Textiles Department, now it is called Fashion and Textiles Studies: History, Theory and Museum Practice. So I was teaching fashion history, but within the framework of a museum studies program. Obviously it was exciting and new to actually be putting on exhibitions here. That was a big thrill. It is not that different from the kind of research you do for putting together a big article or a book. In fact, all my big exhibitions here are accompanied by a book as well, so it is the same kind of research procedure.

In that same vein, who do you see as the audience of the Museum at FIT, and how do you pique their interests?

Well, our audiences are multiple. Obviously the FIT community is one of our core audiences, and then people in fashion and design-related fields are another. A third is just the museum-going public, and that is very much an international public. So, we try to do shows that represent original research, but that are also accessible to people at all levels of sophistication. A lot of the FIT community or designers who come to shows really know a lot about fashion history and design so you have to give them more, extra in-depth things. But you also want to be accessible to people who walk in off the street. They might be anyone from a six-year-old to a grandma who might not know very much about fashion, but you have to intrigue them as well. That is the idea to try and present it in a way which is visually stimulating and exciting so that whether they know anything about the topic or if they bother to read anything, they can still get something out of the show.

I actually have noticed a lot of children when I am in the museum, and I am amazed they are not only interested, but they comment on stuff!

Oh they will! Absolutely! A colleague of mine brought her two-year-old son to the corset show, and she said he just sat down on the floor and gazed up at this Vivenne Westwood corset-dress. She thought it was wonderful, she said, “oh there he is fantasizing about the eternal feminine.”

What do you think the hardest part about developing a show is? Is it picking the topic or is it finding people to work with or…?

Oh, I don’t know if there is a “hardest” part. I think one of the challenges is actually getting your hands on the things you want to put in the show. You’ll do all kinds of research, and you’ll think, “Okay I want this dress, I want this dress…” but then you have to find out who owns that? And will they lend it to me? And how much will it cost to borrow it, how can I raise the money to borrow it? Et cetera, et cetera.

Well, that leads me into my next question. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute collection is the only one, at least in New York, that can even compare to the one at the Museum at FIT. So what is your relationship with them, do you borrow and lend a lot for shows?

We do borrow and lend with them. I wouldn’t say a lot, but every few shows they will borrow something from us or we will borrow from them. Two pieces in the dance exhibition are from the Met, and we’re lending I think four pieces to their China exhibition which will open in the Spring.

So it is only a few pieces then. I guess you both have such huge collections neither of you need to borrow anything.

Well, it is interesting, we will borrow back and forth for a few key pieces, and both of us have a pretty good idea of what is in the other collection. We also borrow and lend from the Museum of the City of New York, which also has a fantastic collection. Most of the older things, for example, if there is a 19th century thing, we will try and borrow from them. We also loaned to their Stephen Burrows show a year ago.

Oh yes, I saw that show and I have to admit I was a little surprised. I didn’t think the Museum of the City of New York had that much fashion, but I guess they do.

Oh, they do! They have a really wonderful fashion collection.

Is there one specific exhibit that sticks out in your mind as being particularly exciting or difficult or just interesting for you?

Well, a couple. I loved working on Gothic: Dark Glamour. That was the first time we did a really immersive mise-en- scène with a graveyard, a laboratory, and a ruined castle and things. That was great fun, and I think good preparation for upcoming shows like our fairy tale show, which we will do in 2016 that will similarly have dramatic mise-en-scènes. And then, of course, A Queer History of Fashion won us a lot of prizes, particularly for the work that we did both in reaching out to the LGBT community and doing media online. I think that was also good preparation for remembering to focus on diversity themes in all of our shows and also remembering to emphasize media media media! It is a great way to reach out to people. Even if they cannot come in the door of the exhibition, they can still get information and images online.

Who writes for Fashion Theory, which is your journal?

It is mostly curators and professors and graduate students.

So is it mostly people you have met? Or do people apply?

No, no it is a peer-reviewed journal which means that people send things in, and then I have to find one or two experts in their field who will peer review it and say whether or not it is good enough to go in, or absolutely not, or can it go in only if they make x, y, z changes. It is much more prestigious and important for scholars to be published in a peer-reviewed journal than just a regular magazine.

I just wanted to introduce the readers to the Couture Council, because I think a lot of people don’t even know that it exists. And to be honest, I don’ t know that much about it because there isn’t that much information available.

Yes, the Couture Council is a friends group, which many museums have. It is a membership group; members pay $1,000 a year and young members under 35 pay $350 a year. They can come to various events, and the money–their membership fees along with the awards luncheon–help fund exhibitions, public programs and acquisitions for the museum. We get some money from corporations and foundations, but the Couture Council is nice because it is reliable. No matter what our show is about, whether it is a kooky one that we can’t get any corporate sponsors to fund, or it is controversial in some way, we know the Couture Council is there to help support all our exhibitions and all our public programs.

Lastly, is there anything you would like to do professionally that you haven’t had the chance to do yet?

Well, of course, if you had your own television show, you could reach a bigger audience. I do a lot of [appearances on] TV shows, but I think there is a lot more that could be done. Now, of course, television is becoming a bit outdated, so you really have to think in terms of the world-wide web. We have a new department specifically focusing on media and new initiatives. Many of the videos shown in the lobby are on the YouTube page. On YouTube there’s a little of this and a little of that. Each of the fashion exhibitions has its own website and we’re increasingly doing videos for those.

Yes, I have used the exhibition websites for information for some class projects. They are done really beautifully. Well, thank you so much for sitting down with me. It was a pleasure talking to you!

Of course, with pleasure! Thank you, it was nice talking to you!

–Emily–

Curious About the Dorms?

Wondering what the dorms are actually like? Take a look at some FIT student’s room tours!

Nagler:

Alumni:

Coed:

Kaufman:

How to Apply for Housing:

Hope that answers some questions!

–Emily–

How to Get Away with Finals

Hi Everyone,

Today is first day of the rest of my life (post-college). What I’m trying to say is, I’M DONE WITH FINALS! I just realised this means, no more homework, no more all-nighters, no more finals EVER (well at least until I do my Masters lol). What am I going to do with my life? (uhm I can think of a million things honestly). For starters I already signed a lease (wow growing up real quick) and went on one job interview (please keep your toes crossed). Seems like im settling down, right? I shall keep you guys updated with this breaking story (haha).

In the meanwhile for those of you, who still have some finals to go or have just started the first round of finals in your FIT lifecycle I have some words of wisdom I’d like to share. This post is mostly about how FIT helped me survive this week and how I myself nailed it.

1. Need some stress relief? Go to PET Therapy! Yes, you heard right puppies that will play with you and help you forget about everything (I just love FIT). Little fluff balls pouncing around waiting for a treat greeted you at the library. It was seriously a very popular event (I mean the line was 45 mins long) but completely worth it. Screen Shot 2014-12-10 at 9.36.15 PM

 

2. Treat yourself after completing that ridiculously long exam. What better than retail therapy, with a purpose? This year for the second time we launched the holiday pop-up shop made by VPED 3rd semester students in collaboration with The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s thrift shop. Last year we raised $35K in just five days, this year we MUST break the record.

Pop-up-10

 

 

3. Just add water, literally haha. This week marks the special care package week where we students receive love from our parents and family in the form of food. The perfect survival kit in a box, for those moments when you just need to study. If you are loved you got one of those blue boxes, if you didn’t don’t fret there is always canned tuna salad in the vending machines (yeah, NO judgments allowed here).3676733c132e1f1158b4518a74dea28b

 

4. Holiday Lights will remind you it is ALMOST Christmas. That moment when you feel your head is about to explode, just walk out and get lost in the lights. There is something about these blue twinkly lights that promises there is light at the end of the tunnel.

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5. And my personal favorite is, study hard but be real. Whatever you didn’t learn in the past 4 months will not come magically to you overnight. Do study, but don’t die in the process. Sleeping is equally as important, because if you miss the alarm because you were too tired all that studying was just time lost.

Good luck with what’s left. And remember above all, have fun:10394782_801228603267000_6866632826051398557_n

Carpe Diem,

Sadie

#FITCOMMUTER

Did you stop by the Dubinsky center lobby this morning? It’s Commuter week at FIT!! Today is Breakfast on the go! ( with free giveaways may I add!!.. Who doesn’t love some free stuff??)

blog1Besides the free breakfast ( bagels) They are also giving away MTA subway cards, MTA monthly cards, portable chargers, IPAD mini, and water bottles! They are also having a scavenger hunt that has been going on all week. It ends at 4pm today but you still have a chance to win one of many prizes. Visit my friends at the table and they will give you all the information you need.

Also participate in FIT student association government social media contest for Commuter Week. Post your commute to or from FIT in the most creative way, and get automatically entered to win a monthly metro card and other grand prizes. Winner will be posted on all FIT student association government social media daily.

Instagram @FITSTUDENTGOV

Twitter: @FITSTUDENTGOV

Facebook:  FIT STUDENT ASSOCIATION

blogger2My interior design studio class loves #FITCOMMUTER week

OK to Post

Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 6.54.07 PMIf you have ever been to FIT, you have probably seen one of these boards before. Despite being very adept at technology, as our name suggests, FIT still uses good old paper posters to advertise upcoming events and clubs. I, for one, am grateful for this, because as someone who receives a mammoth amount of emails each day, passing these every time I use the escalator is much more attention-grabbing.

Posters are put up almost all over the school, but the best place to find out what is going on is on these boards that are on every level of the escalators in the Feldman Center and the Baker School of Business and Technology.

There are all sorts of events advertised here. This one includes posters offering open studio and tea time in the Student Center, “FIT in Discussion” hosted by the LGBTQ and Supporters Group, the Drag Pageant Committee, a runway show inspired by the movie “The Virgin Suicides”, the Public Relations Student Society of America at FIT, several movie screenings, extra hours for the writing studio to aid with final papers, a random “Goodbye Fall” party, Super Smash Bros for the Wii U free play, Fall flee market dates, volunteer opportunities, a talk on a history of psychiatric views on homosexuality, upcoming classes for animation, playwriting, computer graphics, digital literacy for designers, and more!

Even with finals upon us, there is plenty to do here at FIT!

–Emily–